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The difference between Russians and Americans

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posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 01:31 PM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

But what about the rise of the Russian oligarch after the fall of the soviet union? That would have to indicate some large scale corruption within the government itself. Didn't Putin make public announcements to his reform of the oligarch that was sucking Russia dry? Or are you saying that just at the present time, the government is less corrupt?

If it is not or less corrupt compared to other 1st world governments, how do you explain that?




posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 01:34 PM
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originally posted by: ClovenSky
a reply to: RussianTroll

I very much look forward to that long discussion. When you said that our CIA is the major source of conspiracy theories, are you saying the majority don't exist and are creations of fiction? Or that these theories are real, perpetrated by the CIA?

From your answer, I gather you think that the Russian government is independent with no strings attached to any global body. Does that hold true do to the influence of Putin or is it due to the structure of the government itself? Was V Lenin part of the invasion that Stalin cleansed or did the bolshevik invasion never gain a foothold in the government?


According to conspiracy theories will be a separate post. Wait a bit)))

I do not consider the president and the government of Russia independent. Of course, they are highly dependent on many factors and structures. But I think that on the way to real independence, Russia needs to change its colonial Constitution, which the US has imposed on us. And then according to the law, to change the political and legal system.
Bear in mind, I am by conviction - a supporter of Russian autocracy, a monarchist. But at the same time I am a supporter of legal measures and countering any revolutions.

Lenin was forced to maneuver among many parties representing the interests of various states and international structures. Stalin in his youth was a gangster, robbed money for the party. Then he was an apparatchik - he controlled the cards in the game. He was never a bright personality and orator. He had no charisma like Trotsky, organizational skills like Sverdlov and political maneuvering like Lenin’s. I don't really like him. But his undoubted merit is simple. He understood with his mind that if he wants to lead the state, then this state simply must be. And the Bolsheviks wanted to make the Russian people and the state a means for the victory of the world revolution. Therefore, he overcame incredible resistance, called the Russian national cadres into the party and with their help overthrew the power of internationalists-globalists.
edit on 20-12-2018 by RussianTroll because: correct



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

If, as you say, there are no oligarchs in Russia, then how do you explain people like Roman Abramovich, Mikhail Prokhorov, Leonid Mikhelson or Vladimir Potanin (among numerous others)? And these are just under Putin. Under Yeltsin there was Boris Berezovsky, Mikhail Khodorkovsky and Alexander Smolensky (among others).

ETA - Abramovich is one of the more interesting stories. Even though he was one of the first people to recommend Putin to succeed Yeltsin, he would eventually get crosswise with Putin. In order to regain the good graces of Putin he would eventually agree to take on the role of Governor of Chukotka, investing his own money in the revitalization of the area. Now, clearly a man like Abramovich would normally have nothing personally to do with a place like Chukotka (aside from the gold and diamonds there), but he did. Even though it was phrased as an "election", it was really more of a voluntary financial exile. It is a truly interesting story, but there is something even more interesting about it; why did anyone even care?

And, I believe the answer to this question can be found at 66.266304N,179.214478E

edit on 12/20/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

I work with Russians. I agree with your OP.

It did take some getting used to. My coworker lately is an older Russian man. He is not very Americanized though he has been here since the early 90s.

I like that useless conversation is avoided. I like that Russians can be honest and say what they think.

I find them to be hardworking, very professional and generally fair with the workload.

A bad Russian is usually VERY BAD if he is. Criminal and slick. They are few and far between though. Overall you get family minded people that remind me of older generations that we used to praise in the US.

I have come to appreciate my Russian coworkers. They rarely let me down and often bring intelligence and competence to any situation.

There are things I don't like that revolve around being pleasant. Russians are overwhelmingly respectful though so its all minor and more to do with personality.

I wish our countries got along better. It's a terrible loss that our leaders are so antagonistic towards each other.


edit on 12 20 2018 by tadaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: RussianTroll

If, as you say, there are no oligarchs in Russia, then how do you explain people like Roman Abramovich, Mikhail Prokhorov, Leonid Mikhelson or Vladimir Potanin (among numerous others)? And these are just under Putin. Under Yeltsin there was Boris Berezovsky, Mikhail Khodorkovsky and Alexander Smolensky (among others).


Under Yeltsin, the oligarchs were. That same Berezovsky ruled both the president and the government. In the 1990s, we had the so-called "seven bankers" - 7 bankers who ruled the country.
Under Putin, everything is different. He rules the country. Those of his friends who became magnates with him, such as Pugachev, in any attempt to become oligarchs, were immediately subjected to repression and emigrated to London. Putin broke up the oligarchs. He acted very hard. Example - Mikhail Khodorkovsky. He began to buy whole factions for the money of the deputies of parliament in order to make Russia a parliamentary republic, head the government and just become an oligarch. But Putin harshly stopped him, like all the rest - friends and non-friends. There are no oligarchs in Russia right now. Any businessman who wants to buy Russian policy will be ruined and destroyed. Any!



