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Will she, wont she survive vote of no confidence?

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posted on Dec, 12 2018 @ 05:38 PM
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originally posted by: ipsedixit


Satire:





Its NOT funny ....... I believe she has been promising Honours and Titles like

throwing around confetti for votes her way.







edit on 12-12-2018 by eletheia because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 12 2018 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: eletheia

Read the 26 page political declaration today -

We're leaving the Union BUT we're going with mostly close co-operation of the two parties on most matters .

Points of note - when a country deals with Europe they're dealing with a Union which controls everything about internal governance . We're getting control of our own policy back , but in a sensible-ish sounding way

- the declaration is oddly void of mention towards the CAP . Had to find out elsewhere that CAP direct payments may continue until 2028



posted on Dec, 12 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: eletheia

There is always horse trading in politics, but I don't think those issues, in this situation with the nation's future at stake, would loom as large as Mr. Rees-Mogg claims. The Conservative government is headed for a no confidence vote anyway and if Mr. Rees-Mogg believes that wrenching the wheel out of Mrs. May's hands at this point would make a difference then he should have campaigned harder among his fellow Tories and told them all they could keep their jobs and have knighthoods too, if they voted against May. He didn't do it, or if he did, not enough people bought it, quite rightly, I believe.



posted on Dec, 12 2018 @ 06:52 PM
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All scripted.

No-one wants the poisoned chalice at present.
No-one else wants to be tainted with Brexit - or no Brexit or whatever....it'd be political suicide for someone to take the Prime Minister's job under current circumstances.

She see's Brexit through - her 'deal' isn't Brexit in my opinion but what's my opinion worth really? - then she goes.

She's been told she'll be replaced....but I'm sure she'll be looked after very nicely.

They'll all be fine and dandy, the status quo will remain the same....we'll keep on getting shafted!

Predictable.....and a complete sell out.



posted on Dec, 12 2018 @ 07:09 PM
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a reply to: Freeborn

A deal has been negotiated. The EU has said that they will not revisit the terms of the deal. They have said that they might be able to pretty it up to help May get it passed but that the substantive issues are dealt with and fixed.

They have the UK in a very tough predicament of the UK's making. They could say to them, "Take the deal on offer or reject it, but you are out of the EU on March 29 unless you decide to withdraw the invocation of Article 50."

They will probably give them an extension of chaos instead.

A no deal Brexit, as any number of important people, ex PMs, the PM of Japan and any number of industrial concerns have told the government, would be very serious trouble for the UK economy.

Ten years, is what I figure it would take to put Britain back on its feet, and it would be a different Britain.

Rees-Mogg has already moved part of his financial enterprise to Ireland. The financiers can handle Brexit, but the rest of the economy is going to suffer without a deal. The UK's best move is to withdraw Article 50, stay in the EU and work from within to achieve a situation that most Brits can live with.
edit on 12-12-2018 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 03:30 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn

I agree. She didn't make the decision not to stand at the next election....she was told by the 'backroom boys' who run the party.....reminiscent of "Yes, Prime Minister"

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 03:34 AM
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originally posted by: ipsedixit
a reply to: Freeborn

The UK's best move is to withdraw Article 50, stay in the EU and work from within to achieve a situation that most Brits can live with.


....THAT is exactly what a remainer wants......but if it happens it will be done risking the ire of the majority who voted to leave and having Gilet Jaune on our streets.
If the Remainers so want this to happen, why aren't they out on the streets? Because they know damn well they are in the minority.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 04:10 AM
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originally posted by: ipsedixit
a reply to: Freeborn

A deal has been negotiated. The EU has said that they will not revisit the terms of the deal. They have said that they might be able to pretty it up to help May get it passed but that the substantive issues are dealt with and fixed.



Not negotiated ..... terms dictated which tie the UK in FOREVER.

NOT WHAT WAS VOTED FOR




They have the UK in a very tough predicament of the UK's making. They could say to them, "Take the deal on offer or reject it, but you are out of the EU on March 29 unless you decide to withdraw the invocation of Article 50."


Take that

Thats a better offer than their 'deal' anything is better than what they are offering.

