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Volunteering For A Front Row Seat to Exploration, Would Anyone Actually Do It?

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posted on Jan, 10 2019 @ 10:24 PM
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a reply to: rcwilliams775

Giving it's Viable..( getting out of the earth and suns gravitational pull ). Then yes I will or would.

Medically trained, however not able to reproduce ( and as been told reproducing in space is not achievable yet as a species) .

No kids, never married... absolutely!😊

My initial thought after highschool was.. " I was born in this world. Be a shame if I never see it before I die" ~Bigburgh

Now I wish to see it from above and everything out of this world. So I'm on-board for the remainder of my life... give or take 40 to 50 years.

It takes longer to leave the solar system. But yes I'd jump in.


EDIT: NO WIFI NO CHANCE... IT'S A LONG DANG TRIP😉👍
edit on 10-1-2019 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 10 2019 @ 10:48 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari

originally posted by: Bluntone22
Doesn't really matter if you would volunteer at this point.
The human body can't survive in a weightless environment for the time it would take to exit the solar system. Not to mention the inability to carry enough resources to sustain someone.

We are not going anywhere in the foreseeable future.


~sigh~

You need to change your username to "Captain Buzzkill."

Damn facts... ~shuffling away, kicking a can~.


Yeah, my bad.



posted on Jan, 10 2019 @ 11:20 PM
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Theoretically it is currently do-able with technology we have right now. The problem is the engineering and logistics behind doing so. The ability to create a perpetually sustainable habitat is possible, the ability to put it together is possible, the ability to propel it is possible. However it would be very cost and labor intensive, and no entity currently has the capacity to put together such a program, as each person in the crew would require about 5-10 acres of flat area in general, but likely could be vastly reduced via hydroponics, and year round harvest cycles. That is a pretty darn big craft to have. There is a guy on youtube that gets into the nitty gritty of this, albeit a lot of it can be very boring to the layman.

www.youtube.com...

If such a program were to become a reality, I would sign up, just as I will when it becomes possible to colonize mars.
edit on 10-1-2019 by dubiousatworst because: keep on target



posted on Jan, 10 2019 @ 11:22 PM
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When can we leave?



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 12:22 AM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
When can we leave?

probably a lot sooner than we think we will




posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 12:42 AM
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And have my soul wander the wasteland of Mars for eternity all alone?

No way.

The afterlife is going to be a party on Earth-After.

Wouldn't miss it for the world!



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 12:55 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
Doesn't really matter if you would volunteer at this point.
The human body can't survive in a weightless environment for the time it would take to exit the solar system.


I don't think the adventurer would go "weightless" until a certain distance away from our Sun is reached.



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: dubiousatworst

Elon is that you in the Starman suit?



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 04:14 AM
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a reply to: rcwilliams775

given the current level of " machine inteligence " - and the limittions of human eyes - a n autonomous probe - wold still give better science - yes a human would ad emotinal context - but given the fraility of the human psyche - and the scope of your proposed mission - by the time the vessel reached jupiter - expect a drooling basket case -



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 04:17 AM
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i would go on a one way trip - only it it involved actions activity that could not be preformed by autonoumous // semi autonomous units - and would truely benefit humanity

ie - constructing the shell of a future colony habitat [ although - regard robots as being fully capable of doing that ]



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 04:30 AM
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a reply to: rcwilliams775

Before my son was born, in a heart beat, cheerfully, without hesitation...

Now no, I want to see him grow and become a man.



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 04:36 AM
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Wouldn't such a trip be a very boring and uneventful one? Apart from fly-bys of planets and other objects (which are very far in-between), it would be just uneventful coasting though space, for months or even years. And once you're past Neptune and Pluto, there's even less to see. The trip will turn into a "survive and keep yourself busy so you don't go mad" experiment.

