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where do you draw the line at making your kids do something they dont want to do?

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posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: one4all


If you cant make 6 year old interested in music how can you get a kid interested in education or to employment...


she is super interested in music.

so far playing an instrument does not seem to be something at the top of her list.

but she loves music




posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears

originally posted by: one4all


If you cant make 6 year old interested in music how can you get a kid interested in education or to employment...


she is super interested in music.

so far playing an instrument does not seem to be something at the top of her list.

but she loves music




Does she enjoy singing ? The voice is an instrument. Maybe she would like a little karaoke machine ?



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:06 PM
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originally posted by: Sheye

originally posted by: TinySickTears

originally posted by: one4all


If you cant make 6 year old interested in music how can you get a kid interested in education or to employment...


she is super interested in music.

so far playing an instrument does not seem to be something at the top of her list.

but she loves music




Does she enjoy singing ? The voice is an instrument. Maybe she would like a little karaoke machine ?


she loves singing so much.
cant find a nice place for voice lessons.
that was my first thought.


we were going to get her a karaoke machine for christmas but we didnt.
prob should have

she is in her room all the time with her tablet doing sing alongs.
in the car we are always singing. the 3 of us are singing the entire time we are in the car together.

even if it is just the radio. my daughter is singing styxx and queen. classic rock # on the radio.

constantly singing.


see i thought getting her lessons would get her interested in playing an instrument. i could give her into # for guitar or bass or ukulele but probably not well.
i dont know how to teach music to a 6 year old


i would help her with her singing my i am a terrible singer. we just do it all the time



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:13 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

Sort of figured she loved singing. I did at that age as well. My parents got me into singing lessons and I found them boring. Maybe it was the songs and scales they taught, but it wasn’t for me.

There are some great tutorials online for many instruments as well as singing. Nowadays you don’t have to drag them to a boring teacher, they can learn much online, and it’s free.

I wish her the best whatever she decides to learn. I have a feeling you’ll all be learning together, which is awesome.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Stupidity makes me grumpy.....stupidity on purpose for the sake of a star & a flag is even worse.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears
I gave you advice....don't force your child to do anything they don't want to do. And for the record I would have no problem being called a asshole.....better than being known as a dumb A$$. Look it's capitalized and all.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

Don't get her voice lessons.

Do something else -- find her a choir. That way, she gets to sing, but she also gets the social aspect of hanging with a group of kids her own age. Find a good choir, and she'll get some rudimentary voice work too.

When I was in grade school, my school had a select choir of 4th, 5th, and 6th graders. You had to audition for it, but once you were in, you practiced once a week and had performances. We got to be one TV once a year, sang at some pretty big venues, and we were the first group of our age range and size ever invited to perform at Disney World ... so I got to go do that.

It was pretty cool.

But with formal voice lessons, it's just her and the voice coach.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 09:11 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

Graduating Berklee = Dropping out of Berklee


All joking aside, Berklee is fine. I attended for three years and got what I wanted out of the experience. Truth is most of the reason I dropped is because I'm a high-strung dude and city life was not at all right for me.

People who don't like Berklee might not like any school. Took me a while to realize that, but I am one of those types.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 09:14 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

This guy Rick Beato is IMO the best 'music teacher' I've ever come across and I've come across a few in 30yrs of playing guitar

the 'old way' music is taught is rubbish ... this guy teaches a 'logical' method kids can grasp ... watch his "circle of fifths" video and you'll see what I mean

I linked this vid coz it has his kid in it which i thought you'd relate to but I suggest you check out some of his others (like the 5ths) as he makes SO much sense ... I sure wish I'd had a teacher like him 30yrs ago! (instead of the 'old school' numpties I got) Thankfully I met a great jazz guitarist and we became good friends, now that guy taught me a Lot!

A 'good teacher' needs to be able to ' connect' with their students and vice versa or it aint gonna happen IME

p.s. btw, what's in it for you TST? Why do you want her to learn to play an instrument?



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 09:19 PM
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a reply to: JohnnyJetson

That thing about the teacher is spot on too.

You need to find one who loves not only what they teach so they can transmit their passion to the student, but who also loves the age range they're teaching. If you get a great teacher who doesn't like kids or who can't work well with them, then she's going to hate whatever it is she's learning.

And sometimes, it's not even about liking or not liking kids. Not every person works well with every other person.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 09:28 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: TinySickTears
But with formal voice lessons, it's just her and the voice coach.


This is a sometimes desirable approach, depending on the student.

There's a lady in my area who specializes in working with children, particularly those who have social deficits that preclude them from successfully integrating in choirs and other groups, but otherwise benefit greatly by learning to express themselves musically.

In this context, voice lessons are as much (or more) therapeutic as educational, and are a super option.

It all depends on the kiddo.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 10:21 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

I get that, but I'm assuming a normal kiddo here since we haven't been told otherwise.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

Singing, dance, and dramatic art is amazing for kids, it helps express emotion and gives key skills for adult life.
I was chatting with my 21 year old son the other day and he was glad that I suggested performing arts for one of his high school qualifications. He has a big job interview today and essentially all you are doing in a job interview is acting lol

He can go from working class local accent and dialect to BBC news voice in a heartbeat, as can I.
I got him into the local youth theatre age 5 and although he's a huge prop forward in our town's rugby team now, he can dance classically, and show emotion through his words, body language, and facial expression.

Performing art is amazing, I shared a stage with this guy when I was 15, I'd recommend drama for all kids.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 10:03 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Yo CCG. Thanks for your response.

I was thinking earlier today about people like your son, who challenge stereotypes. What I mean is, people whose obvious primary strength might be athletic ability, but also turn out to be math whizzes. Or sensitive, artsy types who have martial arts skill. In short, people who embody seemingly disparate qualities. It's inspiring, and reinforces the axiom "Don't judge a book by its cover".




posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses
Ah my best mate has been teaching kung fu for 20 years, he has an impressive lineage of teachers, hard as #, but he just says he is hard to hit lol, anyway, he is one on of the most sensitive male friends I have. If we are walking home on a night out and he sees a snail on the pavement/sidewalk, he'll pick it up and give it a lift to the nearest greenery so nobody steps on it.
I know exactly what you mean about challenging stereotypes, I know gangster big time dealers who will carry an old woman's shopping home if they are walking the same way. Life ain't black and white, it's all grey.
Good to know you see it in your world as well




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