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Quake Watch 2019

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posted on Jul, 5 2019 @ 11:59 PM
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I doubt the show is over and up where I live we had the 6.4 followed by the 5.6 so a bit strong for an aftershock. Glad I just picked up a good supply of water.




posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 12:56 AM
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originally posted by: ANNED
WOW WHAT A RIDE 7.1 mag is something else

I live in Ridgecrest and my motor home went down off the hydraulic jacks and now is setting on its tires.

i hope this one was the main shock not just another for shock


Stay safe anned..........seriously.......you guys get everything you need just in case..



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 01:03 AM
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They are saying on CNN that the 7.1 was the big one but that may be premature, have to wait and see.



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 01:13 AM
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Can someone in the know help me?

I'm trying to analyze the forces in these quakes. Looking at the fault lines in that area, what I am seeing is a primary (my word) fault running mostly east-west (then turning more southward toward LA), but at Ridgecrest it forks, with several secondary (my word) faults running northward at about a right angle to the primary fault. Is that correct?

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 07:21 AM
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originally posted by: MamaJ
a reply to: violet
Do you think the 5.4 is a big aftershock for a 6.4 mainshock?


I’m replying to my own post. Yesterday after this 5.4 I asked Lucy Jones on Twitter why only an 8 percent chance likely a bigger one when the 5.4 should be seen as a foreshock to something bigger. She never replied and today states 1 in 20 chance the 7.1 was not the main shock.

I’m sure they can’t alert the public right now I get it they have been talking about a big one and been having a plan.. do the people have a plan yet? I hope so.
Brace yourself California !



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: MamaJ

I know many of the senior facilities out there in Cali always run articles on earthquake prep. Depending on their level of care, they either advise their residents on how to prep or they talk about the emergency measures they have in place to cope with large disasters like earthquakes and now wildfires.

The facilities in Florida are the same way.

So if you have an older relative out in Cali, you better be checking with them and their facility to find out exactly how something like this will be managed. Some seniors are on their own while others will be handled.



posted on Jul, 6 2019 @ 09:28 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
Can someone in the know help me?

I'm trying to analyze the forces in these quakes. Looking at the fault lines in that area, what I am seeing is a primary (my word) fault running mostly east-west (then turning more southward toward LA), but at Ridgecrest it forks, with several secondary (my word) faults running northward at about a right angle to the primary fault. Is that correct?

TheRedneck


Damn sad no one can help you, especially on here. Guess ATS either banned or scared off the talent.

With that said, there are many resources to dig into , including the IRIS site, which states that this last quake was a fore shock.



A magnitude 7.1 earthquake occurred 17km (10.6 miles) NNE of Ridgecrest, California at a depth of 17 km (10.6 miles). The earthquake was felt as far north as San Jose and as far south as Mexico. This earthquake follows a magnitude 6.4 Thursday that we can now define as a foreshock.


www.iris.edu...

Wish I could share the video of this, but it shows the progression of the 2 quakes .

www.facebook.com...


Where the f#@k is Trueman on this???

I have more , but to much going on to search and share with a 9 year old grandaughter running around.




posted on Jul, 9 2019 @ 07:59 PM
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M 4.1 - 9km E of Coso Junction, CA

2019-07-10 00:48:17 (UTC)
36.057°N 117.851°W

0.5 km depth

earthquake.usgs.gov...

Although probably an aftershock, it seems a bit farther away from most of the other aftershocks.
Almost like they are spreading beyond the faults to other faults.

The last three in an hour at this location.

2.7
8km E of Coso Junction, CA
2019-07-09 16:53:25 (UTC-08:00)
1.8 km

4.1
9km E of Coso Junction, CA
2019-07-09 16:48:17 (UTC-08:00)
0.5 km

2.5
9km ENE of Coso Junction, CA
2019-07-09 16:24:18 (UTC-08:00)
-0.2 km

Edit...make that 4 earthquakes

2.9
9km ENE of Coso Junction, CA
2019-07-09 16:58:38 (UTC-08:00)
2.0 km


I dont think these are aftershocks after looking at the map.
A new swarm?
edit on 9-7-2019 by Darkblade71 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2019 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: Groot

Yeah, I'm a little concerned. It looks to me like the land mass to the southeast of Ridgecrest is moving west-southwest. Add in the land mass to the northeast of the San Andreas moving northwest, and I see a knife edge being forced into the San Andreas Around the Castac Lake area. To my thinking, that could be a very, very bad thing... but then again, I may be missing something or looking at the data all wrong. That's why I was asking for help understanding what is going on; if I just read up with this thought biasing me, it's not really going to help clarify anything.

Maybe someone will come along...

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 12 2019 @ 03:58 PM
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4.6 just north of Seattle.

www.cnn.com...



posted on Jul, 12 2019 @ 04:04 PM
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originally posted by: AlexanderM
4.6 just north of Seattle.

www.cnn.com...


Yeah, it’s got people in Oregon a wee bit puckered.



posted on Jul, 12 2019 @ 11:50 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Here are a couple of images that may help:




The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology — both in Pasadena, California — created this co-seismic Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) map that shows surface displacement caused by the recent major earthquakes in Southern California, including the magnitude 6.4 and the magnitude 7.1 events on July 4 and July 5, 2019, respectively.

The interferogram is derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images from the ALOS-2 satellite, operated by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The images were taken before (April 16, 2018) and after (July 8, 2019) the sequence of earthquakes. Each color cycle represents 4.8 inches (12 centimeters) of ground displacement in the radar line-of-sight.

