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Measles Outbreak and What to Know

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posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 01:13 PM
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With the current measles outbreak in some areas --

Worst measles outbreak in decades sweeps New York as cases surge in Oregon, Washington and abroad

-- and the attendant fear mongering and faux outrage for the so-called "anti-vaxxers," I thought it might be a good time to post info on measles and nursing the health of you and yours if it comes your way.

The first thing to know is that measles can still be contracted even if you have been vaccinated, and the longer ago you were vaccinated, the greater the risk. If you have actually had measles, you are immune to the measles, so no worries for you!

The second thing to know is that most people come through a course of the measles just fine, and are up and about within a couple weeks. Those most at risk of serious complications are the immuno-compromised and those suffering malnutrition. And deaths are minimum. From 1989 to 1991 there were 55,622 reported cases of measles; of those, 123 died. From 2000 to 2017, there were 2,297 reported cases of measles; of those, 11 died.
Source

However, measles can still make one very miserable while they have it, so here is some information on what to do and what to watch for if you or yours do get the measles.

Signs and Symptoms

The symptoms of measles generally appear about seven to 14 days after a person is infected.

Measles typically begins with
--high fever,
--cough,
--runny nose (coryza), and
--red, watery eyes (conjunctivitis).

Two or three days after symptoms begin, tiny white spots (Koplik spots) may appear inside the mouth.

Source

Measles symptoms are similar to a common cold, with the rash breaking out a few days later:

Three to five days after symptoms begin, a rash breaks out. It usually begins as flat red spots that appear on the face at the hairline and spread downward to the neck, trunk, arms, legs, and feet. Small raised bumps may also appear on top of the flat red spots. The spots may become joined together as they spread from the head to the rest of the body. When the rash appears, a person’s fever may spike to more than 104° Fahrenheit. After a few days, the fever subsides and the rash fades.

What To Do

If you or your child has measles, keep in touch with your doctor as you monitor the progress of the disease and watch for complications. Also try these comfort measures:
Take it easy. Get rest and avoid busy activities.
Sip something. Drink plenty of water, fruit juice and herbal tea to replace fluids lost by fever and sweating.
Seek respiratory relief. Use a humidifier to relieve a cough and sore throat.
Rest your eyes. If you or your child finds bright light bothersome, as do many people with measles, keep the lights low or wear sunglasses. Also avoid reading or watching television if light from a reading lamp or from the television is bothersome.

Source

And, finally, a few cautions:

Take a fever-reducing medication, such as ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol). Never give aspirin to children, especially those with viral infections like measles, as it increases the risk of Reye's syndrome, a rare but potentially fatal illness that damages the brain and liver.

Skip the cold medication. Measles and colds are both respiratory infections, but the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) doesn't recommend over-the-counter (OTC) cold medicines for children ages 4 and younger (they're questionable for older kids too). "Research found that giving cold medicines to children didn't really alleviate symptoms. However, the medication could be harmful if given incorrectly," says Dr. Kronman.


Call your doctor if you notice any of these symptoms: high fever (usually around 103.5 degrees); abnormal behavior, such as hallucinations or extreme irritability; lethargy (unable to rouse a child or get a coherent response to a question); labored or fast breathing; headaches; seizures; or vision or hearing problems.

Source

I hope none of you ever need to know any of this... but better to know and not need to know than to need to know and not know!




posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 01:44 PM
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What to do.....vax your kids.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
What to do.....vax your kids.


As noted in the OP -- but obviously in need of repeating:


Yes, people who have been vaccinated can get the measles, but there is only a small chance of this happening. About 3 percent of people who receive two doses of the measles vaccine will get measles if they come in contact with someone who has the virus, according to the CDC.


The ONLY people who don't have to worry about getting the measles are the people who have already had it... like myself.

And whether measles patients have been vaccinated or not, measles patients need to be taken care of. Hence the OP.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 04:38 PM
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There are two reasons why widespread vaccination is a protection:

1. The obvious personal protection

2. Because personal vaccination is not 100%, the more people who are vaccinated the harder it is for a disease outbreak to become widespread because the chances of any one person's vaccination failing are so low that disease spread is seriously impaired -- herd immunity.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 04:39 PM
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So if you vaccinate against the measles, does that mean that only unvaxinated kids can get the measles?



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 04:46 PM
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Ask your parents or grandparents about the measles...or maybe you're old enough yourself to remember the 50's. Every kid got the measles---the Red Measles, the German Measles, Rubella.

Most Moms were home back then, and they took care of their children when they got these childhood diseases. Blankets were put over windows to keep the light out, because moms knew that light was bad for their little ones. I think measles would be more dangerous today because most mothers have careers and are too busy to provide that kind of nurturing and care.
edit on 9-1-2019 by queenofswords because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: amazing

It means that you have a population far less likely to easily get the measles overall.

Say you are vaccinated. That gives you a 85% (I don't know the real number, but it's high, just not 100%) chance of protection against picking up measles if you are exposed. Say further that most everyone around you is also vaccinated and carries roughly the same protection against exposure.

Not only is it highly unlikely that anyone will catch measles should an infected person wander into your community, but even if someone does get it, it will be hard for the measles to spread from that one person because of the unlikelihood of infection in everyone else around.

Not only that, but say there is a person in your community who cannot be vaccinated. Maybe they are allergic to something in the shot. That person is relatively buffered from exposure because they live with so many who are directly protected. They have a much lower chance of being directly exposed to measles themselves, and even if they do get it, they are less likely to spread it for the reason described above.