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 02:45 PM
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originally posted by: tadaman
a reply to: RussianTroll

I work with Russians. I agree with your OP.

It did take some getting used to. My coworker lately is an older Russian man. He is not very Americanized though he has been here since the early 90s.

I like that useless conversation is avoided. I like that Russians can be honest and say what they think.

I find them to be hardworking, very professional and generally fair with the workload.

A bad Russian is usually VERY BAD if he is. Criminal and slick. They are few and far between though. Overall you get family minded people that remind me of older generations that we used to praise in the US.

I have come to appreciate my Russian coworkers. They rarely let me down and often bring intelligence and competence to any situation.

There are things I don't like that revolve around being pleasant. They are overwhelmingly respectful though so its all minor and more to do with personality.



Thank. Among the Russians there are good people and bad ones, like everywhere else. Naturally, I want to show here more positive qualities of Russians. But to deny bad qualities is stupid. Good people everywhere will find a common language)))



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 02:51 PM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

I posted this as an edit to my other post, but I'll post it again here so you see it...

Abramovich is one of the more interesting stories. Even though he was one of the first people to recommend Putin to succeed Yeltsin, he would eventually get crosswise with Putin. In order to regain the good graces of Putin he would eventually agree to take on the role of Governor of Chukotka, investing his own money in the revitalization of the area. Now, clearly a man like Abramovich would normally have nothing personally to do with a place like Chukotka (aside from the gold and diamonds there), but he did. Even though it was phrased as an "election", it was really more of a voluntary financial exile. It is a truly interesting story, but there is something even more interesting about it; why did anyone even care?

And, I believe the answer to this question can be found at 66.266304N,179.214478E



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I will complement you. Abramovich financed Russian sports. In particular, the Russian national football team and the football club CSKA. When the football federation had a problem with the payment of Fabio Capello, Guus Hiddink and Dick Advocaat, they always turned to Abramovich and he always paid. Perhaps he bought his loyalty and stressed his unwillingness to be an oligarch.
edit on 20-12-2018 by RussianTroll because: correct



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 03:12 PM
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In SA I have limited contact, so take me with a pinch of salt.
But looking at the gym (over 18 policy with locker-rooms anyway).

But I find Russian men are very proud of their masculinity.
Even in the male locker room for example, they are not shy.

Today here, mostly only men over 40 are like that (they went to the army).
Younger is always the American model.
So shy they would shower in shorts if they could.
Not proud of their masculinity anymore, as such at all.
And I mean the way you carry yourself, and that men have a different body-image to women.



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 03:16 PM
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OK, a generalization, but I have heard it commented upon in general.

In the Yeltsin-era (showing my age again) Russian men were still regarded as hopeless failures and alcoholics.

But now they are often portrayed as models of hyper-masculinity and fitness.

And yes, I admire that.
Trying to do the same.



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: halfoldman

Many Russian women have told me that in men they are excited by an organ of 2 Russian letters - "ум" (mind).
And the mind of men comes with age)))



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

You see, I may know a little more of Russian custom than it appears.

Like I said, I love your culture.

"За нашу дружбу!"


edit on 12/20/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 06:03 PM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

I don't do any of the stuff that yuppie did.

I don't talk loudly, I don't drink hardly ever at all, I don't think coconut water has anything to do with yoga pants, and I don't smile all the time.

This lady sounds incredibly annoying and stupid.

Please don't blame me, a real American, for this woman's BS antics.

I personally have lived with Russians before and I like them and think that I identify with most things an average Russian male my age would.

That woman in the interview is just dumb.



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: halfoldman
OK, a generalization, but I have heard it commented upon in general.

In the Yeltsin-era (showing my age again) Russian men were still regarded as hopeless failures and alcoholics.

But now they are often portrayed as models of hyper-masculinity and fitness.

And yes, I admire that.
Trying to do the same.


But that has nothing to do with Russia per se.

Any man anywhere can choose to either be a drunk or a hunk.
Hahhahahah



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 11:07 PM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

Hi RussianTroll,
I very much enjoyed your post. I have always loved learning about other cultures, and communicating with people from distant places. I agree with what some others have said, that you can go to different places in America and you would think you were in a whole different country because of the diversity!

I live in South Carolina, and I'm afraid I would be one of those 'crazy people' smiling while I walked past you on the street. I don't know why, it just feels right to me. Like I'm showing you that I value you as a person, enough to give you a kind smile to brighten your day. Other places in America, they would find it as strange as you do!

I live in a small southern town, so "Happy Hour" is not a custom like it is in big cities or college towns.

The yoga thing cracked me up! I do yoga several times a week, and never drink coconut water or wear Luluroe leggings. That part was really funny to me!

I'd like to hear more about daily life in Russia. Like I said, I am fascinated by different cultures. What do you eat for breakfast? For lunch? For dinner? Do you eat dinner really late, like some European countries? Do kids still play outside a lot or are they all addicted to TV and Internet like in America? Do you have a vegetable garden? What else about your life would help me to know you better?

