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Saturn is losing its rings quicker than expected, NASA warns

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posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 04:46 PM
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a reply to: EternalSolace

They are radio noise converted to sound.

Earth does it too.




posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars

originally posted by: gort51
What I want to know is...

What happened to the Ring around Uranus?


The story says that some other planets may have had rings like Saturn does now, maybe only a few hundred million years ago. So Uranus may have had some nice rings not too long ago.


Oh Cool,
Thank you for that info.

I can wipe that one off now.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I really want to believe in these noises because I do not find them frightening, or insignificant. They're beautiful.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars




The story says that some other planets may have had rings like Saturn does now, maybe only a few hundred million years ago. So Uranus may have had some nice rings not too long ago.


Ehh nope.



Did you mean not too long ago like one year or so or longer?
And if they were like one year ago still there and now gone wich corn mower came by and harvest that thing?
edit on 0b58America/ChicagoTue, 18 Dec 2018 16:57:58 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoTue, 18 Dec 2018 16:57:58 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 04:55 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
a reply to: Phage

So what warms the Earth and other worlds then, if not the Sun?
The sun only accounts for maybe about half of the heat radiated by Earth and Saturn.

The other half comes from various sources depending on the planet. In the case of Earth a large portion of the heat budget comes from radioactive decay, and part from primordial heat.

Radioactive decay accounts for half of Earth’s heat

“One thing we can say with near certainty is that radioactive decay alone is not enough to account for Earth’s heat energy,” says KamLAND collaborator Stuart Freedman of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in California. “Whether the rest is primordial heat or comes from another source is an unanswered question.”


Saturn also has primordial heat but helium rain causes friction as it falls, which creates heat, as long as that lasts, but like the rings, that source of heat will only have a limited life span.

Physicists find new evidence for helium ‘rain’ on Saturn

Saturn is more than 50% brighter than it ought to be for a normally cooling planet. One way to account for this is through the behavior of its massive envelope of hydrogen and helium gases. As temperatures and pressures rise in the planet’s interior, the gases become liquids. At still deeper levels, the liquid hydrogen becomes electrically conductive, or metallic, while the liquid helium remains mixed in. But once conditions surpass a certain threshold of pressures and temperatures, the liquid helium is expected to fall out of the dissolved mixture. According to theory, this liquid helium forms droplets of “rain” that fall farther towards Saturn’s core, unleashing gravitational potential energy that makes Saturn more luminous.


If you want to go to Saturn to check out the helium rain, you have more time to do that (2 billion years) than to get a closer look at the rings (only 100 million years), but they are both apparently going away in the future.



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur
Wow, never knew that. Thanks for the links



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 05:27 PM
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Not sure what theory can even be postulated as negative or positive, we have zero idea if that will benefit us or hinder us, do we?

I mean its something that has never been witnessed before so how in our small window of veiwing can we make any rational idea

Its as much use as when scientist look at why cornflakes go soggysoggy

or

Lap dancers get higher tips when they are ovulating, winner, Economics, 20082008 at least research can be fun and costly



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 05:28 PM
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Not sure what theory can even be postulated as negative or positive, we have zero idea if that will benefit us or hinder us, do we?

I mean its something that has never been witnessed before so how in our small window of veiwing can we make any rational idea

Its as much use as when scientist look at why cornflakes go soggy

or

Lap dancers get higher tips when they are ovulating, winner, Economics, 2008 at least research can be fun and costly


edit on 18-12-2018 by UpIsNowDown because: link



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 07:06 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Damned Gobal Warming, Damned Saturnian Republican's.
Blagghg.

(sorry could not resist the pun).

Seriously though just another miracle that the human race was lucky enough to exist at the right time in our solar system's history to actually witness, of course there is a theory that many of the planet's have had ring's more than once in there history and that these ring's are the result of collided moon's that broke apart or accretion disc's that have formed into moon's several time's and then broken apart again.
And of course maybe someone is already harvesting water and other resources from them? - ring shepherd's.

edit on 18-12-2018 by LABTECH767 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2018 @ 07:51 PM
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I'd blame Frodo...destroyer of rings.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 06:33 AM
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a reply to: CthulhuMythos

The current theories are that climate change is caused by MANY different things. The sun and human activity are just two of those things.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 09:10 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

“One thing we can say with near certainty is that radioactive decay alone is not enough to account for Earth’s heat energy,” says KamLAND collaborator Stuart Freedman of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in California. “Whether the rest is primordial heat or comes from another source is an unanswered question.”


We know that sunspots affect the Earth's temperature. I'm working on a theory that the sun's magnetic field provides some of the Earth's heat. Perhaps the iron depots in our planet are able to couple a certain amount of energy out of the sun's magnetic field.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

I blame solar warming.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 10:52 AM
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Saturn's Rings Are Disappearing
1:44



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars




Climate change is happening in the whole of the solar system though, as the Sun's goes through it's cycles so does the system around it.


It is not happening through the whole solar system.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: AndyFromMichigan




We know that sunspots affect the Earth's temperature.
We do? Is there an 11 year cycle in Earth's temperature?




Perhaps the iron depots in our planet are able to couple a certain amount of energy out of the sun's magnetic field.
Perhaps you'll want to ascertain the strength of the Sun's magnetic field when it reaches Earth.
edit on 12/19/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 06:10 PM
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originally posted by: scraedtosleep
a reply to: CthulhuMythos

The current theories are that climate change is caused by MANY different things. The sun and human activity are just two of those things.


I guess all the HAARP usage probably adds to any heating effect.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: CthulhuMythos

HAARP has the capability to heat portions of our own upper ionosphere.

It does not have the ability to heat the rings of Saturn or anywhere else outside our own atmosphere.

Unless Scalar waves are actually a thing, and HAARP is a great big interferometer, Tesla howitzer, type thing.
LoL

Which it is not.
edit on 19-12-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I googled 11 year cycle in Earth's temperature. There were 2 articles on the first page that I looked at, one from NASA and one from space.com. Both said yes, there is a correlation but it is not very strong. Space.com said there is some effect but the solar cycle seems to have less influence than el nino.



posted on Dec, 19 2018 @ 09:51 PM
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Click bait. NASA is "warning" about something they have no control over? Us educated people see a lot of "government alphabet agencies", "warning" about nonsense.
Let me guess? The next "big news" is? "Give us more funding". "Turn outer space into a world heritage site"...

So what about Saturn's rings? If it is even true, a big IF. NASA needs to turn this info over to the B.L.M., The U.S. Forest Service, and possibly, The A.T.F.. I love how "scientists" panic about things they have absolutely no control over.



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