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To RV or Not To RV...

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posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:30 AM
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It's recently been strongly suggest I buy an RV.
Never...EVER did I think I'd be 'that guy'.

With family scattered and my son taking a new job out of state...Wife suggested it may be something worth looking into.

Naturally, she suggests it must be pretty, expensive, and new one...with all the trimmings.
Aside from the logic of visiting distant relatives and seeing the country...this 'mortgage on wheels' has always seemed like a waste of money.


Anyone have one of these and actually use it?
All thoughts from owners would be greatly appreciated.




posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:37 AM
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I came here thinking to remote view or not to remote view ..

Just shows my mindset currently



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:42 AM
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I worked in the RV industry for about 10 years.
The only thing I've ever found to be a bigger waste of money is the boating industry.

Honestly with the cost of campgrounds per night coupled with the fuel and vehicle payments you might as well stay in hotels.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:44 AM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
I worked in the RV industry for about 10 years.
The only thing I've ever found to be a bigger waste of money is the boating industry.

Honestly with the cost of campgrounds per night coupled with the fuel and vehicle payments you might as well stay in hotels.


That's been my thinking as well.
Being in the industry...which brand would you suggest (Class C vehicle)?
edit on 11-12-2018 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)

edit on 11-12-2018 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Parking, backing up, traffic, cleaning the toilet septic. I've rented RV's and they can be a nightmare.


Stay at 5-star hotels.

Get catered and spoiled.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: theruthlessone

Honestly, I have had and heard nothing but issues with RVs. Like you said it is a mortgage on wheels. It drastically depreciates, and is just another engine to have things go wrong with.

Now, I have never owed a brand new one. However, the ones I have owned were in pretty good condition.

Talking to a lot of people when we travel, it seems like a lot people settle for the expensive vehicle and the less expensive, but still nice, fifth wheel trailer. Still going to have things go wrong, but they are more normal occurrences and because of that are less expensive to fix.

ETA: Whatever you decide, enjoy the open road.

edit on 11-12-2018 by headorheart because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

I've been out of that industry for 20 years so I have no idea what to recommend.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:48 AM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: IAMTAT

Parking, backing up, traffic, cleaning the toilet septic. I've rented RV's and they can be a nightmare.


Stay at 5-star hotels.

Get catered and spoiled.



Agreed.
A vacation without room service is not a vacation.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:49 AM
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I would say that it would be cool to have one for one long road trip and then try to get rid of it. I view it like gambling, don't do it unless you are sure you can afford to lose money. I have no recommendations on a model. I haven't hit a point where I can have that much leisure time.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:53 AM
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originally posted by: Fools
I would say that it would be cool to have one for one long road trip and then try to get rid of it. I view it like gambling, don't do it unless you are sure you can afford to lose money. I have no recommendations on a model. I haven't hit a point where I can have that much leisure time.


I'm not retired...but my work allows me to work anywhere.
I'd only use it to visit...and it looks like these things really depreciate in value quickly.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:54 AM
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They're nowhere near as cheap as they used to be. My dad used to run a rental business for RV vacation rentals, and the cost now compared to back then (and adjusted for inflation) absolutely floors him. I mentioned we were considering taking a week to rent an RV & drive around MI next year, and he told me to find a hotel somewhere and avoid the RVing, that the cost of the RV rental alone is more than a week's hotel stay at a resort is.
I checked a few resorts out around the northern end of the MI lower peninsula, and damned if he wasn't right -- I can get a week's resort stay for about $1200-$1500 for the 4 of us during the off-season, even less at hotels & cabins.
Factor in the insurance for it, and the gas (RV's aren't the best on fuel efficiency) and a car & a rental room is a much better bang for the buck.

Now, if you're going to buy one, look at rental businesses and see if they have any up for sale. He said he used to sell his every few years & buy new ones to keep the models new & appealing, and said it's still a common practice. I've found plenty of basic Coachmen types around me for under $20k (some as little as $10k, if a small interior doesn't bother you) So if you own one, it's obviously going to be a MUCH better deal than renting is.

We're holding off on the RV idea, be it renting or buying, for now. We'll probably rent a cabin next year and blow the kids' little minds that way instead.
In other words, never rent, and buy used.
edit on 12/11/2018 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: Nyiah


Good advice. TY.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:57 AM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT

originally posted by: Fools
I would say that it would be cool to have one for one long road trip and then try to get rid of it. I view it like gambling, don't do it unless you are sure you can afford to lose money. I have no recommendations on a model. I haven't hit a point where I can have that much leisure time.


I'm not retired...but my work allows me to work anywhere.
I'd only use it to visit...and it looks like these things really depreciate in value quickly.



It would seem that you have already been "talked" into it. :-) Good luck!



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

We usually get an Airbnb these days. Cheaper than a hotel, you've got your own house to stay in, and you don't have to empty the pooper.

They say BOAT stands for Bust Out Another Thousand. I think RV's are similar to that.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: FauxMulder


I'm basically having my own concerns and objections validated.
THIS is a GOOD thing.

PLUS those toilets scare me.
Driving around with an outhouse in your back seat...just sounds wrong.
edit on 11-12-2018 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 10:50 AM
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The people I have known, enjoyed RV-ing for a couple years, and then were desperate and happy to bail out and try to start over. That is, a permanent location house.

Depreciation is paramount when selling.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 10:51 AM
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The RV world is certainly not for everyone. I've been RV'ing since 2010 and always had 5th wheels. Course you need a good dependable strong truck. I currently have a 38' and a monster diesel Ford to tow it. I spent one entire summer with my son and we hit all the national parks in Utah, Grand Canyon, NV, Southern Cali, then on up to Oregon. I spent 2 1/2 yrs living in one of which about a yr was traveling around the Pacific NW and the SouthWest states.

