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An Electromagnetic Event Impacting The United States Is Inevitable. Get Ready Now

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posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:43 PM
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originally posted by: Lumenari
a reply to: infolurker

Buy land that is at least 100 miles from a city over 50k people, make sure you have water available, put in an orchard, get gardens going, work with your neighbors so that there is in place a barter system.

Buy land where the wildlife population is 100 times bigger than the people population.

Get off-grid, set up solar, micro-hydro... have enough parts to last for 50 years.

Put up enough food to last until you can stabilize your food crops.

If you are doing all of this just to retire and putter around in your garden, then most SHTF scenarios don't really matter.



That's what I did pver 25 years ago - then we got divorced. Mountain property with a well and 2 creeks, bordering 5,000 acres of national forest with no roads and not accessible by even 4x4's. Blueberries, blackberries, persinmmons, pears, walnuts, apples and plums all grow there today. The best laid plans oft go astray...

To the point of the OP I do worry why they're bombarding us with this now.
edit on 18-12-2018 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:44 PM
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originally posted by: sine.nomine
I just think big cities would be the worst off. I know it would be a high percentage, but even local communities would try to rig something together to get some kind of power generation. People farm, have gardens, trap animals, solve problems...

All I said was it seems like a high estimate. Maybe I'm wrong, I don't know. Humans have survived without electricity before, if you all weren't aware. But yeah, city dwellers would be up the proverbial creek.


People can survive without electricity, but the problem is so much of society is dependent upon it and the know how to survive has been lost for the most part.

There is only about 3 days worth of food on grocery store shelves. Trains, trucks, and all transportation would be gone. No supplies or food would be coming. Think about how people riot on black friday because they can't get some hot new toy. Imagine how they are going to behave when they find out no more food is coming.

The elderly and sick would be gone within a week or so. They can't get their medicine to keep them alive. Some medicines require refrigeration which won't exist anymore.

Many small towns would start putting up road blocks because of all the people trying to escape the cities. Looters and robbers everywhere.

We haven't even gotten into the disease that would result from the dead and lack of sanitation. Good luck surviving up north without provisions and heat during the winter.

I absolutely believe 90% would be dead within one year....



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:44 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
I've been on a post-apocalyptic book binge the past year or so. I must have read about 50 books on the subject.

The gold standard for this scenario is One Second After by Bill Forstchen. While the book is fiction, he delves into great detail as to how 90% of the population will die and all the other issues that will crop up if the entire grid goes down. The story covers:

The sick and infirm can't get their medicine
Lack of transportation means no food or any supplies. The general scarcity of goods
Lawlessness, nomadic gangs
Hordes of people escaping from cities into small towns and rural areas
Societal breakdown in general... no functioning government

It is pretty eye opening and a very good read (or listen if you like audio books). The book does a good job showing how at first, no one thinks it is a big deal but after about a week, the sh*t starts hitting the fan when people realize help isn't coming and supplies start running low.


Sounds like you've been reading some good stuff. Also sounds like, I'd assume, most people writing on this subject agree. Population and systemic reliance is the Achilles heal of survival.

Its not a hard conclusion, it's as simple as the less human contact you have, the better chance of survival you have.

Good to know my years of social ostricization will pan out in the end.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:47 PM
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originally posted by: NarcolepticBuddha

originally posted by: MisterSpock

originally posted by: NarcolepticBuddha

originally posted by: MisterSpock
Not my precious social media....ohh no.

I'm ready though. Have 2 pallets of funions and a months worth of beer.



Ew warm beer? Kill me now.



You take an afternoon, dig a 6 foot deep hole and put your brew in your new fridge.

Another example why city folk would just curl up and die without such necessities as electricity and hipster beard waxes.


Truth be told, if I had the money I'd learn how to live off the grid. I'm a wage slave barely making rent from month to month. Most people are.

I envy those who are fortunate enough not to be dependent on anyone or anything. It really is my American Dream.




