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"I can't read Cursive."

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posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: Phage

I am left handed and my handwriting was terrible but early on I discovered I could draw quite well so I "drew" the letters on that green banner that ran across the wall over the blackboard.
To this day my handwriting looks very much like the letters on the banner.




posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 02:28 PM
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Even funnier is to ask a millennial for their signature.

They just scribble some lines.

Since cursive is not taught in schools, the only papers you see in elementary school with cursive writing are the asians.

They learn it on their own time



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

But the paper never offers spelling suggestions when I use a pen either. LOL.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: Bloodworth

Are you making fun me? I'm offended, lol. Seriously, my "signature" is just a scribbling that sort of looks like my name, and it's different every time is sign, so technically it is not a signature.
edit on 15-12-2018 by Theocracy4America because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: vonclod

I learned that one too haha as painstaking as it was, once learned you never forget it.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 04:37 PM
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For Internet censorship and ("netspeak"), why not spell out the expletives and forbidden words in cursive?

It seems then no young person will know what they mean.

Currently any idiot can still make out this sh*t.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 04:38 PM
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I've always felt that cursive is useless. My handwriting is truly awful, and I refuse to inflict it on an unsuspecting world.

Nor am I the only one with truly awful handwriting, some is nearly indecipherable, or actually is.

I use it for my signature, and that's it.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

Huh...that never occurred to me to do that. I just refused to do it after a certain point. My elementary school teachers didn't fuss much--since they could actually read what I had written...



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 04:45 PM
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I've found people who are more Creative, and Artisitic tend to enjoy cursive more than those who prefer print or type. It's fast becoming a lost art and that's unfortunate. As I mentioned before, those who can Write cursive, fare much better Intellectually than those who haven't got a clue how to.
edit on 15-12-2018 by ViXxeN because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 04:57 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Why can't you divide by zero? - TED-Ed
4:50



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 05:07 PM
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originally posted by: ViXxeN
I've found people who are more Creative, and Artisitic tend to enjoy cursive more than those who prefer print or type.


Bingo. Cursive is not merely a means of transmitting/recording information. It is doing it with style.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: DictionaryOfExcuses

It's all just a style. Changes with the times. Maybe in 20 or 50 years, everything will be in cursive and this will be ugly.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: Theocracy4America
a reply to: Bloodworth

Are you making fun me? I'm offended, lol. Seriously, my "signature" is just a scribbling that sort of looks like my name, and it's different every time is sign, so technically it is not a signature.


Different every time?



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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The entire reason we write like this today is because of typewriters. It was not possible to change the font so we standardized on this. Actually, near the end of the typewriter age, you could change the wheel on an IBM Selectric but almost no one ever did. Now that we no longer use these things, we are free to write and print any way we choose.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 06:55 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
In any case, I know of no case where one can say that 1+1=11 and be true. You are applying grammatical rules of English to mathematics. They are completely different languages.




(string) '1' + (int) 1 = (string) '11' in some strange programming languages.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 07:14 PM
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my 25 year old son cant read or wright it as well .
Really shocked me .
wile i can read it my writing is so bad i should have been a doctor . lol
So In order to make my writing readable i use one letter at a time version .
But really every thing signed is still in it what happens when no one can even wright tehre own name any more ?



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 07:28 PM
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a reply to: AScrubWhoDied

For putting names or numbers or other info into sentences.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: Theocracy4America
a reply to: AScrubWhoDied

For putting names or numbers or other info into sentences.



String concatenation is what you're looking for, and yes some programming languages will cast one or the other into a string type (vs doing the sensible thing of throwing an error) and instead of performing an arithmetic operation, it will perform a concat, which may not be what you're expecting.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 09:24 PM
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a reply to: toms54

That's another good video. What he's discussing at the first of it is the limit which I referred to. As the denominator approaches zero, the quotient approaches infinity.

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: AScrubWhoDied

That's a programming language designed to mimic English grammatical rules. It is not mathematics nor arithmetic.

TheRedneck




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