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California's New Pet law

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posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 08:13 PM
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How many dogs are euthanized in California each year?

"The biggest decline was in dogs (from 3.9 million to 3.3 million). Each year, approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized (670,000 dogs and 860,000 cats).

The number of dogs and cats euthanized in U.S. shelters annually has declined from approximately 2.6 million in 2011."




posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn




ACC had no small dogs. They were quickly snatched up by the rescue organizations that charge more for some dogs than a breeder.

Hummm seems hard to believe.

You know when we buy from breeders



Only 1 out of every 10 dogs born will find a permanent home.

www.dosomething.org...



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 08:28 PM
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This would be a nonissue where I live. I can't even remember last time I was in a pet store that actually sold any sort of pet other than maybe fish. I wasn't even aware that asking how much is that puppy in the window was even still a thing.



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

I have no reason to lie. ACC is always my first choice when looking for a pet. I rescued both of my Ridgebacks, and my Lazarus. Lazarus was a cat that identified as a dog, and my dogs let him get away with it. Even my 5 Huskies.

Lazarus passed away 6 months after his 21st birthday in August.

I tried two local shelters and one 75 miles away. Very few small dogs, and those they did have had holds on them. Plenty of pit bull mixes.

Rescue organizations are a dime a dozen in my area and they charge from $350 to $600 dollars for their dogs.

In my area many are just money rackets.

Sorry, but is just the way it is around here.



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: NightSkyeB4Dawn

I totally believe you and I wonder if this is the case in my area. I never thought that other "organizations" would buy the more valuable dogs but I could totally see that happening. Now cats are a different story, they give them away for free here several times a year.



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 08:50 PM
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Glad to have my rescues. Dog #1 was adopted 14 years ago from the Devore, CA shelter. We think she's about 16 now. Most often guess from vets & groomers is that she's a Cocker Spaniel/Dachshund mix. I talked with the shelter management about our family - kids' ages, son w/ autism who paces, etc, and she matched us with sweetie Tish. Tish is now partly blind, partly deaf and very grumpy, but she's earned the right. Has the most beautiful eyes I've seen on a dog.

Dog #2 was from a rescue group. We fostered her first for a few months before making the decision. She's an American Bull Dog crossed with something smaller - she looks 100% ABD, but about half size. She's been with us 6 years now, is still timid at times, but very loving. Adopting her cost around $280, but that included spaying, all vetting, vaccinations and health checks. Cheaper than when I rescued a barn cat and had to pay all the vetting myself!



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: Phage

You can have a certain number of dogs--I believe it's up to 4 females, but don't quote me--without a license, according to my sister who's a USDA licensed breeder. Cats i have no clue about.
edit on 31-12-2018 by riiver because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 10:55 PM
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Most of the shelters here are inundated with pit and pit mixes. I feel bad for them and know that some of them would be great dogs, but at the same time, because we are in an urban area, I also know there are some who will be ticking time bombs too. Unless I really knew what I was doing with a dog, which I don't because I only ever had one dog in my life when I was a young girl, I wouldn't take that risk.

The rest are high energy mixes -- Aussies and the like. So you know why they're there.

I'll stick with cats. It's easier to luck into a good one through the shelter world.



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 10:57 PM
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Yeah but, are pets allowed to sh’it on the sidewalk?
Or only humans?



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 10:57 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Because cats just don't care.



The vast majority of "pits" that I've known have been fine pets. The trouble is their jaws are just so damned powerful. So much terrible damage, so fast.

edit on 12/31/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Not entirely true. Like everything in the animal kingdom, cats have their own ways, and you have to learn them. Generally, speaking, I'm an animal person. Most every critter I've ever kept has its way of expressing awareness and interest in you, from fish to snakes to cats to dogs. Dogs are only the most slavish and overt about it.

As to pits, as I said, as I have the least experience with dogs, that's why I'd steer clear. Dogs have their personalities just like everything else. Each one is its own critter, and the last thing I would want is a pit with a temper or one that I can't read properly and then accidentally set off for both our sakes.
edit on 31-12-2018 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 11:11 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I have a cat. I fully appreciate my servitude to her. She allows me to sleep on the same thing she does.


edit on 12/31/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 11:18 PM
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a reply to: MagesticEsoteric
What is this home insurance gig? I can own any animal and it won't affect my insurance. It must be a US thing.
On topic, my best mate has two old English bulldogs they are planning to have one litter of puppies once the male figures out how to do it lol
... £1500 per puppy.
My mate was poorly the other week and I didn't want to walk his dogs for him on my own, the female is worth two grand, imagine I lost her!



posted on Dec, 31 2018 @ 11:49 PM
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Tucker hates fireworks. He's freaking.