What experience does she have in negotiation? she should have got professionals

in with business experience. instead of her cap in hand "please sir" attitude.




A no deal Brexit, as any number of important people, ex PMs, the PM of Japan and any number of industrial concerns have told the government, would be very serious trouble for the UK economy.


There are more than that and of equally high profile and importance who believe

the UK will prosper when they leave, and that the UK is being held back by the

EU mafia.




Ten years, is what I figure it would take to put Britain back on its feet, and it would be a different Britain.


You have qualifactions to support that statement?



Rees-Mogg has already moved part of his financial enterprise to Ireland. The financiers can handle Brexit, but the rest of the economy is going to suffer without a deal.


As I heard it he has expanded his business NOT moved it.

He certainly has more qualifactions in business and negotiating than TM why

did she not make use of them.

Is it because she is the EU fall guy?



edit on 13-12-2018 by eletheia because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 04:32 AM
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originally posted by: angelchemuel

originally posted by: ipsedixit
a reply to: Freeborn

The UK's best move is to withdraw Article 50, stay in the EU and work from within to achieve a situation that most Brits can live with.


....THAT is exactly what a remainer wants......but if it happens it will be done risking the ire of the majority who voted to leave and having Gilet Jaune on our streets.
If the Remainers so want this to happen, why aren't they out on the streets? Because they know damn well they are in the minority.


No, 50 million in this country didn't vote for Brexit. That is a majority, even if many are apathetic. The Referendum happened, Brexit won (just) but more people want to stay now. As such, the only sensible withdrawal is one that keeps us independent from but in line with the EU.

I fully accept that Brexit has to happen. But hard Brexiteers have to accept that they are in a serious minority - by the numbers game, there is very little support for a hard Brexit. As such, a deal has to happen.

As to May surviving, not suprised in the slightest. 67% of Tory members think calling the no confidence vote was wrong and shouldn't have happened. As to her replacement, Sajid Javid is the overwhelming favourite amongst members - with Boris way down the list and Rees-Mogg barely featuring.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 04:51 AM
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originally posted by: Flavian
No, 50 million in this country didn't vote for Brexit. That is a majority, even if many are apathetic. The Referendum happened, Brexit won (just) but more people want to stay now. As such, the only sensible withdrawal is one that keeps us independent from but in line with the EU.


Supposition .......

I dont know of one person who voted to leave who has changed their minds

but I do know a few remainers who because of the EU's attitude would vote

leave if there was another vote!!

And if you are relying on polls that remain would win in a further vote.....

When was the last poll correct in its prediction, polls are notoriously wrong.

Scottish referendum, last few English elections, 'the' EU referendum........




I fully accept that Brexit has to happen. But hard Brexiteers have to accept that they are in a serious minority - by the numbers game, there is very little support for a hard Brexit. As such, a deal has to happen.


I wouldn't be too sure about that either......For someone who wants to leave it

is not good enough to be shackled to the EU in any form.



edit on 13-12-2018 by eletheia because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 05:44 AM
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a reply to: Flavian



I fully accept that Brexit has to happen.





But hard Brexiteers have to accept that they are in a serious minority.....


Are we?

You have more faith in opinion polls than I, they've hardly been accurate recently have they?



- by the numbers game, there is very little support for a hard Brexit.


According to these unreliable polls?
Or personal opinion?

I understand that in many circles a hard Brexit will probably have limited support....but speaking personally I know far more people who would prefer No Deal at present than all other viewpoints together.



As such, a deal has to happen.


Of course that's the preferred option for people....the offer on the table at present is the worst of both world's.



No, 50 million in this country didn't vote for Brexit. That is a majority, even if many are apathetic.


The same argument can be used for every election.....the FACT is that they majority of people who could be bothered to vote wanted to LEAVE....democracy at work.



The Referendum happened, Brexit won (just) but more people want to stay now.


How do we know that?



As such, the only sensible withdrawal is one that keeps us independent from but in line with the EU.


Could you please elaborate?
Are you saying we must still accept their rules and laws?

That's not independence.



As to May surviving, not suprised in the slightest. 67% of Tory members think calling the no confidence vote was wrong and shouldn't have happened.


