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Tornado in Seattle

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posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:53 PM
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Yes you read right, tornado touch in Seattle today. This happen extremely rare. Several homes are damaged.

Seattle Tornado




posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: whiteblack

Seattle, welcome to my world.

I HATE those things, they are absolutely terrifying, and I've lost many friends to them.

My best wishes to you, Seattle, and may you never have another.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:31 PM
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Absolutely amazed at the woman in the one video pushing a baby stroller who doesn't even attempt to get herself and the kid to safety. Dunno if she doesn't realize that's a tornado and not just a bad storm, or if she's just that oblivious.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:52 PM
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originally posted by: Subrosabelow
...Dunno if she doesn't realize that's a tornado and not just a bad storm, or if she's just that oblivious.


Pretty much the same thing, innit?



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 12:31 AM
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originally posted by: incoserv

originally posted by: Subrosabelow
...Dunno if she doesn't realize that's a tornado and not just a bad storm, or if she's just that oblivious.


Pretty much the same thing, innit?


Ummmm NO
And trust Me I know.
Clearly you have not experienced one before. Many videos on youboob to watch.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 03:00 AM
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Okay, as a German who has never experienced a tornado live, having seen many of them on video, I have some questions:

Is it possible for a concrete or even "just" masoned house to withstand a tornado (not F5, just a normal one)?

What would be the damage besides the roof and shingles?

Are the winds extreme enough to damage windows without them being hit by debris/trash?

What about cars outside? Thrown over? Or just damaged by debris?



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 05:13 AM
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a reply to: whiteblack

No, you read that wrong, not in Seattle. Quite a distance from Seattle actually.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 05:48 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
Okay, as a German who has never experienced a tornado live, having seen many of them on video, I have some questions:

Is it possible for a concrete or even "just" masoned house to withstand a tornado (not F5, just a normal one)?

What would be the damage besides the roof and shingles?

Are the winds extreme enough to damage windows without them being hit by debris/trash?

What about cars outside? Thrown over? Or just damaged by debris?


A concrete or masonry (brick) house is going to fare better in a "normal" tornado, but roofs are susceptible in many F-levels. It can range from shingles to just lifting the whole thing off. There is a huge pressure differential, so a long brick wall could buckle and once stuff starts coming apart it's over. Cars can be flipped. Both high wind and debris can damage the windows (again, the pressure differential). Debris can't be avoided, so it is kind of irrelevant and is one of the major contributors to the danger of the whole thing. That is the reason you are supposed to cover up with mattresses blankets, helmets, whatever.

The main thing that is lost on the outside world is that these are extremely localized in damage except in extreme cases where there is a large, long duration event. It is for sure devastating where it hits, but you will see houses on one side of the street leveled and those on the other untouched sometimes. There are plenty of neighborhoods in "Tornado Alley" that haven't been near a tornado in recorded history. I'm not trying to downplay it, but there are far more people living there who have never been impacted than have.

They are extremely dangerous localized storms and should not be taken lightly.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 06:00 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
Okay, as a German who has never experienced a tornado live, having seen many of them on video, I have some questions:

Is it possible for a concrete or even "just" masoned house to withstand a tornado (not F5, just a normal one)?

What would be the damage besides the roof and shingles?

Are the winds extreme enough to damage windows without them being hit by debris/trash?

What about cars outside? Thrown over? Or just damaged by debris?


It's not so much the wind that'll get you as it is the flying debris.

Here's a short video demonstrating a 2x4 being hurled at three different types of wall installation (skip to 2:00 to go straight to the demo);



I definitely wouldn't want to be on the receiving end of that!




posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 06:27 AM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope

Do a Youtube search for Moore Oklahoma tornado. They have been hit twice and where the 1/2 mile wide twister crossed it even tore up concrete roads.. There was nothing left of the brick homes other than rubble spread everywhere. It looked like an fuelair bomb went off in a very large area !


edit on 727thk18 by 727Sky because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
a reply to: ManFromEurope

Do a Youtube search for Moore Oklahoma tornado. They have been hit twice and where the 1/2 mile wide twister crossed it even tore up concrete roads.. There was nothing left of the brick homes other than rubble spread everywhere. It looked like an airfuel bomb went off in a very large area !



I was in Norman just south of Moore when that sucker hit. We couldn’t even evacuate because the roads had people leaving jamming them up. At first they predicted that I was right in the path.
We got everything we could and lined the bathroom like it was a war zone. At the last minute the storm turned towards “Poor Moore”. You can still go and see the path to this day.
edit on 2/19/2013 by Allaroundyou because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 09:52 AM
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originally posted by: dalepmay
a reply to: whiteblack

No, you read that wrong, not in Seattle. Quite a distance from Seattle actually.

Actually, it is about 20 miles west from Seattle. Close enough. If I change title Seattle to Port Orchard, nobody know where it is.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 10:00 AM
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A tornado went through by my cabin the one house had a 2x4 through it's porch roof from the inside out. You could tell because the shingles were poked up. It was from the neighbors garage that was scattered.




posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 12:24 PM
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It actually hit Port Orchard, which is across the bay from Seattle. My Uncle lives there and the tornado hit on a street called Fair Winds Lane.