So uhhh...you wouldn't share those funyuns with me if I dug your fridge hole?








I sure would for you NB. You can shelter here until you tire of me and try to kill me in my sleep(unsuccessfully). Then its 3 bags of chips. A gallon of water and 100 rounds of ammo and you have get sent packing.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:48 PM
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originally posted by: Edumakated
I've been on a post-apocalyptic book binge the past year or so. I must have read about 50 books on the subject.

The gold standard for this scenario is One Second After by Bill Forstchen. While the book is fiction, he delves into great detail as to how 90% of the population will die and all the other issues that will crop up if the entire grid goes down. The story covers:

The sick and infirm can't get their medicine
Lack of transportation means no food or any supplies. The general scarcity of goods
Lawlessness, nomadic gangs
Hordes of people escaping from cities into small towns and rural areas
Societal breakdown in general... no functioning government

It is pretty eye opening and a very good read (or listen if you like audio books). The book does a good job showing how at first, no one thinks it is a big deal but after about a week, the sh*t starts hitting the fan when people realize help isn't coming and supplies start running low.


Excellent book, btw. Everyone should read it.

What people like me worry about is the urban areas.

So week 2 or 3, you have a bunch of bands that can keep the thing going for awhile by scavenging.

By month 3 there are one or two bands that keep the thing going by scavenging.

By month 6 there is one band of hardened by fire super predators that cannot scavenge anymore and are headed out to the rural areas to scavenge.

And there comes my problem.




posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:51 PM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals

originally posted by: Lumenari
a reply to: infolurker

Buy land that is at least 100 miles from a city over 50k people, make sure you have water available, put in an orchard, get gardens going, work with your neighbors so that there is in place a barter system.

Buy land where the wildlife population is 100 times bigger than the people population.

Get off-grid, set up solar, micro-hydro... have enough parts to last for 50 years.

Put up enough food to last until you can stabilize your food crops.

If you are doing all of this just to retire and putter around in your garden, then most SHTF scenarios don't really matter.



That's what I did pver 25 years ago - then we got divorced. Mountain property with a well and 2 creeks, bordering 5,000 acres of national forest with no roads and not accessible by even 4x4's. Blueberries, blackberries, persinmmons, pears, walnuts, apples and plums all grow there today. The best laid plans oft go astray...

To the point of the OP I do worry why they're bombarding us with this now.


You sound like a kindred spirit only my plans came to fruition.

So sorry to hear that.

However, you are not dead yet!

I did it once and blew it, then did it again in my 50's.

So get to work!




posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:51 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

Meh, I dont think most of us would worry about that.

I'd put 10 gallons of water, 200 rounds of 556 and 30 MREs on 2 country boys against a gang of 100 urbanite sloths.

The point being, for every 20 miles out of the city they get, their odds are halved, or quartered for survival.
edit on 18-12-2018 by MisterSpock because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

Excellent Thread!
I will add a couple links that may interest you
and others.

www.dhs.gov...

www.dhs.gov...

No one ever thinks to ask for a generator and a dozen 5 gallon cans of fuel for Christmas! SAVVY?
Better to have it and not need it that to need it and not have it.

S&F



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:56 PM
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a reply to: Edumakated

Up north has an abundance of wildlife and these things called trees you burn...

I moved from down south to up here just because of the disease and population issues you would face in that scenario.

Much less the wildlife that is poisonous or wants to eat you, or the flora that wants to kill you too.

Now that I think about it though you are right... everyone in the event of a SHTF scenario should immediately drive to Louisiana!!!



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 09:57 PM
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originally posted by: Wildmanimal
a reply to: infolurker

Excellent Thread!
I will add a couple links that may interest you
and others.

www.dhs.gov...

www.dhs.gov...

No one ever thinks to ask for a generator and a dozen 5 gallon cans of fuel for Christmas! SAVVY?
Better to have it and not need it that to need it and not have it.