My latest 5th wheel is classified as residential luxury and in my case it's tax deductible just like a house.

Tons of fun but huge learning curve, Yuuge, can be quite costly and nightmarish for some whom make stupid forgetful mistakes. At times a love/hate relationship, like a marriage. I was always prepared, did countless months of research, and I'm somewhat of an expert on maintenance, towing and backing it up in tight spaces. You tend to learn quick or pay $$$.

I never had a issue with black tanks or grey tanks or a literal sh#t mess because the sewer hose burst like I've seen happen to so many.

If I were just starting out today and totally unsure if this camp or lifestyle is for me I'd find a RV dealership that rents them. The small Class C's are most popular but with any mini or Class A you need a toad - tow car otherwise you're anchored to a large vehicle just to buy milk, ice, beer or whatever.

There's 10,000 questions and you will NEVER get them all answered until you're actually on the road with one. I spent a year researching the RV world, mostly in RV forums and talking F2F with people who owned and used them frequently. Then decided it was time to pull the trigger.

When traveling around I'd stay at a RV park or a campground if I can fit. Yes, nowadays this can be costly but I much prefer over hotel or tent. After traveling around I'd find a decent RV park to stay long term and then only have to pay $500-$650 per month. Yea, I was a snowbird for short while.

If you only plan on being a weekend warrior, the occasional summer weekends than probably not worth buying unless you have tons of $$$ to burn.

Feel free to ask me anything as I know alot on the subject.







43' roadtrain toyhauler (18,500 lbs loaded)



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: EndtheMadnessNow


TY.
Some great information there.

I'm only even considering a 'C Class' vehicle.
There is a yearly RV convention coming to our city in early Jan. 2019...so this should be educational.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Toilets are the least of your worries really. The bigger issues are workmanship, leaks and rodents.

One other important thing to know...RV financing works differently from any other financing you've ever done (Think: loan shark). RV companies aren't making money on the RV's...they're making money on the financing! Here's the big difference with most...

If you buy a car, you have the cost of the car and the cost of the financing, right? However, if you decide to pay your car off (say to sell it for example), you have the payoff amount which is the principle only. On most RV loans it works differently. If you decide to pay off an RV, you usually have to pay off the entire principle, plus ALL the interest for the entire life of the note. This can be huge...and it can make it impossible to sell a used RV without taking a massive financial bath. So, let's look at an example of what this means...

Say your purchase price is $100,000 (just hypothetical numbers here) and, in order to get the payments where you need them, you take a 10 year note. The full loan amount is probably something like $300,000 (but the RV itself is only worth $100k). So after a couple years you decide your hate RV'ing and want to sell your RV. The value of your RV is now probably 50% (if that) of it's original value when new, say $50k. BUT YOU OWE $250,000 on it! (2.5x what it was worth when new). And, you can't get out of it.

Now go take a look on craigslist for used RV's for sale, and look at the crazy prices people are asking for them. You'll see 6-7 year old RV's selling for 80%, even up to 90%, of the new price. And the really sad part is, even at those prices the owner is probably still taking it in the shorts for 2x that much!

Moral of the story - Ask a lot of specific questions about paying the vehicle off early, and don't settle for any BS or evasive answers like "Oh, you know, it's just the usual process, or, "Oh, that's all the technical mumbo-jumbo, and I'm not an attorney" Trust me, they KNOW...and they don't want to tell you! And read ALL the fine print...every word. If you don't understand something, ask. If they won't answer, show it to an attorney and ask them.

Now, you might find a lending institution which doesn't have these 'loan shark' terms, but most traditional banks and credit unions won't touch an RV, unless it's on a very short term note (like 36 months or less) which means STIFF monthly payments.

Oh, and one more thing. People talk about gas, and campground fees, and RV payments. But probably one of the biggest costs people overlook is...storage. A decent sized RV is going to cost anywhere from $100-250/month to store, and you can add that right onto your monthly payments (unless you've got somewhere to store it, which most don't).

And even one more thing! If you're going to buy used, your first question to the seller should be to show you the clear title (i.e. NO lien holder!). There are so many scammers out there who will try to get you to give them money on the promise that they will "get" the title (and when you consider the numbers above, you can see how that might not be so easy). Then you're faced with trying to get your money back when they realize they can't get the title that easy (and you hope errr "pray" they haven't done stupid like spend the money on some other kind of a loan, which will take years to unscramble in court).

Bottom line, I too am looking into buying an RV, and the above are just a few of the things I've learned in my research so far. I owned them decades ago, but that was all long before all this nonsense. I will likely buy used, and I will pay cash, but not before I see a clean title.

Buyer Beware!

Hope this helps.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
It's recently been strongly suggest I buy an RV.
Never...EVER did I think I'd be 'that guy'.

With family scattered and my son taking a new job out of state...Wife suggested it may be something worth looking into.

Naturally, she suggests it must be pretty, expensive, and new one...with all the trimmings.
Aside from the logic of visiting distant relatives and seeing the country...this 'mortgage on wheels' has always seemed like a waste of money.


Anyone have one of these and actually use it?
All thoughts from owners would be greatly appreciated.



If I had my druthers and no kids, I'd sell everything right now and get an Airstream. I want to roam the US from the tip of Maine to California full time. I'd go check out somewhere for like a week or two and then try somewhere else new. I'd bring my motorcycle to explore all the roads, local sights, parks, restaurants, and other attractions.

I follow a few youtube vloggers who are RVing full time. I don't think an RV purchase, much like boats, makes sense though unless you are really committed to putting some serious miles on it at least several months a year.

You can do it much more cheaply than traveling staying in hotels. A few of the vloggers have posted their yearly full time expenses to be about $20-$30k a year.




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