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Interesting find about what chickens prefer to eat - not what I expected

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posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 02:17 PM
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My chickens love sausages the best, or burgers. Then it's probably spaghetti, their favourite type of pasta, must be the shape, reminds them of worms.

And I had one chicken who was just desperate for custard cream biscuits. Those were just her favourite thing in the entire world. If you said 'biscuit!' she'd come charging over to you.


But yeah, they do like human food. High calorie content. They're not stupid.




posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 02:22 PM
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Chickens given the chance will take meat over anything else. Give it a try.

They will also kill and eat each other and often do if there is a weak or injured chicken in their group.

These offspring of the dinosaurs can eat most anything at all.



posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 03:00 PM
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could it be GMO corn. is why they turned their nose up at it?

If their staple is corn, can see anything other than corn being more desirable, if edible...

to lay eggs, need calcium/oyster shells in the hen feed mix formula for laying eggs.....

Presume majority of animal feed is GMO based now and would not be surprised if you put organic non gmo corn out with the gmo corn, if they ate the organic and left the gmo corn.

well, had to put the above theory in check...




Experimental and anecdotal evidence shows that animals seek to avoid GM food and do not thrive if forced to consume such food. Dr Eva Novotny reports.

Nevertheless, it may be significant that the mortality rate was twice as high among the chickens eating the GM maize as compared with those fed commercial non-GM hybrid maize.

Scientific evidence for animal preferences

Although it may be difficult to credit animals with the ability to distinguish between GM and non-GM feed, this anecdotal evidence is supported by scientific evidence that they can indeed distinguish between organically- and non-organically-produced feed; moreover, they have a definite preference for the former (see “Do animals like good food?” this issue).

www.i-sis.org.uk...



posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: Wildbob77
Also, chickens only lay really good for a couple or maybe three years, then you need some young ones if you like your eggs.

Might be a good idea to get a rooster, too.



posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: network dude

originally posted by: SeaWorthy
a reply to: lordcomac




Tell you what though- chickens are stupid

I disagree.


I do not. below freezing, I put a heat lamp in the coop, and they still sleep outside. they are dumb.


Maybe they know something you don't.



posted on Dec, 14 2018 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Maybe unlike humans they knew the corn was GMO ? hahah



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 09:44 AM
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When I had chickens, they would eat anything pretty much. They would eat the laying mash and chicken scratch mixes from the local farmer's co-op. Table scraps of all kinds was never refused. During deer hunting season, I'd mix in some shelled field corn from the deer bait and they ate that up. Bugs, worms, frogs, salamanders, small snakes, and whatever moved when they free ranged was probably their favorite food source and occupied most of their day time activities.

I tend to agree that perhaps these chickens had their fill of corn and needed some variety in their diet. I could see them passing up corn if there was something they liked better in abundance. As far as being able to identify GMO corn vs Non-GMO corn, it may taste different or feel different in their guts, but I doubt they cold smell the difference. Chickens are pretty stupid, but have remarkable instincts, worthy of close study.

Chicken Scratch Article



posted on Dec, 15 2018 @ 10:58 AM
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My dad says that a Rooster gives a certain call to warn all other chickens if a hawk passes over. I've searched videos but haven't been able to find the call they make.

How does a Rooster know if a predator bird is flying over?
edit on 15-12-2018 by Trucker1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 12:33 PM
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My Chickens favorite foods:

-bugs. First and foremost. we have a "chicken tractor" that we put them out in the summer days. Move it every morning. We supply food, but they basically quit eating commercial food and it becomes all bugs all the time. Chickens are technically insectivores rather than gramnovores; we feed them grain because it is convenient for Americans, not because it is best for birds.

-cooked oatmeal. If the low is below 20 degrees, I feed them warm (leftover) oatmeal for breakfast. On holidays (thanksgiving, christmas) the kids insist that we give them sprinkles on top. They seem to like it that way.

-cracked corn. Nutritionally, it is merely candy for them. but I give them some every day.

-pizza crust. Not allowed to give them chicken pizza leftovers, since the young people at my place say that's cannibalism, and against house rules. whatever.

-stale pancakes. We feed the tiny humans pancakes on non-school days. when left out on the counter, the pancakes get hard fast. the chickens like em stale, but not fresh.

-fully seeded-out sunflower heads.

-ornamental corn from the thanksgiving display on the front porch

-leftover pumpkins from the church pumpkin patch. (goats like em too)

-whatever nightcrawlers I didn't use when fishing.

-mice. We have field mice on the roof. If it (ever) rains, the chickens gather round the downspout on the barn and fight over field mice washed out of the gutters. The rooster usually wins.

