It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What it would really take for the US to build the Wall if approved.

page: 1
5
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:28 PM
link   
This thread is my attempt to explain, to the best of my ability, what it would really take to build “The Wall.”

This is not a political tread, but rather a technical one, that explains the mechanics of what would happen in the US Government should our nation desire to build “The Wall.”

A few assumptions:

The total length of the continental border between the US and Mexico is 3,145 kilometers (1,954 mi). (1)

The first draft Homeland Security specifications for the wall is that it be either a solid concrete wall or a see–through structure, “physically imposing in height,” ideally 30 feet high but no less than 18 feet, sunk at least six feet into the ground to prevent tunneling under it; that it should not be scalable with even sophisticated climbing aids; and that it should withstand prolonged attacks with impact tools, cutting tools, and torches. The cost of the wall is estimated at $21.6 billion.(2)

Terms:

Authorization bills create, extend, or make changes to statutes and specific programs and specify the amount of money that appropriators may spend on a specific program (some authorizations are open-ended).

Appropriations bills provide the discretionary funding available to agencies and programs that have already been authorized.

For example, an authorization measure may create a food inspection program and set a funding limit for the next five years. However, that program is not funded by Congress until an appropriations measure is signed into law. The authorization bill designs the rules and sets out the details for the program, while the appropriations bill provides the actual resources to execute the program. In the case of mandatory spending, an authorization bill both authorizes and appropriates funding for a specific program without requiring a subsequent appropriations law. (3)


Federal Process:

Under the Congressional authorization an Agency would most likely be assigned as the lead for the Wall Program, with spending authority. For the sake of argument, I will propose that DHS gets the lead, and will be appropriated a small amount of “seed” money (say $30 million) to get the Wall Program going. The House Ways and Means Committee will perform Program oversight, requiring the Wall Program managers to report progress quarterly.

DHS will form a program office to oversee the multi-year process. They will also reach out to many other Departments of the Government for help. GSA is the real estate Agent for Federal projects to buy land and do construction. DOJ will be needed to help out with eminent domain to acquire the land and to negotiate compensation and face lawsuits. EPA would be involved to perform environmental impact studies. Many other Agencies would have a role in the Wall project. Each of these Agencies will have to negotiate and bilaterally agree with the Wall Program Lead (DHS), and sign Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with both parties agreeing with respective roles and responsibilities.

DHS will then commission a study of feasibility of several alternative routes and methods to construct the wall, the costs and benefits of each proposal, and possible market sources of selection for meeting their requirement. After the study is complete and approved, including acquisition lead time, award, study, review, public comment and presentation to Congress, about 18 moths have now passed.

DHS will now begin source(s) selection for the prime contractor to build the wall. With billions at stake, this will represent a major procurement. Source selection will take between 18-36 months. Assuming there are no protest, the Wall Program is now 54 months (4 ½ years) into the process, and not a single shovel has hit the ground. Congress can now begin releasing (appropriating) the remainder of the originally Authorized $21.6 billion as Appropriations.

As a point of discussion, you could shorten my estimated times by ½, and it would still put you past the 2020 elections.

Once again, I am not trying to make this a political thread for the sake of policy disagreement. Rather I am presenting the political realities of what it takes to perform large projects. Think about how long it takes to build any large structure, and aircraft or a ship. In private and public sector, it takes years once approved.

1.

2.

3.
edit on 3-1-2019 by FilthyUSMonkey because: (no reason given)

edit on 3-1-2019 by FilthyUSMonkey because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:35 PM
link   
a reply to: FilthyUSMonkey

roger waters knows.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:35 PM
link   
a reply to: FilthyUSMonkey

Haha 3,145km? Haha

Do you maybe mean 3.145 km?



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:40 PM
link   


What it would really take for the US to build the Wall if approved.

We're going to need a bigger boat (load) of money.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:46 PM
link   
a reply to: Peeple

???

Is this a pie reference?

???



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:47 PM
link   
Barbed wire, razor wire, and electric fence built all together with surveilance cameras and motion sensors. A couple more helecoptors with machine guns attached to shoot those who attempt to damage the fence. In a short time nobody will even attempt to try to get through the fence after maybe ten or twelve people get killed, word spreads fast.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:50 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

Maybe you should speak to Homeland Security to change the specifications for the wall?





posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:50 PM
link   
a reply to: FilthyUSMonkey

No. You used a comma. You said it's 3 km and 145 metres. That's very short.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:53 PM
link   
a reply to: rickymouse

iron curtain



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:55 PM
link   
I believe that the Department of Defense has authority over DHS regarding the building of a wall to protect our country's borders against foreign invader's drug/human trafficking. Its the military's responsibility to protect our country's borders against these foreign invaders. The United States Army Corps of Engineers will most likely build the wall not DHS, especially with the current political climate. All it would take is an Executive Order by the president in order to protect our national security. The president's emergency executive war powers are outlined in the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).
edit on 3-1-2019 by JBIZZ because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:58 PM
link   
Do we really need a wall though?

If you do some online research you bring up mostly propaganda articles pro and con the wall. It's hard to find the truth. What is the Truth?

It would appear that we might need some sections of wall/fence in certain areas. But, as we're seeing, we need some money for processing and personnel more, right now. We probably need some money for surveillance and other logistical support of our personnel there.

A wall/fence by itself is nothing.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 12:58 PM
link   
a reply to: FilthyUSMonkey

Less than what we spend protecting other countries!

Actually the investment (whatever it is) will pay for itself in a few years time. (Lives saved, Drugs Stopped...less public money spent on Welfare, Police investigations, and Healthcare costs for illegals and drug overdoses.)



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:04 PM
link   
a reply to: JBIZZ

OK. I was using DHS as an example. Any change in my hypothetical? How long does it take DOD to build and aircraft carrier or a new tanker/fueler aircraft? And DOD? Over runs?

DOD has no experience in this type of large scale construction. In fact, no one does, except the ancient Chinese....






posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:08 PM
link   
a reply to: carewemust

If you reread the post, I did not address if we need it or not. I made an assumption that Congress had already decided to build the wall. The point of the OP was to show what would likely happen after that point.

Please do not derail the thread into an argument over we need the wall or not. This is a tread about the mechanics of what would happen after the wall was authorized by congress.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:11 PM
link   
a reply to: amazing




A wall/fence by itself is nothing.


That's not quite true, especially if you look at it from the perspective of someone considering joining a caravan, walking thousands of miles, knowing that at the end lies a 30-50 ft wall. It's massive deterrent.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:11 PM
link   

originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: FilthyUSMonkey

No. You used a comma. You said it's 3 km and 145 metres. That's very short.



The total length of the continental border between the US and Mexico is 3,145 kilometers (1,954 mi). (1)


How would you delineate three thousand one hundred and forty five in arabic numerals?



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:12 PM
link   
How bout a virtual wall instead. Gun Turrets every 100 yards. You could have teams to do the shooting and even sell advertising space. Kinda like a hunger games or Roman games. Could be a real cash cow.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:16 PM
link   
a reply to: FilthyUSMonkey

Point. Or just say 3145 km. Or if you really have to 3.145
edit on 3-1-2019 by Peeple because: Add



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:18 PM
link   
a reply to: lakenheath24

Maybe you and Rickymouse should speak to Homeland Security to change the specifications for the wall? Maybe an unsolicited proposal the DHS's planning/acquisition office?






posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:19 PM
link   
a reply to: FilthyUSMonkey




what it would really take to build “The Wall.”


Bricks and cement i would say.








 
5
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join