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Strange thing spotted in the river.

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posted on Mar, 4 2019 @ 07:44 PM
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a reply to: aquiel

My family has a cabin on the Delaware river. Different but I'd go with something on the eel type. One other possibility, a type of sturgeon?




posted on Mar, 4 2019 @ 08:07 PM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

I second this.



posted on Mar, 4 2019 @ 08:32 PM
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I'm thinking a Wel's catfish or how big do the Burbot get there? I know some pretty big ones have come out of Loch Ness.



posted on Mar, 5 2019 @ 05:28 AM
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a reply to: TheGoondockSaint

I thought that burbots vanished from the UK in the 60's. The Angling Times put out a reward of £100 for catching one, it is still unclaimed as far as I know.



posted on Mar, 5 2019 @ 07:10 AM
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originally posted by: oldcarpy
a reply to: TheGoondockSaint

I thought that burbots vanished from the UK in the 60's. The Angling Times put out a reward of £100 for catching one, it is still unclaimed as far as I know.


Thanks for the heads up I didn't realize that. I thought they had vanished in our Lake Winnebago system (Wisconsin, USA) but have seen people posting pictures of catching them while ice fishing this year.



posted on Mar, 5 2019 @ 09:10 AM
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a reply to: TheGoondockSaint

I believe some guys tried to catch a burbot over here a while back but I think they went insane.



posted on Mar, 5 2019 @ 09:20 AM
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Here's your answer. Bowfin, they turn greenish yellow on their underside during mating season.
Bowfin



posted on Mar, 5 2019 @ 09:22 AM
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a reply to: Shockerking

No bowfins in the UK, unfortunately.



posted on Apr, 5 2019 @ 10:25 AM
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I may have been a large submerged tree branch. I mention this because I've seen these in moving water and they do look like living creatures because they roll and tumble.

Not all branches and logs float; if they've been in the water for a few days, they can achieve neutral buoyancy and float below the surface or even attain negative buoyancy and bounce along the river bottom. If one end contacts the bottom, a rock, etc., it can make the log or branch roll and partially emerge--usually preceded by a large swirl on the surface created by the flowing water.

It does get my attention when this happens because the first thing I think is, "it's alive!"




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