The image covers an area of 31 by 78 miles (50 by 125 kilometers), and each pixel measures about 98 yards (90 meters) across. No filter was applied during the processing. The linear features across which the color fringes break indicate likely locations of surface rupture caused by the earthquakes, and the "noisy" areas may indicate locations where ground surface was disturbed by the earthquakes.


PIA23150: NASA's ARIA Maps Southern California Quake Damage

And




The Advanced Rapid Imaging and Analysis (ARIA) team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, created this map of the Ridgecrest area of Southern California following two strong earthquakes — a magnitude 6.4 on July 4 and a magnitude 7.1 on July 5, 2019. The map shows how much and in what direction the ground moved in various places, displayed in meters.

The blue tones show that the ground west of the main fault rupture, which runs from the lower right to the upper left, moved toward the northwest by as much as 0.8 meters (2.7 feet) during the 7.1-magnitude quake. The ground in the red and pink areas moved southeast by as much as 0.6 meters (2 feet). Black lines show faults that were mapped before the 2019 earthquakes.

The 6.4-magnitude quake moved a shorter fault that runs perpendicular to the main fault — shown slightly down and to the left of center on the map. The colors in this area show that the north side of the fault moved to the west (blue) and the south side moved to the east (pink). The green circles correspond to aftershocks of a magnitude of 3.0 or higher, which were detected along both faults, between July 4 and July 9. The larger the circle, the stronger the aftershock.

The ARIA team used interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) analysis of data from the ALOS-2 satellite, operated by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to create the map. They used images captured before the quakes (on April 16, 2018) and after the quakes (on July 8, 2019) for this analysis


PIA23351: NASA Map Shows Ground Movement from California Quakes

I found a few other resources as well that show fault maps for the area:

Earthquake Zones of Required Investigation

Fault Activity Map of California (2010)

U.S. Quaternary Faults

Hope these help.
edit on 13-7-2019 by jadedANDcynical because: fixed url tags



posted on Jul, 13 2019 @ 12:44 AM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical


Hope these help.

They certainly do! Thank you!

I'm not real sure about what the first pic is showing (other than a psychedelic view of the earthquake zone? lol) but the map and explanation are a big help. I take back my original concern; it was based on an inferior understanding of the geology and exact areas of movement.

Thanks again!

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 13 2019 @ 01:13 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

The psychedelic image shows ground deformation that took place between two different times satellite imagery was captured:


InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) is a technique for mapping ground deformation using radar images of the Earth's surface that are collected from orbiting satellites. Unlike visible or infrared light, radar waves penetrate most weather clouds and are equally effective in darkness. So with InSAR it is possible to track ground deformation even in bad weather and at night – two big advantages during a volcanic crisis.

Two radar images of the same area that were collected at different times from similar vantage points in space can be compared against each other. Any movement of the ground surface toward or away from the satellite can be measured and portrayed as a "picture" – not of the surface itself but of how much the surface moved (deformed) during the time between images.


InSAR—Satellite-based technique captures overall deformation "picture"

Each color in the image represents a specific distance that ground has moved between the times the imagery was captured by satellite. In the instance of the image in question, that distance is approximately 12 cm. The wider bands show ground that was moved en mass, whereas the noisy areas represent ground which was greatly disturbed; think ground that has been gone over by a disc harrow and you've got the idea.

The epicenter is approximately in the area shown by the black circle below:


You can see that the colors are quite jumbled and haphazard rather than being in large contiguous bands like they are further from the fault lines.

The chaotic area in the right of the image presents mountainous terrain which likely experienced quite a bit of landsliding due to the earthquake, even if it was merely surface boulders/pebbles.



posted on Jul, 13 2019 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: jadedANDcynical

OK, that makes a lot more sense than USGS scientists on acid.


The explanation makes sense, seriously. I had just never seen one of these images. Thanks for the education!

TheRedneck



posted on Jul, 13 2019 @ 05:00 PM
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M 2.6 - 123km WSW of Brookings, Oregon
Time
2019-07-13 00:24:42 (UTC)
Location
41.734°N 125.716°W
Depth
14.5 km



posted on Jul, 14 2019 @ 07:24 AM
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Gosh I sure do miss the way it used to be! Not my childhood although I miss it but coming on here and talking to other like minded people about what’s going on and what’s transpiring as I type.

Greece is swarming! Montana just chimes in with a 4.0
Indonesia had a massive quake 7.3 and Australia is on the edge of a massive one as well.

There is a lot of energy bombarding our planet. Magma is moving as well, stay alert and stay safe no matter where you are located!



posted on Jul, 14 2019 @ 12:42 PM
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6.6 in Australia, with a couple aftershocks, also hearing of 7.3 in Indonesia.

earthquaketrack.com...



posted on Jul, 16 2019 @ 04:11 PM
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M 4.3
12km E of Blackhawk, CA

2019-07-16 20:11:01 (UTC)
37.816°N 121.766°W

12.2 km depth

earthquake.usgs.gov...



posted on Jul, 17 2019 @ 10:17 AM
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M 5.3 - 246km WNW of Bandon, Oregon

2019-07-17 15:00:00 (UTC)

43.620°N 127.377°W

14.0 km depth

earthquake.usgs.gov...


Upgraded to 5.4
edit on 17-7-2019 by Darkblade71 because: (no reason given)



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