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CNSA make history by landing on the moon

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posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 08:01 PM
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yeah, those PCs in mission control are most likely just terminals, altough for all we know, they can have more processing power than any PC you ever saw in your life. there's just no way of telling by looking at some short video.

as for the landing render, they even bothered with particles for engine exhaust and dust, so it looks like they're paying more attention to details than some folks here, that are so butthurt it's China that landed on the far side of the Moon that instead of cheering the effort that may benefit everyone, all they can do is mock them. pathetic, really.
edit on 3/1/2019 by jedi_hamster because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: Pandaram

Wow.

So you can spout off that the US never landed on the moon with hesitation, yet know nothing of what the Russians did?

Seems legit.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 08:20 PM
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www.spacetv.net...

damn. thought they've got a video from this mission, but it's from previous Chang'e.
edit on 3/1/2019 by jedi_hamster because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 09:12 PM
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a reply to: jedi_hamster

Fair enough about the terminals comment.

And I can respect that. Hopefully data collected is shared to a decent degree.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Thanks for providing those shots. That is true.

I did just have an idea though, 'drones' of all the rage nowadays.

Could we deploy quadcopters from a rover on another planetary body for aerial shots and easier exploration?? Is that something that would be feasible??

Of course there are a few obvious issues like batteries, wind, gravity, etc. But I wonder.
edit on 3-1-2019 by lightedhype because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 09:32 PM
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a reply to: lightedhype

Yes, the next Mars rover will have a helicopter to recon the landscape for good targets.


Yes, NASA Is Actually Sending a Helicopter to Mars: Here's What It Will Do


edit on 3-1-2019 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Lol, soon we're gonna have an entire complex worth of robots there. Might as well make it an autonomous project.

If we can ever overcome are currect technology regarding our comms to send and recieve over long distances, we may be able to finally control some of those machines back on Earth, checking out various things around Mars...



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 01:24 AM
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originally posted by: Arnie123
If we can ever overcome are currect technology regarding our comms to send and recieve over long distances, we may be able to finally control some of those machines back on Earth, checking out various things around Mars...


wah?? you mean we arent able to send communications over long distances????

what is considered long distance anyway?



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 02:23 AM
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CN[A]SA
potatoes and silkworms on the farside (darkside!=farside) of the moon.
3 pics , and a lot of CGI...
and a brownish moon for China.

This makes me question the moonlandings even more...



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 03:15 AM
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I want raw hi-def non-air brushed images of the UFOs and Aliens.
And better get the lighting right!



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 04:37 AM
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Well, all the bluster about landing/no-landing aside, the Chinese have actually accomplished something equally interesting with this mission. Prior to the landing of the Chang'e 4 probe, the Chinese established the Chang'e 4 Communications Relay Satellite in a "Halo Orbit" around Earth's L2 Lagrange Point. The unstable orbit is established in such a way to be 'around' the L2 point, not exactly 'on' the L2 point. This allows the communications relay satellite to stay above the Moon's horizon so it has a line of sight to Earth while at the same time having a line of sight to the Chang'e 4 probe on the far side of the Moon.

It's quite an accomplishment, and frankly not one which, to the best of my knowledge, even the USA has been successful at establishing to date. The USA has established craft at Lagrange points before (mainly for Sun observation), but not the L2 point behind the Moon. And I don't believe any of these were "Halo Orbits", but rather stationary.

I think many people here realize the far side of the Moon isn't really "Dark" (as some often refer to it). It get's as much sun as the side which faces Earth due to its rotation, but that 'far' side never faces Earth so communications to craft on the far side of the Moon was not possible until the craft re-emerged above the Moon's horizon and could establish comms with line of sight to Earth. For the early Apollo missions as an example, there was a comms blackout as the LEM transited the far side of the Moon. Any object on the far side surface would be in a similar comms blackout, but permanently (or at least until an orbiting satellite picked up the data and relayed it)...until now. Now, China can have real-time comms with their probe on far side of the Moon.

I thought this might be interesting for some of you.



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 05:04 AM
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a reply to: Pandaram

the sovients and americans - both sent unmanned probes in 1960s at least one US and 2 soviet were " mobile "

one soviet probe even launched a return capsule with samples



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 05:21 AM
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in the midst of all the crap - [ mostly the need to give history lessons ]

we should congratulate the chinese they have actually set several " firsts " in lunar explorating



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 06:23 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

That is impressive. Very proud of their accomplishments.



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: DoctorBluechip

Mission control rooms looking like copies of one another is not at all uncommon, especially when you consider the necessities presented to the designer, in terms of what priority set is being inflicted on their architecture and the position of stations and resources to serve those stations.

The bridge of an ocean going warship generally looks very similar, save for the specific models of equipment being used and the markings above or below each instrument panel, and for very similar reasons. When your needs are similar, the way you solve them tends to be similar. A mortar and pestle look very similar no matter which continent they are from, for example.



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 07:34 AM
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a reply to: lightedhype




Hell I don't know,


Just about sums it up, really.



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: choos

originally posted by: Arnie123
If we can ever overcome are currect technology regarding our comms to send and recieve over long distances, we may be able to finally control some of those machines back on Earth, checking out various things around Mars...


wah?? you mean we arent able to send communications over long distances????

what is considered long distance anyway?


It's not that we can't send comms over large distances. We still communicate with the Voyager probes, and they're billions of miles away. The problem is the time. It takes something like 40 minutes for our signal to get to Mars, so if you're trying to remote control a robot, that's not very practical. If you're a gamer, you know how a little bit of lag, like half a second, can get you killed? Imagine what 40 minutes of lag will do.

On the moon it's not as big of a problem because the light distance is only a little over a second.

As far as overcoming this limitation, good luck. You'd have to figure out a way to make the signal travel faster than light.



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 12:33 PM
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Question for the folks who think this is fake:

Why? What exactly do you think is so far beyond us that we wouldn't be able to land a robot on the moon? The physics and technology required are not that advanced. It's just expensive.



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 01:52 PM
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They can have the Moon. We'll fight them later over the Lagrange Points.



posted on Jan, 4 2019 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: dragonlover12
a reply to: LookingAtMars
Is it just me, or does the logo on the left look an awful lot like one from Star Trek?
I did not expect that


Da Feds will be wantin' their piece of the action.



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