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3D reconstruction of Pumapunku temple

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posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 09:12 AM
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I really enjoyed this article.

It does my heart good to see others take interest in this place. The amount of work that went into this project is impressive.
Virtual Reconctruction of Ancient Temple





Unfortunately, the ruins of Tiwanaku, and the Pumapunku temple in particular, have been ransacked repeatedly over the past half-millenium. Archaeologists have virtually no idea what the structure actually looked like. None of the blocks that once comprised the original structure are currently located in their original place, and many of them are badly damaged or decayed. What’s more, most of the stones at the site are too big to move, making further observations difficult. And field notes left behind by archaeologists over the years are considered too opaque to conceptualize.


What makes this effort unique is the use of 3D printed models. They basically made Legos and tried to make everything fit. Granted, it's at best an educated guess. The results look pretty cool, however.



Satisfied with their Lego-like configurations, the researchers keyed their creations into an architectural modeling program, culminating in a single hypothetical model of the temple complex. This wasn’t terribly difficult, as the construction methods used by the Tiwanaku people, and how they formed their incredibly geometric stones, are well documented, explained Vranich. But the exercise yielded some new findings. “What we found out is that it appears they were making prototypes for each type of stone type, and then would have copied one after the other. It’s almost like it was a pre-Columbian version of Ikea.”


The other piece of this effort seems to be crowdsourcing. They are making the 3D models available to the public. That way, if some budding young mind with 'visual/spacial' gifts feels frisky, it might get better.



“The blocks will also be made available online,” said Vranich. “My hope is that other people will print them out and through the wisdom of crowds, we can find additional matches and continue to reconstruct the form of [another Tiwanaku] building known as ‘the temple of the Andes.’”








posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 09:22 AM
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a reply to: LedermanStudio

They need to render this in a 3D plug in for browsers. I would like to see it in 3D and see really what it looked like.



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 09:25 AM
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a reply to: LedermanStudio

That's pretty cool! Great find.



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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Neato, looks like a minecraft auto-farm.

How old is this temple again?



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 06:36 PM
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Seems like a weird way to build something like that. What were in all the little niches? Candles? Skulls?



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 10:34 PM
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a reply to: LedermanStudio




What’s more, most of the stones at the site are too big to move, 


How the hell did the builders move them then?



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 07:50 AM
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originally posted by: Archivalist
Neato, looks like a minecraft auto-farm.

How old is this temple again?

Dates to around 500 AD.

Harte




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