I'd much more readily agree to a round trip to Jupiter or Saturn.

~~~


originally posted by: Bluntone22
The human body can't survive in a weightless environment for the time it would take to exit the solar system.

Could you provide any proof towards what you said?

Astronauts spent a whole year in zero-g aboard the ISS. While it does present some problems, the real trouble started when they returned to earth and its gravity.
edit on 11-1-2019 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 05:46 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Wouldn't such a trip be a very boring and uneventful one? Apart from fly-bys of planets and other objects (which are very far in-between), it would be just uneventful coasting though space, for months or even years. And once you're past Neptune and Pluto, there's even less to see. The trip will turn into a "survive and keep yourself busy so you don't go mad" experiment.

I'd much more readily agree to a round trip to Jupiter or Saturn.


Thats my question and why I was thinking of this topic. What would you see, anything? Nothing? Things we don't understand yet? What if we sent the volunteer UP into space or Down into space and not OUT into space on the orbital plain? Our galaxy is a lot less thick than it is wide, so why didn't we send voyager that way? Bottom line is I think the person who would go, even if bored would everyday also be in awe of realizing how vast space is from that seat.



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 05:58 AM
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What would it 'matter' (pun intended) if We traveled FAR enough, everyone We knew on Mother Earth would have "passed" and then We would have to search around for 'Our Folks' all the while they'd be in different bodies...



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 06:41 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Wouldn't such a trip be a very boring and uneventful one? Apart from fly-bys of planets and other objects (which are very far in-between), it would be just uneventful coasting though space, for months or even years. And once you're past Neptune and Pluto, there's even less to see. The trip will turn into a "survive and keep yourself busy so you don't go mad" experiment.

I'd much more readily agree to a round trip to Jupiter or Saturn.

~~~


originally posted by: Bluntone22
The human body can't survive in a weightless environment for the time it would take to exit the solar system.

Could you provide any proof towards what you said?

Astronauts spent a whole year in zero-g aboard the ISS. While it does present some problems, the real trouble started when they returned to earth and its gravity.



Here's something from NASA.

science.nasa.gov...

And another.

www.google.com...


Humans are designed to live in a specific environment and gravity is a part of that environment.



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 06:57 AM
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a reply to: rcwilliams775

Could land a ship on a comet/asteroid which could take you much further at a faster speed.

I was just thinking about this yesterday actually... hopping from one asteroid/comet to the next travelling through space. Of course, you'd have to be ready to get off that asteroid/comet if it was going to hit something



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22

originally posted by: wildespace
Wouldn't such a trip be a very boring and uneventful one? Apart from fly-bys of planets and other objects (which are very far in-between), it would be just uneventful coasting though space, for months or even years. And once you're past Neptune and Pluto, there's even less to see. The trip will turn into a "survive and keep yourself busy so you don't go mad" experiment.

I'd much more readily agree to a round trip to Jupiter or Saturn.

~~~


originally posted by: Bluntone22
The human body can't survive in a weightless environment for the time it would take to exit the solar system.

Could you provide any proof towards what you said?

Astronauts spent a whole year in zero-g aboard the ISS. While it does present some problems, the real trouble started when they returned to earth and its gravity.



Here's something from NASA.

science.nasa.gov...

And another.

www.google.com...


Humans are designed to live in a specific environment and gravity is a part of that environment.


As someone else mentioned, I think the issue comes when you return to earth your body cannot handle the gravity. While in space I am assuming you would be ok (by ok I mean as good as one can be doing this for such a long time). Plus this is only a ONE WAY trip so fixing issues isn't a concern...just send some good pain meds with..lol



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 07:22 AM
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a reply to: rcwilliams775

You might be right, the truth is we dont know the long term effects.
I think the longest stay was something like 425 days, just a year and a few months.

But decades....damn.
There is also the radiation issue.
Nasa was concerned with the lunar astronauts getting to much exposure so this would have to be worse.

I guess this whole thread is asking if you would take a one way trip. To me the risk is not worth the possible gain.



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 08:38 AM
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a reply to: rcwilliams775

Sounds like We need Dr Mann from Interstellar.



posted on Jan, 11 2019 @ 09:55 AM
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a reply to: rcwilliams775

I would absolutely board a spaceship bound for the furthest flung reaches of this galaxy or any other, under the right circumstances.

I will list some of the technical mile markers which would have to be passed before hand.

1) Improvements in propulsion technology to the point where something almost identical in concept to the space warp method is the engine type placed on board the craft.

2)
The construction of an orbital spaceport, with a ship building facility which would permit the construction of truly enormous spacecraft, capable of housing city sized populations and the equipment and rations which would be necessary to keep them alive for long periods, including hydroponics areas, designed to permit the growth of food whilst in transit. This spaceship building platform would construct the enormous ship that we would all be travelling on.

3) The creation of systems which permit a group of explorers to identify objects as small as microbes, and scan a planet externally and internally, from orbit, rather than having to go into every situation blind.


4) I would only go, on the expectation that with the propulsion technology being as potent as it would have to be to entice me out in the first place, I could return whenever convenient to the mission of the ship and its crew.


5) And only on the basis that the exploration we are performing is to have no monetary value at all, and its results hidden from world governance and the corporate world, if the crew believe that reporting it would provide too much temptation to the feckless animals we often call our leaders.




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