No-one else wants the job at the moment.....and why would they?



As to her replacement, Sajid Javid is the overwhelming favourite amongst members - with Boris way down the list and Rees-Mogg barely featuring.


Bookies are rarely wrong on such things, far more reliable than opinion polls.

One things for certain, no matter who's at the helm looking after the likes of you and I won't be their primary concern.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 05:48 AM
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apparently she will.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 07:10 AM
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originally posted by: angelchemuel

originally posted by: ipsedixit
a reply to: Freeborn

The UK's best move is to withdraw Article 50, stay in the EU and work from within to achieve a situation that most Brits can live with.


....THAT is exactly what a remainer wants......but if it happens it will be done risking the ire of the majority who voted to leave and having Gilet Jaune on our streets.
If the Remainers so want this to happen, why aren't they out on the streets? Because they know damn well they are in the minority.[/quote

They are on the streets, there's Remainers to be heard on every newscast from outside Parliament shouting "stop Brexit!".



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: djz3ro
...there are leavers shouting them down on the same live newscasts.
The nation is split and if we don't leave the EU then I'll be catching a train to London.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 10:19 AM
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Anyone who really hates the British and would love to see them shafted, even destroyed as a "united" kingdom, will jump on the Brexit bandwagon with gusto and encourage the Brexiters. That's why there was Russian money and internet trolling in the Brexit campaign.

I can understand the sentiment of genuine Brexiters who don't like the shape of life in the EU. I get it. I'm sympathetic. Membership in the EU is going to change British society without a doubt, but so is withdrawal from the EU. The economic consequences of withdrawal are going to be catastrophic. Brexiters will understand this point better, post Brexit, when the companies that have said they will move their plants to places within the EU begin to do so.
edit on 13-12-2018 by ipsedixit because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: ipsedixit
Again, more doom porn opinion delivered as fact.
You don't know that, you don't know which business leaders are bluffing, all opinion, and there are plenty of business leaders saying the opposite.
Stop doing the remoaners tactic of spreading doom porn as fact...it's lame.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Brexiters really have to get out of the pub more often.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 01:39 PM
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originally posted by: ipsedixit
a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Brexiters really have to get out of the pub more often.

That's a rather cheap and lame insult.
I come to ATS for debate, not childlike comments.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy
a reply to: djz3ro
...there are leavers shouting them down on the same live newscasts.
The nation is split and if we don't leave the EU then I'll be catching a train to London.


The only way I could afford to protest in London is if Soros pays for me to get there. Well, I could book a Megabus if I have a month's notice of any protes. Certainly couldn't afford the train. I'll be joining one of the national protests, probably Dundee or Glasgow. As much as I voted Remain, the democratic will of the people should be upheld.



posted on Dec, 13 2018 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: 727Sky
In 1945 After Churchill basically saved Briton he was voted out of power. It was a few years later after the government nationalized many of the businesses and the economy tanked he was voted back in power to correct the situation which he did.



Nope.

Churchill ran the war but the country was run by a cross party coalition. The voters, including the military, did not want to have won the war for nothing. Churchill offered nothing new, Attlee promised a New Jerusalem so they voted for Atlee.

Attlee lost the third time around for many reasons but had delivered an average of 3% economic growth. The only real economic crunch came when the US abruptly ended lend-lease without warning the UK government. Attlee also reformed education, welfare and healthcare, mainly along the lines of ideas proposed when Churchill was PM.

Churchill's 1951 government was fairly average. He realised the mood of the country and did little to undo Attlee's reforms. IIRC, the only nationalised industry he privatised was steel production. He continued to invest and develop in the NHS, campaigned on building more council houses and tiptoed around the unions, preferring to settle than confront eg giving in completely to the rail unions in 1955 (again, IIRC).

In short, there was nothing remarkable about his second term as PM. He delivered slightly better economic growth (3.8% pa I think) and he carried on most of Attlee's policies.

Check out Peter Hennessy's "Never Again" and the first two books in David Kynaston's Tales of a New Jerusalem if you want in depth but very accessible histories of post war Britain.




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