It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Why Does China's Yutu 2 Rover Look Different In Some Of The Pictures?

page: 2
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 5 2019 @ 05:36 PM
link   
a reply to: TheGreazel

Ah, the trap was set. The dark side of the Moon is always dark. The Far Side of the Moon ain't, as demonstrated by a lunar eclipse.




posted on Jan, 5 2019 @ 07:12 PM
link   
a reply to: paraphi

What does a lunar eclipse do to the far side of the moon?



posted on Jan, 5 2019 @ 07:36 PM
link   
I think 18% total of dark side can be seen during new moon. The other 82% never seen by man until apollo 8? Dark side and far side just same thing far as i know. Far side not really dark...it receives sunshine and some earthshine.

a reply to: roadgravel



posted on Jan, 5 2019 @ 09:47 PM
link   
Great detective work, guys. I don't think even the experts at UMSF realised that the rover turned 180 degrees to face the lander.

Hopefully, this means a photo of the lander is coming up soon.



posted on Jan, 5 2019 @ 09:54 PM
link   

originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: paraphi

What does a lunar eclipse do to the far side of the moon?

I think he misspoke and meant the solar eclipse. During a solar eclipse, the far side of the Moon is in full sunlight. Pretty much same during the "new moon" phase.

At total lunar eclipse, the far side is indeed the dark side.



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 12:30 AM
link   

originally posted by: wildespace
At total lunar eclipse, the far side is indeed the dark side.


As a matter of fact, it's all dark.

No, really!



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 01:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: Saint Exupery

originally posted by: wildespace
At total lunar eclipse, the far side is indeed the dark side.


As a matter of fact, it's all dark.

No, really!

Except the red light filtering through the earth's atmosphere.

As seen from an eclipsed moon, you'd be looking at all of the earth's sunrises and sunsets happening at that very moment.



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 03:33 AM
link   
I'm going to take a stab in the dark and suggest that the feature is something to do with fixing the panels in place during transit.

If you look at more detailed images from the first rover the features are there, and they appear to be cylndrical metal tubes. On the opposing panel there is a circle on the panel itself in the same place and some wire extending outwards. My suggestion is that during the journey the two panels are locked in place using these attachments and then released on their hinges once on the surface.



The only argument against that is that the one nearest the camera don't seem in quite the right place for that, but it could be perspective.
edit on 6/1/2019 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: extra



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 05:34 AM
link   
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo
In case people aren't aware, this rover is identical to the first Yutu rover (Chang'e-3).



The tubes and rods may be part of a sensor system that signals that the solar panels have been deployed.



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 05:41 AM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

Ah - so the panels move rotate outwards on their hinges, pull the wires out of the tube and that breaks a circuit saying "we're done"?



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 06:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
a reply to: wildespace

Ah - so the panels move rotate outwards on their hinges, pull the wires out of the tube and that breaks a circuit saying "we're done"?

No idea really, it's just a guess.



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 06:08 AM
link   

originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
a reply to: wildespace

Ah - so the panels move rotate outwards on their hinges, pull the wires out of the tube and that breaks a circuit saying "we're done"?

No idea really, it's just a guess.




Well mass costs money, so they aren't there for decoration. We could, of course, both be right



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 08:29 AM
link   

originally posted by: roadgravel
a reply to: TheGreazel



the term dark side is confusing it only means the dark side will never rotate towards the earth side.


Nope. The far side (well, most of it) is never toward the Earth. The dark side is toward the Earth at new moon.

Some people equate the far and dark side.

The far side (the side we can't see because it faces away from Earth) is sometime facing the Sun. This happens every 28 days or so when we have a "new moon" here on Earth.

As you said, the same side of the Moon always faces Earth. During the new moon, that side facing Earth is in darkness, and the side facing away from Earth (the far side) is facing the Sun, so that far side is lit up by the Sun.

edit on 2019/1/6 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 12:36 PM
link   
Was the term dark side of the moon coined from a conspiracy so Pink Floyd could have a cool album title.

In my time line, and yes I am bragging I am the only one special enough to notice these slips in time and dimensions, Trump built his wall before Pink Floyd released their album the wall.

Yes, I am being sarcastic
edit on 6-1-2019 by neutronflux because: Added and fixed



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 12:56 PM
link   
a reply to: Box of Rain

Thankfully you understand this.

Seems it's not common knowledge.



posted on Jan, 6 2019 @ 01:00 PM
link   
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Those just arent solar panels they serve another purpose. China was smart and mounted a low-frequency radio spectrometer. This is the only place where it can be used to scan the sky. Anywhere else the signals from earth will make readings impossible.

Who knows they could discover an alien civilization but at the very least we should get a good idea of where in the sky any radio signals may be originating from.




top topics



 
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join