S&F


Fuel is a tough one. I keep about 20 gallons around, but even that wont do much. Get you and your gear about 2 or 300 miles more rural. But even then youd better have a fixed, welcoming, destination.

I wouldn't waste fuel in a genny. Buy you a few days before you have to think right about food storage. Better to have heat, propane, on hand to cook and dry all your raw meats.

Before hitting the road of course.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:02 PM
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Personally, my biggest issue that would stall my preparation would be picking weapons layout.

That's my Achilles heal. Too many options and too many possibilities.

They might find me sitting in my arsenal trying to pick the top 5 weapons for deployment.

I really need to be more realistic on that stuff. I can make a case for why I'd need my 458 win mag with 200 rounds of solids.

This isnt tremors for #s sake.......



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:03 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

I'd love to get to work but I'm disabled, so...ya know.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:05 PM
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if your on meds that are hard to come off of like beta blockers it will be one hell of a ride

only hope is to raid a pharmacy chances are the drugs everyone else is after wont be the life saving kind but that wont make it easy



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:05 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

Party at your place!



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:06 PM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1

You mean the funiouns?

It ain't much, so bring pizza and we can talk.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:09 PM
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originally posted by: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
a reply to: MisterSpock

Party at your place!


Honestly though, even with societal collapse, I'd still be a hell of a party host.

I'm a sucker like that. I'd give away just about all I have if it meant a few good nights of food and drink.

Live for the day...and all that.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:13 PM
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originally posted by: Wildmanimal
a reply to: infolurker

Excellent Thread!
I will add a couple links that may interest you
and others.

www.dhs.gov...

www.dhs.gov...

No one ever thinks to ask for a generator and a dozen 5 gallon cans of fuel for Christmas! SAVVY?
Better to have it and not need it that to need it and not have it.

S&F


Propane..... propane is your friend.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: Asktheanimals




To the point of the OP I do worry why they're bombarding us with this now.


Because our grid in this country is absolute crap honestly, before I joined the military and before my stint in the healthcare industry, I worked with my dad doing over head power.

Compared to most other 1st world countries our grid is an absolute sh!t show and it wouldnt take much to take it down.

Texas has the most secure and stable grid out of everywhere in the US, and is independent of the rest of the US.

That being said, I know ever since my dad was a younger man (40 years a lineman) they have complained how volatile it is, and that it needs to be remedied that was in the 60s, and theyve done pretty much screw all since then to remedy it.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:19 PM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock
Personally, my biggest issue that would stall my preparation would be picking weapons layout.

That's my Achilles heal. Too many options and too many possibilities.

They might find me sitting in my arsenal trying to pick the top 5 weapons for deployment.

I really need to be more realistic on that stuff. I can make a case for why I'd need my 458 win mag with 200 rounds of solids.

This isnt tremors for #s sake.......


Pick a side arm, pick a rifle with enough punch to take out bigger game, but where you can more likely scavage the ammo when you inevitably run out. That and you cant let your ammo take up too much weight over other necessities......

Bout your only options bud!



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

I heard a radio report the other day that said the average 60 year-old US citizen is taking an average of seven prescription medications. The 20-somethings only take about 1.5 prescription meds. Lack of access to those drugs is going to knock out a goodly percentage of the population it would seem.

One in four US citizens is now on some mood-altering prescription as well. So they will be cold, hungry and off their meds....recipe for disaster right there.

Those who do survive will be people who have a basic knowledge of historic remedies made from natural resources.

There's not much doubt in my mind that anyone in a hospital setting when the EMP comes will die. Our local hospital was basically shut down recently when their computer system failed for a few hours. They have no paper records now so when their little pad gadgets don't work there is pandemonium. An aside to that is that the committee studying hospital-acquired infections is now trying to figure out why there was a 60% increase in those infections over the three days following that outage. Those nasty little critters like staph will get us in no time without access to antibiotics.




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