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Pay that tuition suckers

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posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: narrator




Same with insurance companies


Let me tell you an insurance story! My sons car had some serious mechanical issues. We decided to let him use one of our cars. We added him to our insurance. He retained insurance on his own car. He was able to get parts quickly and fix his car up.

So a couple of weeks later we try to take him off our insurance. Do you know how difficult that was? We had to provide multiple items to prove he had his own insurance. He is an adult!!

I guess in some cases auto insurance won't even let you take an adult child off your insurance even if they have their own! How is that legal??




posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: narrator




Same with insurance companies


Let me tell you an insurance story! My sons car had some serious mechanical issues. We decided to let him use one of our cars. We added him to our insurance. He retained insurance on his own car. He was able to get parts quickly and fix his car up.

So a couple of weeks later we try to take him off our insurance. Do you know how difficult that was? We had to provide multiple items to prove he had his own insurance. He is an adult!!

I guess in some cases auto insurance won't even let you take an adult child off your insurance even if they have their own! How is that legal??


I actually dealt with a very similar situation not too long ago! Not with my child, but my brother. He lives overseas 9 months out of the year, and when he was home this summer he needed to be able to drive, so I wanted to add him to my car insurance for those few months. The amount of hoops I had to jump through was astounding! When he was heading back overseas..."Does he now have proof of his own insurance?" "No, he doesn't need it because he doesn't own a car, and he lives in Taiwan where he doesn't drive". "Well, we can't just let him drive without proof of insurance." "He isn't driving, he's in Taiwan for the next 9 months, at least." "He'll need insurance when he gets back." "Who knows when that will be, it could be 10 years, or never." Etc. Etc. Etc.
Ridiculous!



posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 08:15 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
There are probably only about 30 to 50 universities in the US that are worth going in debt to attend. Even then, some are better than others and degree matters.

It is one thing to go into debt to attend MIT for STEM or Harvard and other Ivy / Prestigious schools were a decent job is almost guaranteed. I can see someone taking on debt as those schools can open up doors. However, it makes zero sense to go into debt to attend a 2nd tier school.
Unless getting a highly practical degree. Many fields or roles don’t require a top tier school: k-12 education, nursing, etc.



posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 08:17 PM
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Right, when I was an educator in the 2000’s there was a constant message of motivating and preparing all kids to go to college.

It’s not even practical because you can’t have a society of only white collar professionals.
a reply to: headorheart



posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 08:57 PM
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originally posted by: Quetzalcoatl14

originally posted by: Edumakated
There are probably only about 30 to 50 universities in the US that are worth going in debt to attend. Even then, some are better than others and degree matters.

It is one thing to go into debt to attend MIT for STEM or Harvard and other Ivy / Prestigious schools were a decent job is almost guaranteed. I can see someone taking on debt as those schools can open up doors. However, it makes zero sense to go into debt to attend a 2nd tier school.
Unless getting a highly practical degree. Many fields or roles don’t require a top tier school: k-12 education, nursing, etc.


The problem is that all schools tend to want to charge top tier tuition for their degrees, and those professions you cite do not pay top tier salaries. So if you end up going deeply into debt for a second tier school for a degree that won't even begin to clear your debt, then it doesn't really matter if you got a decent job with a degree from a solid school rather than a top tier one because it still won't let you pay off your loans.



posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 09:17 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: Quetzalcoatl14

originally posted by: Edumakated
There are probably only about 30 to 50 universities in the US that are worth going in debt to attend. Even then, some are better than others and degree matters.

It is one thing to go into debt to attend MIT for STEM or Harvard and other Ivy / Prestigious schools were a decent job is almost guaranteed. I can see someone taking on debt as those schools can open up doors. However, it makes zero sense to go into debt to attend a 2nd tier school.
Unless getting a highly practical degree. Many fields or roles don’t require a top tier school: k-12 education, nursing, etc.


The problem is that all schools tend to want to charge top tier tuition for their degrees, and those professions you cite do not pay top tier salaries. So if you end up going deeply into debt for a second tier school for a degree that won't even begin to clear your debt, then it doesn't really matter if you got a decent job with a degree from a solid school rather than a top tier one because it still won't let you pay off your loans.


Exactly my point. People are paying top tier tuition for 2nd and 3rd tier schools that don't offer the same opportunities. If you are able to gain admission to a top tier school, then it most certainly makes sense to consider taking on debt as you will likely find employment sufficient to pay it off. On the other hand, if you don't gain admissions to a top tier school, you should go to the cheapest school possible.



posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 09:31 PM
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Exactly my point. People are paying top tier tuition for 2nd and 3rd tier schools that don't offer the same opportunities. If you are able to gain admission to a top tier school, then it most certainly makes sense to consider taking on debt as you will likely find employment sufficient to pay it off. On the other hand, if you don't gain admissions to a top tier school, you should go to the cheapest school possible.


