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Question: Central American ruler with a bathtub at mountaintop...

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posted on Jan, 23 2019 @ 11:57 PM
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This is something I've wanted to clarify for years. I saw on some history show that an ancient Central American ruler... had a bathtub / hot tub at the top of a mountain.

IIRC it was spring-fed at that mountain top. The king would be receiving the very first freshwater from the spring, including filling his hot tub. He would heat it with hot coals to the desired temp.

And so the king would sit there in his hot tub, at the mountain top, and he could literally look down over his entire kingdom, below him, and below the mountain!

Now this was years ago that I saw this on TV. I thought it was such an amazing version of a king's chair, that I wrote down his name on a slip of paper. But over the years, the paper has gotten lost among other clutter.

I don't know if it was an Aztec or Mayan ruler, etc. but it was definitely somewhere in Central America OR South America.

I've tried searching for it online but the terms are too general to really get anywhere.

I'm hoping someone has heard of this same thing, and can please remind me of who / where this fantastic king's chair was?

Strike a bell for anyone?




posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 12:09 AM
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Couldn’t find any details online either.. Probably its a fake documentary as usual.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 12:44 AM
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a reply to: Pandaram

Kinda like the news.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 01:18 AM
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originally posted by: peacefulpete
This is something I've wanted to clarify for years. I saw on some history show that an ancient Central American ruler... had a bathtub / hot tub at the top of a mountain.

IIRC it was spring-fed at that mountain top. The king would be receiving the very first freshwater from the spring, including filling his hot tub. He would heat it with hot coals to the desired temp.

And so the king would sit there in his hot tub, at the mountain top, and he could literally look down over his entire kingdom, below him, and below the mountain!

Now this was years ago that I saw this on TV. I thought it was such an amazing version of a king's chair, that I wrote down his name on a slip of paper. But over the years, the paper has gotten lost among other clutter.

I don't know if it was an Aztec or Mayan ruler, etc. but it was definitely somewhere in Central America OR South America.

I've tried searching for it online but the terms are too general to really get anywhere.

I'm hoping someone has heard of this same thing, and can please remind me of who / where this fantastic king's chair was?

Strike a bell for anyone?


I think his name was DB Cowboy and it was a toilet not a bath tub.

Lags



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 02:58 AM
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a reply to: peacefulpete

Geothermal baths or hot springs were very popular between precolumbian cultures.

Many of them still working. I actually visited several times one were the Inca emperor used to bath.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 03:02 AM
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Welcome to our Ool, noticed there is no P in it, lets keep it that way.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 03:32 AM
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Me wants to go there...

Any anectodes and pics to entice a Brit in France?

Lags



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 05:10 AM
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originally posted by: Trueman
a reply to: peacefulpete

Geothermal baths or hot springs were very popular between precolumbian cultures.

Many of them still working. I actually visited several times one were the Inca emperor used to bath.


Do you know the name of the site? I'd like to look it up specifically...



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 05:12 AM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
Welcome to our Ool, noticed there is no P in it, lets keep it that way.


Ha well the ruler in question probably used to have parties up there in that hot tub, full of women and food and drinks splashing around lol.

But the awesome thing is that if they spilled stuff into the pool, it would instantly just wash away. Because the water was constantly pouring through the hot tub, and then down the mountain, toward his kingdom.

He could presumably control it enough to keep it as hot as he wanted it. (From his workers pouring hot coals into it, as much as he wanted.)


edit on 24-1-2019 by peacefulpete because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 06:01 AM
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a reply to: peacefulpete

That's inspiring. Now I want to put a bathtub on my roof.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 09:11 AM
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mesoamerica and Central America are so fascinating.

I’m a huge fan of Mexico City and surroundings (Aztec) and Guatemala (Maya).
a reply to: peacefulpete



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: peacefulpete

content://media/external/file/25659

Banos Termales de calientes Pachia.



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: peacefulpete

Sounds like the Incan Emperor Pachaucutec and his private bath at Machu Picchu.


The water from the nearby peak of Machu Picchu, meanwhile, descended into the citadel through a stone-lined aqueduct and arrived first at Pachacutec’s living quarters, thus allowing the emperor to come into contact with only the purest water available. A stone-cut pool in Pachacutec’s dwelling allowed the emperor to bathe in complete privacy while the emperor’s residence also had the only water-flushed lavatory at Machu Picchu.


Link



posted on Jan, 24 2019 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: tommyjo
a reply to: peacefulpete

Sounds like the Incan Emperor Pachaucutec and his private bath at Machu Picchu.


The water from the nearby peak of Machu Picchu, meanwhile, descended into the citadel through a stone-lined aqueduct and arrived first at Pachacutec’s living quarters, thus allowing the emperor to come into contact with only the purest water available. A stone-cut pool in Pachacutec’s dwelling allowed the emperor to bathe in complete privacy while the emperor’s residence also had the only water-flushed lavatory at Machu Picchu.


Link


Yes, this is it. Thanks!!




posted on Jan, 25 2019 @ 08:34 AM
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originally posted by: peacefulpete

originally posted by: tommyjo
a reply to: peacefulpete

Sounds like the Incan Emperor Pachaucutec and his private bath at Machu Picchu.


The water from the nearby peak of Machu Picchu, meanwhile, descended into the citadel through a stone-lined aqueduct and arrived first at Pachacutec’s living quarters, thus allowing the emperor to come into contact with only the purest water available. A stone-cut pool in Pachacutec’s dwelling allowed the emperor to bathe in complete privacy while the emperor’s residence also had the only water-flushed lavatory at Machu Picchu.


Link


Yes, this is it. Thanks!!



No problem. Thanks for the reply!



posted on Jan, 25 2019 @ 08:49 AM
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originally posted by: tommyjo

originally posted by: peacefulpete

originally posted by: tommyjo
a reply to: peacefulpete

Sounds like the Incan Emperor Pachaucutec and his private bath at Machu Picchu.


The water from the nearby peak of Machu Picchu, meanwhile, descended into the citadel through a stone-lined aqueduct and arrived first at Pachacutec’s living quarters, thus allowing the emperor to come into contact with only the purest water available. A stone-cut pool in Pachacutec’s dwelling allowed the emperor to bathe in complete privacy while the emperor’s residence also had the only water-flushed lavatory at Machu Picchu.


Link


Yes, this is it. Thanks!!



No problem. Thanks for the reply!


Yeah I'm pretty excited. It's been several years that I've wanted to figure this out.

Unfortunately no photos of his personal hot tub, in your link, but I don't think there are really online photos of this one particular thing lol.

It was almost impossible to search for because searching Incan / mayan hot tubs / bath tubs etc. would just bring up modern bathroom fixtures and tiles lol.







 
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