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Apple stock crashing, cuts revenue guidance

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posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:21 PM
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As long as there is volatility there will be plenty of money to made in the market. Options allow you to be profitable regardless of market trends. Apple is a solid, American company. I will support them over Samsung and other Chinese junk any day. I just won't be buying their stock.




posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: Metallicus

nope but those put options are looking mighty tastey if you have calls coming in tomorrow



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:24 PM
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Not enough people want to spend over a grand on a phone they can get from other manufacturers for half the price.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth

It would be nice to realign our wants and true needs before this thing crashes. If we don't change ourselves first, how can we expect a new better system to emerge from the crises?



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky


Theirs only two things that can be done. Forgive all debt. or print. No doubt they will print.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: ClovenSky
a reply to: UKTruth

It would be nice to realign our wants and true needs before this thing crashes. If we don't change ourselves first, how can we expect a new better system to emerge from the crises?


Corporations don't care what you want. They tell you what you want then expect you to buy it.

I would buy an apple phone if it had a headphone jack, wasn't the size of a 90s calculator and their company wasn't trying to outdo Nike in terms of employer unhappiness and lack of welfare.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: anonentity
a reply to: ClovenSky


Theirs only two things that can be done. Forgive all debt. or print. No doubt they will print.


without a doubt

either the Fed makes debt easier again or the credit bubble burst



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:39 PM
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a reply to: anonentity

Ummm, what about default? I know they like to pretend that option doesn't exist after successfully raping the taxpayers with the trillions in bailouts from 2008, but maybe we should try that option again. Maybe even a little jail time for fraud. Man, what am I thinking, we can just create 0s & 1s out of thin air again and everything will be A OK. Responsibility is so pre 2019.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 07:05 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky

Consumer Debt


First, credit card debt rose due to the Bankruptcy Protection Act of 2005. The Act made it harder for people to file for bankruptcy. As a result, they turned to credit cards in a desperate attempt to pay their bills. Credit card debt reached its all-time peak of $1.028 trillion in July 2008. That was an average of $8,640 per household. Most of this debt was to cover unexpected medical bills. As a result, health care costs are the No.1 cause of bankruptcy.


Look, people are even MORE accountable to the debt they spend than before 2005. Surprise. Not. Another narrative fail.


econd, auto loans have increased so much because of low-interest rates. People took advantage of the Federal Reserve’s expansive monetary policy. The Fed lowered rates in 2008 to fight the recession. These loans are from three to five years. If the borrower fails to make payments, the bank will usually reclaim the underlying asset.

Third, school loans increased during the recession as the unemployed sought to improve their skills. In 2010, the Affordable Care Act allowed the federal government to take over the student loan program. It replaced Sallie Mae, the previous administrator. By eliminating the middle-man, the government cut costs and increased the availability of education assistance. It helped boost non-revolving debt from 62 percent of all consumer debt in 2008 to 73 percent in 2017.


Oh but it's because American's are wasting their money on luxuries right?

What American's spend their money on


You’ve probably heard that many Americans get themselves into financial trouble because they spend too much money eating out or buying clothes. Like many popular anecdotal observations, there’s a grain of truth to it—many people complain about money but still wear the latest fashions. But does that belief hold up to scrutiny?

Fortunately, we can test this claim. The U.S. Census Bureau continuously compiles a Consumer Expenditure Survey by asking a representative sample of Americans for detailed spending information. The Bureau of Labor Statistics then releases this data once each year. This survey enables consumers to compare spending over time and really see where money is going.



The survey for 2016 was released recently, and here’s what the numbers say: average annual household spending totaled $57,311 in 2016, a tidy 2.4% increase from 2015. But we can’t argue that Americans are living it up. On average, each household spent only $6,602 on entertainment, food away from home, and clothing in 2016. That’s about one-third of what we spent on housing last year, which was $18,886.



Transportation and health care were the other budget killers. The average American spent $9,049 on cars (buying them and taking care of them) and $4,612 on health care ($3,160 on health insurance premiums).



Housing costs continue to rise fast. Just two years ago, they were $17,798 a year on average. They’ve gone up almost $1,000 since then, or nearly 7%. Meanwhile, spending on clothes and transportation were both down in the past year—and gas spending was down sharply, thanks to lower oil prices.



