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Brexit, Today is the Vote!

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posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: shooterbrody

Presidents have been set before regarding a second referendum being held.




posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: shooterbrody

Your link points out that the 1979 referendum on Scottish devolution wasn't followed through because of low voter turn out. So there I guess is one possible case. Even more cases of this though when you look at other European states voting in referendums regarding the EU

As to what the point is in the vote if its not "legally binding", buggered if I know but thats the situation we are in. If you agree with that or not, it doesn't really matter. It wasn't a legally binding vote so the government could unilaterally decide to retract article 50 and just leave the whole thing behind. Obviously that would not be a popular idea.
edit on 15-1-2019 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)

edit on 15-1-2019 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Not in the UK.....only in Republic of Ireland and Portugal, I think, where the people voted against the wishes of the EU and their governments and they were forced to vote again.

And for me that is the heart of the problem.....the EU should never be able to dictate UK legislation or that of any other sovereign nation.


edit on 15/1/19 by Freeborn because: clarity



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:17 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: shooterbrody

Presidents have been set before regarding a second referendum being held.


Any of those I sourced?



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:17 AM
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I thought Brexit was a done deal regardless of an agreement. It was either a soft exit or a hard, no deal exit. I must have misunderstood the options.



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:18 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn




But they have a moral duty to respect the British people's Right to Self-Determination.



Agreed.



If Parliament fails to enact the result of the referendum then we should cease all pretence of being a democracy.



Depends how they do it, if they just rip up the article 50 declaration and go back to business as usual before 2016 then yeah, its a slap in the face of democracy.

Now I know you and I will disagree on this but I think that a second referendum is democratic, in fact I think it's probably the most democratic way to settle the issue if parliament is unable to deliver on the 2016 referendum.



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn

Not in the UK but in the EU its not unheard of occurrence.

And technically we are still part of the E.U until we do Brexit.

I can't see how a second referendum could hurt given May's debacle deal, to be honest.
edit on 15-1-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




I am not aware of any instance where the outcome of the referendum was not honoured however I would add that traditionally the UK has not been that big on referendums in comparison to some of our European cousins.

So this will set precedence for your nation?


Your link points out that the 1979 referendum on Scottish devolution wasn't followed through because of low voter turn out. So there I guess is one possible case.

Was that dependent upon a certain amount of turnout?



It wasn't a legally binding vote so the government could unilaterally decide to retract article 50 and just leave the whole thing behind.

What steps would have to be taken for that to occur?



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:21 AM
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originally posted by: Christosterone
So the British citizenry legally votes to leave the EU...

The politicians say “nah, let’s not do that. Maybe we will hold another vote or another until the people vote the ‘correct’ way”

I would be livid if I was a British voter...
But I’m a Texan so I doubt y’all care...

-Chris


They did just that in Ireland.

I think if they was to do another vote, they have done the job in the media to scare just enough people of the doom and gloom they will vote to stay.

I see Poll Tax Riots 2 happening.



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:21 AM
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originally posted by: Freeborn
a reply to: andy06shake

Not in the UK.....only in Republic of Ireland and Portugal, I think, where the people voted against the wishes of the EU and their governments and they were forced to vote again.

And for me that is the heart of the problem.....the EU should never be able to dictate UK legislation or any other sovereign nation.


so there are no instances of a uk referendum not being honored?



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: shooterbrody

Google is your friend their mate.

From memory i think, Norway, Ireland and France, have had second referendums on important political topics.
edit on 15-1-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn




May is obviously going to lose tonight's vote....all that is left is a No Deal.....anything else is a failure to carry out the wishes of the British people.

No deal will not be sanctioned by Parliament so it's off the table , I agree it is the only option which is probably why it's been ruled out.
Our only option now is a bad deal (regardless of future negotiation) or remain.

We won yet we lose.



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: shooterbrody

We are part of the E.U so yes there are indeed instances.

As i said presidents have been set before.
edit on 15-1-2019 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:23 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: shooterbrody

Google is your friend their mate.

From memory i think, Norway Irland and France, have had second referendums on important political topics.

I was asking specifically about the uk.
Thank you.



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: shooterbrody

But the UK is part of the EU, so technically......



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:24 AM
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a reply to: shooterbrody




Was that dependent upon a certain amount of turnout?



Your link points out that the minimum voter turn out was to be 40% this wasn't met so despite a majority voting for Scottish devolution it never happened, then in 1997 there was another vote. There are other examples with in the EU the Lisbon Treaty is a good example of this so there is precedent for second referendums in the UK and in Europe over the same issue.



What steps would have to be taken for that to occur?



So the European courts have ruled that the UK could retract article 50 and their motion to leave the EU with out having to consult other EU member states and if it done this it would retain all current agreements and concessions it has with the EU. In other words the UK wouldn't need to do very much, it would literally just be writing a letter.



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:25 AM
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a reply to: shooterbrody




so there are no instances of a uk referendum not being honored?



Yup 1979 Scottish devolution because they argued that voter turn out did not meet the required 40% threshold despite the vast majority of people who voted voted for devolution.



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:25 AM
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originally posted by: andy06shake
a reply to: shooterbrody

But the UK is part of the EU, so technically......

Did people in the UK vote on the referendum in Norway or France?



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

So there was a standard not met so the referendum failed?
Was there the same standard for the brexit vote?



posted on Jan, 15 2019 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




So the European courts have ruled that the UK could retract article 50 and their motion to leave the EU with out having to consult other EU member states and if it done this it would retain all current agreements and concessions it has with the EU. In other words the UK wouldn't need to do very much, it would literally just be writing a letter.

European courts hold sway over a uk referendum?




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