Gives me an excuse to stay home tonight though.



posted on Jan, 1 2019 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: Phage
I wish my dogs were a bit more sensitive to fireworks and gun noises.

They totally are unfettered by loud bangs and will go looking for the source. This is a bad idea as I live in the woods and folks playing around with guns are likely to miss identify five Huskies running in their direction.



posted on Jan, 1 2019 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Had same experience down in florida with the rescue animals ,all pitbull mix or not family friendly dogs. Had to go the same route when we finally got our puppy.

With a new born child i wasnt going to risk it with a pitbull, even though i know they arent all vicious or dangerous. The cat we got from the humane society.

They acted like brothers from day 1.
edit on 20131America/ChicagoTue, 01 Jan 2019 01:20:45 -0600000000p3142 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2019 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

"California just passed a law that" limits pet store sales of cats, dogs and rabbits to rescue or shelter animals only"

I'm not really much for over regulating people's behavior; I'd much rather see a better effort put in to change people's hearts and minds so that regulations like these aren't needed.

But if California must go down the road of bigger and bigger government reach (and we all know they must) than I say this law doesn't go far enough. They should disallow all for sale or show breading all together. There really is no difference between most puppy mills and "reputable" breaders when it comes to the biggest problem facing these pet animals.

Sure abuse is a problem, but we already have laws against the inhumane treatment of animals ... if that where the only problem than we need only enforce those laws and all the bad puppy mills would be shut down.

The bigger problem is the over population and breading of pet animals in general. There are just not enough homes for the number of pet animals we bread and as a result there is a large population of pet animals that are neglected and/or abused.

This new CA regulation is just a "have your cake and eat it to" approach to the problem. They want to FEEL like they are doing something positive but don't really want to tackle the problem... they don't want to upset all those posh "reputable" breaders out there.



posted on Jan, 1 2019 @ 02:09 AM
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a reply to: interupt42

Over 21 years ago, I got a cat from animal care and control. He was 3 weeks old and feral, so he walked in and called the place his. 3 months later, I got a Rhodesian Ridgeback from ACC. He had an incomplete ridge, so he was marketable, unwanted, and scheduled to be put down. I brought him home.

The cat let the new member to the family know who was boss and they lived together like litter mates for over 20 years.

I had other dogs during that time, but they accepted the existing pack positioning, and there was never a challenge to the cat's position. Now my girls had a skirmish or two, but never a problem with my boys, feline or canine.


edit on 1-1-2019 by NightSkyeB4Dawn because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2019 @ 06:19 AM
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originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy
a reply to: MagesticEsoteric
What is this home insurance gig? I can own any animal and it won't affect my insurance. It must be a US thing.




it all comes down to medical bills as to why insurance/pitbulls (and other breeds that could be a danger) is a thing. no insurance coverage and you could be on the hook for thousands of dollars in medical expenses if you dog attacks anyone, attacks someone who has been tormenting it, or even another animal. plus of course other damages in lawsuits over a dog bite/attack. and it's not even all to do with the bad reputation of pitbulls but also due to the more severe injuries possible because of the power in their jaws. and as insurance companies do, they have to take the reputation and possible liability such a dog poses into consideration with their coverage. you can buy insurance that will cover a dog like a pitbull, but you will likely pay a lot more for that coverage. and i understand some insurance companies will not cover them at all. now if you live somewhere that has socialized medicine it is not as big a deal since all medical related costs are taken care of by the government and not your insurance.


in fact one reason there are so many pitbull type dogs in shelters is due to the liability they are. and things like insurance companies telling people they have to get rid of the dog, or loose coverage. now i don't know about California, but there are many areas where dog breeds like pitbulls are actually illegal to own. which is another reason for so many to be in these shelters. since if you move to one of those areas you have to get rid of the illegal dog. and i have even been hearing about rental units now that while some may actually allow pets (something that is an issue all of it's own), they may specifically outlaw breeds like pitbulls. and again that sometimes has to do with the building/property owner's insurance.



posted on Jan, 1 2019 @ 06:25 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: JAGStorm

What if the pet isn't fancy?


Well then you darn well MAKE THEM FANCY. A fanciers license is not something to take lightly. You're either committed to the job, or they take your license and send you running home with your tail between your legs.




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