The most ironic thing is that people that go to top tier schools often actually pay less than 2nd and 3rd tier schools.
Dirty little secret that most people don't know. Many students won't even apply because they are scared by the illusion of high tuition costs.


www.niche.com...

"Six in 10 say they are unaware that ‘colleges discount their published price so that incoming freshmen pay less than what is published.’”

“This is a remarkable mismatch,” Pryor says. According to his data, “40% of potential students reject a school out of hand purely on sticker price. Even more have no idea that tuition discounting ameliorates the sticker price. This is a very large sector of the population that think they cannot afford an institution when it might be affordable. The sticker price shocks them. Yet the people setting that price think that what they are doing is well known.”
edit on 16-1-2019 by JAGStorm because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 16 2019 @ 09:38 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm


Exactly my point. People are paying top tier tuition for 2nd and 3rd tier schools that don't offer the same opportunities. If you are able to gain admission to a top tier school, then it most certainly makes sense to consider taking on debt as you will likely find employment sufficient to pay it off. On the other hand, if you don't gain admissions to a top tier school, you should go to the cheapest school possible.


The most ironic thing is that people that go to top tier schools often actually pay less than 2nd and 3rd tier schools.
Dirty little secret that most people don't know. Many students won't even apply because they are scared by the illusion of high tuition costs.


www.niche.com...

"Six in 10 say they are unaware that ‘colleges discount their published price so that incoming freshmen pay less than what is published.’”

“This is a remarkable mismatch,” Pryor says. According to his data, “40% of potential students reject a school out of hand purely on sticker price. Even more have no idea that tuition discounting ameliorates the sticker price. This is a very large sector of the population that think they cannot afford an institution when it might be affordable. The sticker price shocks them. Yet the people setting that price think that what they are doing is well known.”


Yup. Yale is free if the household income is less than $65k. They significantly discount to households making $200k or less.



posted on Jan, 17 2019 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko

originally posted by: Quetzalcoatl14

originally posted by: Edumakated
There are probably only about 30 to 50 universities in the US that are worth going in debt to attend. Even then, some are better than others and degree matters.

It is one thing to go into debt to attend MIT for STEM or Harvard and other Ivy / Prestigious schools were a decent job is almost guaranteed. I can see someone taking on debt as those schools can open up doors. However, it makes zero sense to go into debt to attend a 2nd tier school.
Unless getting a highly practical degree. Many fields or roles don’t require a top tier school: k-12 education, nursing, etc.


The problem is that all schools tend to want to charge top tier tuition for their degrees, and those professions you cite do not pay top tier salaries. So if you end up going deeply into debt for a second tier school for a degree that won't even begin to clear your debt, then it doesn't really matter if you got a decent job with a degree from a solid school rather than a top tier one because it still won't let you pay off your loans.

Right, agreed. For such jobs one should be aiming for an affordable school, unless they have a scholarship or family paying for it.

At Columbia I’d meet people getting a teacher or social work degree with tuition at like $50,000 a year. My thoughts were identical to yours on that point.



posted on Jan, 17 2019 @ 01:04 PM
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a reply to: Quetzalcoatl14

Most young people can't grasp the concept of time and money right out of high school.

They don't realize that 50K a year equals 200K or more for a degree. I've told a couple of young folks that there are many people with mortgages of that amount that have not been able to pay it off in 30 years, let that soak in!

I've known people that have had mortgages that were 120K or so, and have refinanced, and refinanced, and 40 years later still have a mortgage! Some people even looked into the reverse mortgages, but they have refinanced so much there is no meat left on the bone!!



posted on Jan, 17 2019 @ 01:50 PM
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For many though I think that’s recent, as in the last 10 years. The problem is that I don’t think most schools do so for grad school. Ivy leagues and other private schools for grad school range still $30-50,000 a year. There are though teaching and program assistant fellowships. Those too can be competitive however.

Princeton’s policy school is a full ride for all students, but let’s in less people and is very competitve.

A lot of people don’t know but even a top tier public school’s law schools or mbas, let’s say at UC Berkeley, are substantially more exp per year than their undergrad. They start to get closer to private school cost.
a reply to: JAGStorm


edit on 17-1-2019 by Quetzalcoatl14 because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-1-2019 by Quetzalcoatl14 because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-1-2019 by Quetzalcoatl14 because: (no reason given)




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