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Update: Six barges carrying coal have sunk into the Ohio River

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posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 09:27 AM
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Three barges are still stuck on the dam at the Falls for the Ohio. One of those is stuck in one of the gates of the dam. Six other barges have been recovered. “Currently one of the barges is capsized over the dam and it’s preventing one of the gates from closing," U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Commander Michael Metz said. "Obviously it’s a very very large concern, but the Coast Guard, along with the responsible party and the Army Corps of Engineers are working tirelessly to safely remove that barge.” The Coast Guard said water at the dam fell by one foot on Friday, causing recovery efforts to be put on hold.


Update: Six barges carrying coal have sunk into the Ohio River

On Christmas a towboat that was pushing the coal barges hit the bridge. There were 15 coal barges in all. The government employees were working around the clock to free the barges and contain the coal spill. They are not being paid at this time due to the shutdown.

Seems coal would be easier to contain and clean-up than other fuels. Officials said it will not effect the drinking water, but around 1800 tons of coal has been dumped into the river and that can't be good.









posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Good news is it won't affect our drinking water, nor the wildlife and eco system if they haven't tempered the coal.
edit on 30-12-2018 by odzeandennz because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 09:52 AM
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Too much Christmas cheer for the tug driver?



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 09:56 AM
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Coal can be used as a filter. It may clean up the river.



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Exactly.
Beautiful Clean Coal



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars


You said "On Christmas a tow boat that was pushing the barges hit the bridge."

If it's a tow boat, doesn't it PULL the barges?

edit on 30-12-2018 by KansasGirl because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: KansasGirl
a reply to: LookingAtMars


You said "On Christmas a tow boat that was pushing the barges hit the bridge."

If it's a tow boat, doesn't it PULL the barges?


No, they are pushed.

Picture



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

LOL, good point.
Pushboat just dosen't sound right



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 11:13 AM
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The barges are the tow. The towboat is a boat working with the tow.



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 11:53 AM
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Sabotage by the anti-coal Lobby !! 😣



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 02:18 PM
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Along with other duties I had as a deckhand, I used to drive a river-based cruise ship up and down the Columbian and Snake Rivers, all the way from Astoria to the Idaho border. There was quite a few times that cargo ships and tugboats would hog up the river and create a "maritime pile-up" (as we liked to refer it as) preventing us from getting to our destinations on time.

I realized real quick that it's 24/7 focus and attention while driving a ship, so I'm guessing that tugboat driver must have been snoozing at the wheel for this to happen.



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

I feel like this wouldn't be any worse than dumping that much sand or rocks into a river.

Am I wrong?

Coal isn't toxic. People eat coal. Hell I have coal in my body wash.



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 05:17 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Charcoal yes, not sure about stuff fresh out of the ground, it would be full of fossil fuel still..I think anyway.
edit on 30-12-2018 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: scraedtosleep

Charcoal(from burnt wood or bone) is used to filter, I believe it can be ingested in cases of poisoning. I don't think coal is safe to eat, it contains fossil fuel, metals, carcinogens..etc



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 06:14 PM
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originally posted by: scraedtosleep
a reply to: LookingAtMars

I feel like this wouldn't be any worse than dumping that much sand or rocks into a river.

Am I wrong?

Coal isn't toxic. People eat coal. Hell I have coal in my body wash.


I think some or all coal has heavy metals in it. Seems that should not be a problem in the river if they clean most of it up. Now eating coal could be a different story



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 06:23 PM
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An interesting read..it would appear not much has been studied, but seems fairly safe to say coal would contaminate to some degree..I'm talking coal here, not charcoal.
www.sightline.org...



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

Had no idea that charcoal and coal were so different.



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: scraedtosleep

I might not of known the difference myself, but many years ago I was trying to source bone charcoal for filtration. Seemed hard to find, so I dug into the subject..no pun intended



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

Good link

Looks like the coal dust is the biggest problem. In a large flowing river that relatively small amount of dust should dilute and hopefully not cause much of a problem.



posted on Jan, 3 2019 @ 05:20 PM
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Another coal barge has dumped it's load into the river other barges are still stuck at the bridge.



A seventh coal barge has sunk and salvage operations soon will be underway at the Falls of the Ohio, a week after a line of the coal carriers broke away in a crash at the Second Street bridge, the Coast Guard said Wednesday.

The towing vessel Debbie Graham was pushing upstream 15 barges, which carry 1,500 to 1,800 tons of coal each, when it went off course and struck the bridge. Six of the barges were recovered and nine drifted downstream to be pinned against the dam, said Lt. Cmdr. Michael Metz, a Coast Guard spokesman.

The cause of the incident, which took place downstream from Louisville’s drinking-water intakes, is under investigation. Metz declined to elaborate or estimate how long the probe could take.

The Debbie Graham’s owner, Tennessee Valley Towing, will be responsible for the recovery costs. The Paducah company didn’t respond to messages seeking comment.




Seventh coal barge sinks at Falls; salvage to start soon







 
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