-bees. The chickens range where the bees do, in my bee-pasture in the spring. The bees are north Italians, so less-aggressive. But if they land near a chicken, they get eaten instantly. The bees know this, and so it seldom happens now, except when the dandelions bloom....

-milk. I don't usually give them milk, but I had some I couldn't use for cheese making, and gave it to them instead of the goats, as an experiment. The chickens loved it. I hesitate to leave some out for fear it will draw mice if the hens don't finish it.

-spoiled veggies from the fridge or improperly harvested from the garden. All non-safened seeds that didn't get planted in the spring.



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 12:38 PM
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originally posted by: Trucker1
My dad says that a Rooster gives a certain call to warn all other chickens if a hawk passes over. I've searched videos but haven't been able to find the call they make.

How does a Rooster know if a predator bird is flying over?


The shadow is what they react to. They freak out if the shadow of an airplane passes them. Raptors hunt on thermals, which means toward midday, when the sun is overhead, and puts the shadow below the raptor...

I cannot describe the noise. It is unusual, and makes me come look. The rooster will herd all the hens under areal cover, and then shield them with his body and outspread wings. he will sacrifice himself for the girls. And put up a hell of a fight, when he obviously must lose.



posted on Dec, 20 2018 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

I had a hen for a pet once and her diet was mostly commercial chicken feed but she was free range though that term wasnt invented yet and she ate bugs all day long. She especially liked those little pill bugs, the ones that roll into a little ball. and she liked fruit likes raisins and dried cranberries and cherries.



posted on Dec, 22 2018 @ 11:06 AM
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if you want to hear the distress sound that chickens make, let them see a cat....that should do it...especially if they have baby chicks to protect.



posted on Dec, 25 2018 @ 11:16 AM
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originally posted by: dojozen

if you want to hear the distress sound that chickens make, let them see a cat....that should do it...especially if they have baby chicks to protect.


Actually, most prey animals have separate alarm signals for flying versus creeping predators. So the group members know whether to hide or flee. Raptors are vulnerable on the ground, and won't attack as readily as when pouncing from above to break the victims neck/back



posted on Dec, 25 2018 @ 03:56 PM
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a reply to: Graysen

yea, that sounds right, had a snake in my hen house a few nights ago and hens and roosters did not make lot of noise...

Have lot of hawks here, several varieties, and have raised free ranging chickens for years, with baby chicks as well, and have lost a few chicks over the years, not very many, as I normally go out and chase of the hawks when around, though the hens are real good about getting their chicks under cover from hawks and they go hide under brush and shrubs when hawks or other aerial predators are around...

Cats get then hens and rooster going...same for armadillo




posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 12:57 AM
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a reply to: dojozen

Where I live, raptors are a major problem; anytime you look in the daytime sky, you'll see at least one in the sky somewhere.

I have one neighbor who says that hawks and eagles are afraid for their wings, that the wing bones are hollow and delicate. He didn't spend the money to roof or chicken-wire the roof of his chicken run. Instead, he came out with a spool of 550/paracord, and just tied zigzags between bushes, fenceposts and anything else above 6 feet. I will say he has not had an areal attack anytime since; and his "barrage netting" doesn't hold rainwater or snow, so there isn't a lot of weight on it.

Thought for food.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: dojozen


if you want to hear the distress sound that chickens make, let them see a cat....that should do it...especially if they have baby chicks to protect.

Cats will kill chickens (we think it was a stray cat that got one turkey hen), but they do not want to mess with a gobbler!

We have a couple of stray cats we haven't been able to kill yet, and one tried yesterday for one of the birds. Tom spotted it and went straight into attack mode. He had that cat backed up against a tree trunk screaming bloody murder! As soon as the cat managed to get clear of the claws and beak, it headed away at a very rapid rate of speed.


TheRedneck



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:05 AM
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Our hens have killed and eaten mice and also frogs. They go mad for snails and grab them from each other's beaks and run off with them. They are very attracted to the colour red.

They will eat pretty much everything but we avoid giving them meat - especially chicken! - or spicy food. Crab/fish sticks are a favourite as are instant noodles (when cooled, of course). Our cats are very wary of them - have seen them get a peck on the nose when they have got too close.

We let them out into the garden occasionally during the winter when they can't do too much damage because apparently they can sniff out and eat snail eggs. Surprising, but apparently true.

Like little dinosaurs, really.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:17 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck




We have a couple of stray cats we haven't been able to kill yet,


You kill stray cats?




posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:22 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Don't eat corn.... it is gmo..... chickens know it is poison.



posted on Jan, 2 2019 @ 06:23 AM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

You kill cats...... not a good thing to tell people!



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