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Jupiter Fly-By and how it has changed

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posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 04:26 PM
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This is a great fly-by of Jupiter. Our imaging of Jupiter is so much better now. It looks like a different planet almost. When I think of Jupiter I think of how it looked in the Voyager images. Jupiter itself has also changed, the red spot has become a lot smaller.

The fly-by looks a little fake and that is because it is. All the image data is real and it is presented in a realistic way. The probe can't take enough images in one pass for a smooth video. This video was made with images from many passes by Juno.

This is what I think of as Jupiter.


I have not been able to find a good Juno image showing the whole planet. You would think NASA's Photojournal would have one from Juno but no luck. The best I could find is the above video with Juno images of Jupiter's poles and the rest from Cassini.

Here is a Earth observation of Jupiter.


Another observation from Earth.








edit on 29-12-2018 by LookingAtMars because: add




posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Really cool.
Imagine being caught in one of those storms, wouldn't even have to be the Red Spot.

Just awesome.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: watchitburn

A huge hydrogen and helium storm, floating in some kind of craft that rides the currents like waves. I hope we get there some day.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

I prefer calm seas with a gentle tradewind. Of air.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 06:15 PM
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What does it look like UNDERNEATH all that stuff??



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

Pretty dark, probably.

Sunlight at that distance isn't much and it's pretty heavy cloud cover.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: KansasGirl

Pretty dark, probably.

Sunlight at that distance isn't much and it's pretty heavy cloud cover.


Very dark with the flashes of lightening.



edit on 12/29/18 by dragonridr because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

At one time we thought it to be a Diamond the size of the Earth, now through It is known that the interior of Jupiter contains liquid hydrogen, which can only exist under tremendous pressures.
edit on 29-12-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

Metallic hydrogen. Weird stuff. Way weirder than mere liquid hydrogen.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Indeed.

I would prefer to come across the diamond all the same.
edit on 29-12-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

De Beers would have you assassinated.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 07:29 PM
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So it's solid? Jupiter is a solid mass?



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

Not as observed.
Not as theorized.



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: KansasGirl

Under that kind of pressure and temperature, extreme metallic liquid hydrogen behaves like an electrical conductor, the perfect superconductor to be more precise. Researchers think metallic liquid hydrogen is present in large quantities in the hot gravitationally compressed interiors of not just Jupiter but also Saturn and some of the other exoplanets.
edit on 29-12-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 10:54 PM
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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_VII

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Dec, 29 2018 @ 11:58 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars
Project Lucifer FTW!
blue as our new second sun.
2010... Kubrick's win wink nudge nudge say no more!



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 02:47 AM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
The fly-by looks a little fake and that is because it is. All the image data is real and it is presented in a realistic way. The probe can't take enough images in one pass for a smooth video. This video was made with images from many passes by Juno.

It's actually images from a single pass, but overlayed on a 3D globe and animated that way. That's what I recall the producers of such videos saying.

Here's a very awesome-looking one from Sean Doran: www.youtube.com...



I have not been able to find a good Juno image showing the whole planet. You would think NASA's Photojournal would have one from Juno but no luck. The best I could find is the above video with Juno images of Jupiter's poles and the rest from Cassini.

I think it's because of Juno's orbit. It has a polar orbit, and makes close passes over Jupiter's day side, so when it's far away enough for a whole planet picture, you're seeing a crescent or the night side of Jupiter.

We're so used to seeing Jupiter fully lit by the Sun that half-jupiter or crescent-jupiter images look a bit weird.

Here's a nearly-full Juno image (actually a mosaic), but it still looks different from what we're used to: www.nasa.gov...

For me, the biggest surprise from Juno images was that Jupiter has blue poles. And it's extra-cool when you realise they're blue because you're looking through Jupiter's hydrogen atmosphere (it's blue for similar reasons our sky is blue).
edit on 30-12-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 07:17 AM
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I have always wondered why the hell they can't put a damn video camera on a zillion dollar probe. People are hip to the fake looking stuff these days. Even if it is an accurate representation, it isn't actual footage.



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: BrianFlanders

ITS CALLED BANDWITH ………

Figure the number of pixels per picture, then multiple by 24 or 30 times a second to get a streaming video

Transmitting streaming video at this distance would consume enormous amount of power

Solar cells at this distance are not efficient Probes use radio isotope generators employing decay heat from
Plutonium to power a spacecraft systems

More power means larger heavier spacecraft

Transmission times back to earth take minutes if not hours to arrive



posted on Dec, 30 2018 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Thanks for the info.



For me, the biggest surprise from Juno images was that Jupiter has blue poles.


I like the blue poles and the detail of the storms is amazing.



It's actually images from a single pass, but overlayed on a 3D globe and animated that way.


Thanks for correcting that, looks like I misread this.


The animation here is fake, but it is a good representation of reality. They can only take and send back so many pictures each flyby, so what they did here is move the pictures such that the flyby looks smooth. You can see the lighting change quite clearly, every change is a new picture. So at any one moment, what you see is real data. However the animation has been "faked" to make it nicer to watch. Conspiracy loonies go crazy over releases like this, but this is just for public outreach (to inspire the next generation, etc). The actual science is done on the raw data.







edit on 30-12-2018 by LookingAtMars because: change




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