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"I can't read Cursive."

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posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

1+1=11




posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 11:41 PM
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originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
If we would look at education as more than something you do so you can get a job, instead of something one needs to be the best they can be, we could again be the society that brought us all of the great inventions of the Industrial Revolution. Every child needs exposure to Shakespeare. Every child needs to understand American history as a minimum, and Western Civilization history preferably. Every single child graduating high school should understand calculus. Every child should know how to read cursive writing. Those are not unreasonable goals if we concentrate more on teaching for the purpose of learning and less for the purpose of getting through with the school chore. They are only unreasonable if we keep the status quo.


I don't disagree with you about the state of education. If you're talking about real American history, I definitely agree, but that presents a bit of an issue in public schools.

But hasn't the industrial revolution led us to this sad state? Our inventions tend to isolate us at best, kill us at worst, and largely dumb us down in the process, softening us.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 01:04 AM
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They no longer teach cursive here in the schools. They've also pretty much dropped requiring kids actually learn how to do math without a calculator.

I have never wanted to facepalm so hard than I do at work when customers ask how big an 8x10 photo is. Seriously? How have you made it to adulthood and you don't know that 8x10 is the size of a standard sheet of paper?

The most amusing conversation I've heard so far was between a dad and his daughters who were sent to get curtains for the girl's rooms. None of them had a single clue how to figure out how many curtain panels they needed to cover the window. Apparently basic math skills are beyond the average person today. The future is looking pretty grim if they can't do simple addition and subtraction.

They came to get me because they needed an 'expert' in curtains. Holy mother of pearl. SMH.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 01:49 AM
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a reply to: Phage

"Properly" or "printing"? "Block writing" or printing. Is not "writing".

Cursive (writing) is an "educational" standard! Boys/Girls print or block write.
"Educated" folks, write and read in cursive.

I've come across 3 Army Lt's, 1 Marine Capt..., and 2 civilian "police officers" that can't read writing...

It's funny how one thinks the "standards" were F'ed up when they were a kid. Then you realize? At least back then, we had "standards"! Now we just have excuses. And now? Mostly from the "educated".

If you "learned", your daughter can't write "properly"? Then she can not "write" properly. Then it doesn't "matter" her "skill" in writing, or why you can't "figure it out ".

Cursive (writing) was an educational "standard" at a time. And is, or has gone, the way of the educated.

Probably why the "democratic majority" of democrats, can't read or understand the US. Constitution. It was written in an ancient "unreadable" script, called writing. I highly doubt if it was "drawn" down or printed, it would make a difference.
edit on 15-12-2018 by murphy22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 02:01 AM
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originally posted by: JacKatMtn
a reply to: TheRedneck

1+1=11





It does depending on your interpretation of the question, no different to the left and right divide playing out here in this site that used to entertain conspiracies.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 03:56 AM
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If a person cannot read or write in cursive. How are they able to have a signature? You cannot have a print signature. A person needs cursive. I have heard of some schools, not teaching cursive writing. IMO that is a mistake.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 03:59 AM
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If daughter has skills in writing. How is she doing it? On a computer, using a printer? Or writing using a note book?



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 04:12 AM
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a reply to: murphy22

This statement bears repeating!




Cursive (writing) was an educational "standard" at a time. And is, or has gone, the way of the educated.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 05:23 AM
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I don't know. Everyone I know has their own form of writing. There's not a single person I know who actually writes words out one perfectly formed letter at a time, and yet not a single one of them actually write in cursive. If anything it's an individual's in between print/cursive. I may be misunderstanding in some way, but I thought that was completely normal.

I'm not even anywhere close in age to teenagers or young adults. We were taught cursive in school, but we all knew it was bull#. No one I know uses cursive for their signatures. It's usually capital letter squiggle capital letter squiggle. Hell, I got artistic with mine. My initial form a shape, and it's completely legal. I've used it on everything from legal court documents to buying a home.

The thing with cursive it that it's simply not needed anymore. It never has been. It was just some way to impose how to write proper. If someone still wants to learn it they can. That is on them. It may help with some cognitive development, but reading, writing, learning other languages tends to do that already.
edit on 15-12-2018 by RealityIsAbsurd because: Well, my handwriting is pretty perfect, but that's neither here not there.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: RealityIsAbsurd

You don't need cursive for a signature. Even an X will do.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed


It does depending on your interpretation of the question

No. There is no interpretation. The context of the statement, 1+1=11, is the default of common numerical arithmetic. There was no alternate interpretation of the numbers specified.