Cheers!
edit on 12/20/2018 by new_here because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 01:22 AM
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a reply to: new_here

Hello!
It is very pleasant to listen to such words and see interest in oneself. In principle, life in Russia is not much different for people. In the morning - getting up, walking with a dog, breakfast - and not working. In the office, a light lunch at a cafe, after work home, to quickly taste what today was prepared for dinner by the wife))).

I am an engineer, I used to work in an office, but now I have remote work on a computer and I work at home. Maybe soon I'll be back to the office.

To understand the soul of Russians, I will give you a statement by a priest, Archpriest Andrei Tkachev, a highly respected priest in Russia:

"The Russian man loves to come to the edge and recoil. He needs it, do not feed him with bread. The Russian man will not run from the precipice, but he will come and look at it. And then, when his head spins and the horror engulfs, rushes back and understands everything at once, without words. Like this: it won't come to the edge - and it will live a child all its life. And it will do - and grow up, the lost years will catch up in a second. Only it is dangerous. After all, not everyone recoils. Many are falling. "

The character of the Russians is brought up in childhood. I read a lot of Western media and I know that now your generation of young people are gentle "snowflakes" who cannot be held responsible for their actions. We are not, although trends exist. I want to give you the post of my friend in LiveJournal about how we were raised in childhood.
___

If you were a child in the 60s, 70s or 80s, the beginning of the 90s, looking back, it is hard to believe that we managed to get to today.

In childhood, we drove cars without seat belts and airbags.

Our cots were painted in bright colors with high lead content. There were no secret covers on the medicine bottles, the doors were often not locked, and the cabinets were never locked.

We drank water from a column on the corner, not from plastic bottles. No one could have imagined riding a bike in a helmet. Horror. For hours we were making carts and scooters from boards and bearings from the landfill, and when we first flew from the mountain, we remembered that we had forgotten to attach the brakes.
After we drove into the thorny bushes several times, we dealt with this problem.
We left the house in the morning and played all day, returning when the street lights were lit, where they were.

All day no one could find out where we are. There were no mobile phones! It is hard to imagine. We cut arms and legs, broke bones and beat out teeth, and no one sued anyone. Happened all. Only we and no one else were to blame. Remember? We fought to the blood and went bruised, getting used to not paying attention to it.

We ate cakes, ice cream, drank lemonade, but no one got fat, because we were running and playing all the time. Several people drank from one bottle, and no one died of it. We did not have gaming consoles, computers, 165 channels of satellite television, CDs, cell phones, the Internet, we ran to watch a cartoon with the whole crowd to the nearest house, because there were no video recorders either!

But we had friends. We left the house and found them. We rode bicycles, made matches on spring streams, sat on a bench, on a fence or in a schoolyard and chatted about what we wanted. When we needed someone, we knocked on the door, rang the bell, or just came in and saw them. Remember? Without demand! Yourself! Alone in this cruel and dangerous world! Without security! How did we survive?

We invented games with sticks and cans, we stole apples in the gardens and ate cherries with bones, and the bones did not germinate in our stomach.
Everyone at least once signed up for football, hockey or volleyball, but not all were in the team. Those who did not fall learned to cope with frustration. Some students were not as clever as others, so they remained for the second year. Control and exams were not divided into 10 levels, and the scores included 5 points theoretically, and 3 points in reality. At recess, we poured water on each other from old reusable syringes!

Our actions were our own. We were ready for the consequences. Hiding was not for anyone. The notion that you can pay off the police or pay off the conscription is almost non-existent. Parents of those years usually took the side of the law, can you imagine !?

This generation has created a huge number of people who can risk, solve problems and create something that was not there before, simply did not exist. We had freedom of choice, the right to risk and failure, responsibility, and somehow we just learned how to use all of this.



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 01:38 AM
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originally posted by: muzzleflash
a reply to: RussianTroll

I don't do any of the stuff that yuppie did.

I don't talk loudly, I don't drink hardly ever at all, I don't think coconut water has anything to do with yoga pants, and I don't smile all the time.

This lady sounds incredibly annoying and stupid.

Please don't blame me, a real American, for this woman's BS antics.

I personally have lived with Russians before and I like them and think that I identify with most things an average Russian male my age would.

That woman in the interview is just dumb.


My friend, how can I blame you for the actions of other people? I'm just trying to understand Americans, and you understand us. So that we become closer)))
thank



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 05:07 AM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

Another great post!

It's funny, I could write your exact same post about growing up here in America too!

It was just the same as you've written.



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 05:35 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: RussianTroll

Another great post!

It's funny, I could write your exact same post about growing up here in America too!

It was just the same as you've written.



Это говорит о том, что у нас больше общего, чем различий))



posted on Dec, 21 2018 @ 07:01 AM
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a reply to: RussianTroll

RussianTroll,
When I read the words your friend wrote for LiveJournal about being a child in Russia years ago, it sounds like I was reading about my own childhood. We are more alike than we are different!

What kind of dog do you have? We have a young Visla (Miklos) and an older dog that is a mixed breed but mostly Labrador (Meggie.)




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