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The Kurdish sate

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posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 12:59 AM
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10/10 for Trump pulling out of Syria.

I have meet some Kurds her in Australia, great people.

If they are to have any chance in the power vacuum, form a constitution that will rally the people. In time get your finances and stamps in order. Will be happy to see you you at the next Olympics.

If not, change is the only constant.




posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 01:06 AM
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This, the Kurdish State, is the sum of all fears collectively for turkey, Syria, Iraq, Iran.

All of them have large, multi-million-strong Kurdish minorities, who would vote to succeed from their current states and form "Greater Kurdistsn."

Don't hold your breath



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 01:41 AM
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a reply to: Graysen

I don't hold my breath, bugger all I can do for what is happening on the other side of the world.

But if I was Kurdish in Kurdistan, I would be working on a constitution right now before the wolves show up.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 01:50 AM
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a reply to: kwakakev

Exactly: gain sympathy, show how smart and free you are.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 01:52 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

Totally, you are getting it.

Will kill if required, but ain't seeing it here.
edit on 22-12-2018 by kwakakev because: last sentence



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:09 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

To be straight up about these Kurdish, a bit slack in some regards. Considering they have held their ground through all this middles east incursion, well not too stupid. Could have formed a constitution years ago, maybe they tried, some rough drafts out there I expect. Live and let die???



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:11 AM
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a reply to: kwakakev

You can't fight and contain all conflicts for everybody. That's stailing the development.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:16 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

Exactly. Either the Kurdish get their act together or they don't. Now is their window. With the US pulling out of the region... Time will tell.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: kwakakev

Well I'd assume Saudi Arabia, the Kurds and Israel form an alliance. Whoever wants to stand up against that, the second the US is out would be your opportunity.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:31 AM
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a reply to: kwakakev

From what I can see, the US did generally support the Kurds, Sure the situation is complex and like any tribe there are a few idiots. generally thought, they are good neighbors. The geopolitical scene has recently changed and now it the tine to pull your socks up or remain complacent.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:40 AM
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a reply to: Peeple

Ain't that simple. Saudi and the Bushes where strong in oil. Now the US is getting energy independent again, Trump is tough on business. Israel is another barrel of dead fish, lot of war and ra ra. To be straight about it, it is the white Australia policy, apartheid and similar systems all over again. Sure the incompetence of brown people is frustrating at times, but do we just kill them all as an answer?

I get Trump building this wall, we do lock our doors when we go out, just doing it on the state level. Some immigration is good, but too much does hurt.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:41 AM
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a reply to: kwakakev

On reflections, if the Kurds what going to hook up with anyone, yeah.
edit on 22-12-2018 by kwakakev because: changed 'one' to 'on'



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 02:53 AM
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Just to try and be balanced and politically correct, the incompetence of white people gets to me as well. I don't kill them for it though.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 03:21 AM
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originally posted by: Peeple
a reply to: kwakakev

You can't fight and contain all conflicts for everybody. That's stailing the development.


From what I see of state interactions, It is about conflict resolution. Either the Kurds get it together to sort out their own conflicts, or they don't. I am sure in some local way they continue to fix things up as best as they can, but to be taken seriously on the global stage they do need a constitution, some form of legal agreement to sent in the boots before one of its neighbors do.


edit on 22-12-2018 by kwakakev because: spelling 'seriously'



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 04:20 AM
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I do have to love these short threads, so no one has nothing????

For now its in the hands of the Kurds. Get your $#!t together boys, or someone else will.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 08:42 AM
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So the top topics are guns and muller. This a predominantly Americans site. No one really cares about Syria and the Kurds. Mostly US, some British and other Commonwealth colonies visit here, if you speak English. I would put a few dollars on North Korea at least watching, but they have enough dramas these days.

So again, Trump gets a 10/10 for pulling out of Syria. Few if any local US really care. The troops there would have a gag order on them. Maybe one day their stories will come out. For now the war mongers are crying about lost profits.

For a globalist agenda, having the option for nuclear war heads while on the USS Enterprise would be a good thing as captain of that ship. Here on Terra ferma, ra ra whatever. From my take on it, humans would have blown themselves up many years ago. Thankfully they are not in charge when push comes to shove on the galactic level.

The Kurdish window will not be open for long.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 01:48 PM
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Peshmurga was receiving covert US aid. I think one of the conditions was that they not actively pursue state-hood. Kurds I knew said the US told them "they would look like a second ISIS."

One of the quotes I heard a lot from them was "Kurds have no friends but the mountains,"

The men I knew were brave and realistic in equal measure.



posted on Dec, 23 2018 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: Graysen

Sounds like there are many actors against a Kurdish state including Turkey, Iran and other regional powers. In such a political charged melting pot of a region, having another seat at the political table will just further bog down and complicate discussions, along with reducing the share of one's pie.

With the Kurdish culture having such strong identity bonds, it does seam a little strange there is no state to represent them. Maybe this is just a part of the Kurdish culture, to be stateless, I don't know and feel incompetent here.

As there are thousands of different ways to Brexit, I am sure there are just as many to a Kurdish state. It will be tough, dangerous and a lot of resistance thrown up against it. If they can hold it together it will demonstrate they have what it takes. With its people and culture already here it's not too far off. With the fear and hostility that the idea of a Kurdish state does bring, sounds like many others know it is a possibility.



posted on Dec, 23 2018 @ 08:04 AM
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Outside of American and Western (European) culture, there are a lot of ethnic groups who don't have their own state--some have been states less for hundreds or even thousands of years.

Another example is the Assyrian community. They have an antagonistic relationship with the Kurds over religion. The Assyrians have been stateless since about the 3rd century AD. The majority of Assyrians have fled the ME since 1980. They are mostly Aramaic-speaking Christians (their copy of the gospels is in Syriac, the language Jesus actually spoke), and it has been the policy of everybody to kill them.

There are several refugee Assyrian communities in the US, but most of them fled to Russia; the US is seen as assisting their their oppressors (including the Kurds), while Russia extracted agreements from Syria not to harm Assyrians/Syriac speakers, or at least let them emigrate to Russia as part of the price of Russian assistance against ISIS.



posted on Dec, 24 2018 @ 07:14 AM
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a reply to: Graysen

Thanks for those insights.

The Gypsies is another stateless culture that came to mind, their nomadic tendencies makes it hard to form any strong local foundations. They got persecuted bad during WW2 along with many other minority groups. Sounds like the Kurds have somewhat held their ground, with the rough terrain being a defense for them. I know there have been a lot of them that have also moved around. Trying to hold onto some of their culture while in other communities.



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