For example, in 1961, Americans spent an average of $4,157 on clothing in today’s dollars. That’s down to $1,803 now. Americans spent nearly $10,000 on food in 1961. That’s $7,203 now. On the other hand, housing costs were about $12,000 in 1961, and they are almost $19,000 now, a 50% rise in inflation-adjusted costs. But it gets even worse when we consider what goes into housing costs.



These findings show that the U.S. economy is now driven by consumer spending, which accounts for about two-thirds of all economic activity—but even as incomes and spending pick up a little, that money isn’t going to food or entertainment. It’s getting sucked up by health care and housing. And that’s a big reason the postrecession economic recovery seems to be moving along at a snail’s pace.


Narrative fails, fails, fails!!!



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 07:11 PM
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Apple is rumored to be doing a stock buyback sometime after April with the new dividend priced in.
Depends on when the trade issues with Asia get resolved as per Trumps opinion.
With the various national Central Banks hiking interest rates in a competitive manner to manipulate export prices, that could take a while.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: Cauliflower

pretty sure Cisco still has another close to 20 billion in buybacks it's said it's going to do, I think it did around 6 billion in 2018 and it's stated it will commit 25 billion to buybacks in total



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 09:51 PM
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a reply to: toysforadults

I don't understand what the narrative was that failed? Could you clarify please?

And are we redirecting this to personal debt versus corporate/municipal debt which are completely different creatures?



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 10:51 PM
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a reply to: ClovenSky

Sorry I was actually responding to more than one post at a time



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 11:32 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
Not enough people want to spend over a grand on a phone they can get from other manufacturers for half the price.



totally agree, I've been trying to point out the changes in how people spend their income because the lion share of all of America's money is being spent on barely surviving



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 05:16 AM
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originally posted by: ClovenSky
a reply to: UKTruth

It would be nice to realign our wants and true needs before this thing crashes. If we don't change ourselves first, how can we expect a new better system to emerge from the crises?


That's entirely within our power.
By 'our', I mean each of us individually.
What actually makes people happy? The latest phone? The best and latest television? Expensive club memberships? The fastest car? A huge house? The umpteenth pair of shoes...? I reckon none of that makes anyone happy, they are only quick fixes for people searching for somtheing else.

Get a cheap phone (or better have no phone) and dump Apple or any other phone costing more than £20-£30, Switch off the TV, cancel cable, cancel club memberships, buy a cheap car that's reliable and gets you from a to b, live in a house just big enough, only have enough clothes to make sure you can stay cool, warm and clean.
Spend you time with your partner, or family, or friends....walking, talking, dinners indoors with friends and family, maybe a bit of cycling, listening to music. Build something... seriously, build something - a house, a garden structure, decking, a computer, whatever. Save money. Let it compund. Help some other people. Most of the best things in life really are free (or cheap).

Spend some money building up reserves of food and supplies. Being self sufficient is true freedom. Getting into debt to have the latest and greatest is pure slavery, which is why companies like Apple are pure evil.

edit on 3/1/2019 by UKTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 08:20 AM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
As long as there is volatility there will be plenty of money to made in the market. Options allow you to be profitable regardless of market trends. Apple is a solid, American company. I will support them over Samsung and other Chinese junk any day. I just won't be buying their stock.


All the parts inside either an apple or a samsung, are still all made by slaves kept in electronic cells, who occasionally jump out of a window.

Good morning USA. I've got a feeling that it's gonna be a.. wonderful day!



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 03:31 PM
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www.google.com... sting%2Fstock-market-today-apple-dow-jones%2Findex.html&psig=AOvVaw1vyq5LkeecmpiVNSWCGMKW&ust=1546637259261148

I really like the calls on gold abd silver and puts on the big tech stocks

Yeah buddy time to gamble



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: Ohanka
The tech giants can't fall fast enough.

Corporate oligarchy is the worst thing that happened to the modern world.


Totally agree, they squeeze out competition, offer no customer care or service, cheat where they can, push for changes in law which benefit them by paying MPs.

Makes me think a lot about what the true affects of the minimum wage is, these global firms who dodge taxation every year can pay the wage (and more) easily but competitors whose margins are smaller will struggle to adapt, leaving less competition than exists now.

Welcome to the world run by Amazon, pay workers bare minimum and harvest colossal sums of money to that 1%



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