Herd immunity.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:17 PM
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a reply to: Boadicea

I don't want to sidetrack this thread but please don't try to blame it all on the "anti-vaxxers".
How many of the Illegal (Undocumented) border crossers were vaccinated before coming so freely into this country, and how many get vaccinated after finding a place to hide from ICE?
My bet would be none.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:32 PM
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a reply to: queenofswords




. I think measles would be more dangerous today because most mothers have careers and are too busy to provide that kind of nurturing and care.


Yes because sending the wimin folk back to the household kitchen would work so much better than vaccinations.....
edit on 9-1-2019 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:36 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
a reply to: queenofswords




. I think measles would be more dangerous today because most mothers have careers and are too busy to provide that kind of nurturing and care.


Yes because sending the wimin folk back to the household litchi g would work so much better than vaccinations.....


Uh?

My comment wasn't a suggestion. Did I say anything about sending mothers back to the "litchi g" (whatever THAT is)?



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: RedmoonMWC


I don't want to sidetrack this thread but please don't try to blame it all on the "anti-vaxxers".


Never!!! I am most definitely and unequivocally a loud and proud anti-forced-vaxxer... and if I still had young children I might very well be an anti-vaxxer in practice. The funny thing is, I'm pro-vax in theory. At best, when done right, it's a very natural way to use the body's own immunities for maintaining health. Unfortunately, in practice, I think we are giving too many vaccinations too young and too many at the same time, and that is creating long-term health issues.

There is no doubt that some people -- especially young children -- have adverse reactions to vaccinations. But as long as we deny or minimize or whitewash those issues, they will continue. And we never give ourselves the chance to work out the kinks, and make vaccinations more practical and efficient, and much less harmful.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: amazing
So if you vaccinate against the measles, does that mean that only unvaxinated kids can get the measles?


Nope.

...people who have been vaccinated can get the measles, but there is only a small chance of this happening. About 3 percent of people who receive two doses of the measles vaccine will get measles if they come in contact with someone who has the virus, according to the CDC.

And it seems even with the recommended two doses, it can wear off. (Unlike lifelong natural immunity from having actually had the measles.)

Have You Had Your Measles Shot? Maybe You Need Another



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: queenofswords


Blankets were put over windows to keep the light out, because moms knew that light was bad for their little ones.


Yes! My sister and I had the measles together, and we had bunk beds, so my mom put blankets around the bottom bunk and gave us flashlights with socks over them. We actually had a blast in our little cave. As I remember, much like the chicken pox, by the time the rash appeared, the worst was over. We didn't really feel sick anymore.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:51 PM
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Interesting as to why it's the three states, two close of course and one on the other side of the country.

Wonder if there's a connection, or intent such as a campaign in the works for booster measles shots for adults.



MMR is an attenuated (weakened) live virus vaccine.

CDC



Does MMR shed? MMR is a live vaccine and based on research, the measles and mumps attenuated viruses do not cause shedding. The rubella virus has been found to rarely shed into breast milk.

Source
How about a certain batch that had a propensity for shedding?



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:55 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin


Yes because sending the wimin folk back to the household litchi g would work so much better than vaccinations.....


It is what it is. I know us women are super awesome and amazing, and multi-tasking is second nature for us, but even we have our limits and can only be in one place at a time.

It's just a very sad reality for working moms and their children. There will be times when they will have to put their jobs before the best interest of their children.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: dreamingawake


Interesting as to why it's the three states, two close of course and one on the other side of the country.


As I understand it -- or at least what we're being told -- the NY patient brought it back from a trip to Israel. And at least one of the PNW cases was also from someone who came from a different country, but that country has not been identified. My best guess is south of the border though.


Wonder if there's a connection, or intent such as a campaign in the works for booster measles shots for adults.


Sure can't rule it out. And if it wasn't the plan before, it is now.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: RedmoonMWC

That's not entirely 100% fair. In third world and developing countries where people live closely with a lot of these diseases that we have forgotten what it's like to have but they see often, they will sometimes trek miles if they know there is a chance to get their kids vaccinated. If they hear about a local clinic coming up in a neighboring town or something because they want to spare their kids that misery.

The main problem they have is that their governments while often ironically promising "free" health care for all, cannot deliver anything like and there just isn't enough to go around. So often, they aren't exactly ignorant of vaccination or unvaccinated by choice. Sometimes, they will also get ineffective vaccinations thanks to corruption too. Drugs get mishandled or diluted into ineffectiveness, or they are sometimes even given drugs meant for farm animals, not humans.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 06:13 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin
a reply to: queenofswords




. I think measles would be more dangerous today because most mothers have careers and are too busy to provide that kind of nurturing and care.


Yes because sending the wimin folk back to the household kitchen would work so much better than vaccinations.....


Keep trying to push folks into your little hate box. It's amusing to watch.

Why do you support suffering children? ( see how ridiculous this sounds)



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 06:35 PM
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I wonder if measles is like chicken pox, that the later in life you get them, the more severe the reaction?

What happens when you get the measles? Is there a 5% chance of death? Does it produce a lasting impact that will follow you throughout life? I don't get it.



posted on Jan, 9 2019 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky

One of the measles can make you infertile. I forget if that's Rubella or German measles (they may be the same thing).




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