We had snow in November, ( in Arkansas) and they had a tornado. I think someone needs to get Mother Nature a gps, because she is obviously lost



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope

Halfswede did a pretty good job of explaining the damage.

A tornado creates damage by two things: air pressure differential and wind. The core of the vortex is extremely low air pressure, and when it moves across a house, especially an airtight house, that pressure differential can cause the house to blow out. It's not like the house literally explodes in the common sense of the term, but the house will leak air to the outside catastrophically. This is what causes initial roof damage, as the escaping air will literally lift the roof off the house. It used to be common knowledge that if tornadoes were roaming the area, crack some windows to let the air escape. Of course, some people didn't understand the concept of "cracking" a window open, so they would open them up completely and let wind-borne debris inside... so the authorities stopped suggesting that.

Most houses built around here use "tornado ties" (known in hurricane country as "hurricane ties"), metal brackets that are used to secure the roof structure to the wall structure to help prevent the roofs from lifting off.

In addition to that, the winds can easily reach 200 mph or more, much faster than a large hurricane (a tornado can actually be thought of as a tiny but super-intense hurricane). I have seen pine needles embedded into tree trunks. So what you have is a triple event for a house: extremely high winds pressing on the walls, immediately followed by a burst of very low air pressure pressing the walls outward, followed by more winds pressing inward. That series of pressure changes can destroy a building completely, especially when accompanied by solid debris from previously destroyed structures and loose objects.

Yes, the winds can pick up cars and toss them like toys, mainly in an F-3 or above. F-4 and above can throw trucks around. Luckily, there are very few F-4s and even fewer F-5s (locally referred to as "the finger of God").

As to masonry withstanding the forces, it depends on a lot of variables. How well sealed is the building? How old is the masonry (masonry tends to degrade over time)? How thick is the masonry? Is it solid or hollow (sealed hollow areas actually make things worse)? So it's hard to answer your question on that.

If you have never seen a tornado up close, consider yourself very blessed. I once looked up into the middle of a small one as it jumped the mountain and came across where my Dad had just driven into a ditch to try and avoid it. That was the most evil mass of twisting anger I have ever witnessed, like something out of Hell itself. And it was probably an F-1.

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 02:27 PM
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I blame Walmart for this. Here's why: The storm was produced at very low altitudes happened in a very isolated area, and occurred after a sun break. All of this points to the parking lot at the Walmart next door to being the reason for this event.

The sun break heated up the asphalt, then the storm cell's cold air mass moved over head, finally the heat from the parking lot raised up and created the vortex that started the funnel cloud to occur. It may seem far fetched but you can read about some of the dynamics of tornados here (HERE, it's a Phys.org story on this)

The vortex was created under 10.000ft which is unusual in of it's self, but given that it was created after the cell passed a parking lot, and the quick life span of it, I think more research needs to be conducted on how urbanization's affected albedo can create these micro vortexes, and what could be done to mitigate the effects.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: ManFromEurope
An F3 tornado passed right over my house very recently. Fortunately my house fared remarkably well, only losing one window and a couple shingles, and a little soffit/fascia. My next-door neighbors had many windows broken, fences, a garage moved off it's foundation, 5th wheel camper smashed to bits. None of our trees survived. 5 were uprooted and one was snapped in the middle of the trunk. We were lucky. The neighborhood it went through a half mile before mine looks like no-mans land during ww1.

I was curious and prepared with my 'go' bag and boots on, trying to spot it from my front door but it was too dark out when I first noticed the 'freight train' sound. Once you first hear that sound you have another 30 seconds before you are at Mother Nature's absolute mercy. As the sound got louder I noticed it came more from the sky rather than the horizon. Something lit the sky up orangish (either lightning, electrical transformers, or the sun being just below the horizon, i dont know) and I saw the tornado bearing right for me so I RAN to the basement.

As i was moving to the basement I noticed my ears popping, similar to a long descent down a hill or being in an airplane. I covered in a basement corner and just listened with my adrenaline pumping and senses on full alert. The house above me was shifting and rocking and making noises it should never make. My interior doors slammed shut upstairs and the pressure draw hurt my ears so bad I was trying to cover them with my hands. I could hear my soffit tearing out, debris smacking up against my house, I felt my neighbors chimney collapse over in my driveway from my basement, and then it was over, and not a second too soon.

I ran outside about 20 seconds after it passed and couldn't belive the destruction. The tornado was a half mile wide F3 with 155 mph winds. The path of destruction is also about a half mile wide right through town. If you are out of this path, you have shingles, branches, hail damage, etc. Inside the path you have houses like mine and houses that are gone, most somewhere in between.

There is a video on YouTube of a tornado going through a car dealership and the cars look like speckles of glitter in the tornado, hundreds and probably thousands of feet up. Most windows are damaged by the debris but there are a few I have seen that were pulled out with the glass intact and the frame ripped out. Its more like a vacuum than a blowing wind. The wind is just all the air molecules at ground level getting sucked horizontally before it sucks upwards. Some things get sucked up without ever being in the path of the wind.




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