See, this is the problem. 1+1=/=11. 10+1=11. Interpretation does not apply to arithmetic. Interpretation only applies to languages, of which mathematics is one that severely restricts interpretation. The second one attempts to interpret arithmetic, they fail at arithmetic.

Now, if you are asked "what is 1+1 in binary, the answer is of course 10. But that is not an interpretation... it is an answer based on the question. Without a specification on number base or some other mathematical adjustment, the default base 10 always applies. Always.

There's a very good reason for that. When someone is learning arithmetic, they need to understand the most common and practical parts first, because they are the most intuitive. If I tell a kid "you have one apple, and someone gives you another apple, how many apples do you have?" the answer is obviously 2, not 10, not 11. I can ask them to write that in math and explain the meaning of each of the symbols in 1+1=2. They get that. They are not ready for binary or hexadecimal or octal, or anything like that. They have to thoroughly understand why 1+1=2 is a true statement in order to advance to those other topics. All your interpretation would do is confuse them... and confusion is the exact opposite of learning.

In any case, I know of no case where one can say that 1+1=11 and be true. You are applying grammatical rules of English to mathematics. They are completely different languages.

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

Wait a minute, man; you haven't been in Detroit lately, have you???

1+1 = 37 in Detroit!

Hell, 0+0 = 1,251,947 in Broward County Florida!

ETA - And division by zero is perfectly acceptable in California.


edit on 12/15/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

That explains why they now make bumpers out of cheap plastic and cars where the front cap has to be removed to change a headlight...

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 08:20 AM
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originally posted by: Lumenari

originally posted by: CryHavoc
So I went to a Civil War re-enactment a couple of years ago in Channahon, Illinois. The guy dressed as Abraham Lincoln was doing a discussion and he asked a kid in the front row to read a letter that he pulled out of his jacket pocket. The kid looked at it and said:

"I can't read Cursive."

Congratulations Teachers - the next generation of children won't be able to READ any of the documents of the history of the United States. It will be a Foreign Language.


Well, the easiest way to re-write history is to ensure that people can't read the original records.

I always think of the word history as HIS Story, for instance.

Just another way to ensure that you will have people smart enough to run the machinery, but too ignorant to ask why they are chained to them.




That's disturbing. I was born in the eighties and I can't read cursive. I never thought much of it until your post. Sort of like "What if the translations of the constitution I've read have been changed" and stuff like that. It's kind of crazy too, because I can read: English, Spanish, Greek, German, and a bit of Latin; as well as a few programing languages, but not cursive. I guess I need to learn it



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 08:22 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk




ETA - And division by zero is perfectly acceptable in California.



There are a lot of imaginary concepts which are acceptable there...



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 08:31 AM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

There are examples of ideas like this in various programing languages. A line which looks like, but with the synax of the specific language, print ("x" + "y") would display xy on the screen.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: vonclod

They never thought me that.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Theocracy4America

Not really. Division by zero invokes infinity as a result,which is an abstract quantity. Mathematics does not work well with infinity. Now, we can use limits to determine that the result of division by zero is apparently infinity, but then when we use infinity as a result, what does that mean?

infinity is not handled mathematically, but intuitively. We can intuitively accept that infinity plus infinity is still infinity, or that infinity times infinity is infinity, or even that infinity plus anything is still infinity. But what about infinity times zero? Is that still zero or is it infinity? How about infinity minus infinity? Is that zero? Intuition breaks down there, and we don't know what the actual answer is.

Division by zero is not an acceptable operation, except in the few cases where it can be handled intuitively. It is a discontinuity in the resulting function.

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 08:51 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

It's so odd that some the leeding scientific theories contain situations where things are divided by zero, or vice versa.



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

No ... 1+1 = 37 in Detroit *only* if they show the process by which they arrived at 37 for their answer and then they get points for the process. By contrast, if they simply write 1+1 = 2, which we all know is the right answer, then they get it wrong because they did not show the process by which they arrived at the correct answer. The answer does not figure in to how points are assigned in Common Core.

The sad thing is that they are making it that way in my son's 2nd grade class which means he has to draw a lot which is very hard for him with dysgraphia. He understands math pretty intuitively, but cannot simply write the answer or he gets it wrong even when he has it right.
edit on 15-12-2018 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)







 
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