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Who will be next UK Prime Minister, when and how?

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posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 07:43 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy




Would you take a Corbyn/Sturgeon coalition if that became a possibility?


The SNP basically offered up as much to Labour the other day in parliament and I wouldn't be surprised if they are in talks just now about doing some kind of deal. The problem with that for the UK is I think he SNP might demand a second Scottish referendum on independence in exchange for backing Labour. If it where me I would be picking my battles and if I was Ian Blackford (SNP leader in Westminster) I would be spinning it to say that all the want to do is keep Scotland in the EU as the people of Scotland voted and not bother with indyref2 right now.

What could happen, and its a crazy thought, but its happened before is that Labour forms a government of national unity with other minority parties with the stated goal of fixing the Brexit mess. That though I highly doubt as all minority parties have different views and priorities when it comes to Brexit and I doubt they would be able to secure a majority that could all agree on one unified version of Brexit.




posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

They are all a shower of #e mate.

First of all let me say, yet again, that Brexit and the current piss poor state of British politics and the pure scum that infest Parliament all go to show just how out-of-date and unfit for purpose our current system and processes are.

Party politics will ruin this country - we need reform now!

To the matter at hand;
We'll have a change of Prime Minister before Brexit occurs on March 29th 2019.

I can only pray and hope its neither Rees-Mogg or Boris.....two of the best examples of everything that is wrong with UK politics.
Exactly the same can be said about Corbyn - how anyone thinks he can be entrusted with the safety and security of this country is beyond me.

It should be made mandatory that all MP's should have at least five years experience in a 'real' job before they qualify to serve.

I hate admitting it but I am a life-long Labour voter.
Not because I hold any sense of loyalty but purely because their domestic and social policies have tended to be more in line with mine than any other parties and the local candidates have seemed a better fit for my town than others.

For various reasons I suspect that may change in the future.

There are one or two young(ish) Labour MP's who I have hopes for but I think the Premiership is too early for them at present.

The two people I wouldn't mind seeing replace May might surprise people;
Sajid Javid - seems pretty down to earth, shrewd and astute.
Whilst I may not agree with many of his opinions he is I think a politician of conviction, relatively speaking of course.

Ruth Davidson.
Not a current MP but leader of the Scottish Conservatives and a powerful individual who is prepared to stand up for what she believes in and someone who appears to genuinely want to do what is right for the people she represents.
Again, I don't agree with her on many things, but she's head and shoulders above most of the vermin in Westminster.

There's one or two others, some not even politicians, but it isn't going to happen.

I think that twat Rees-Mogg will be forced upon us.....out of the fire sort of springs to mind.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 07:57 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin
That's a crazy thought!
I wouldn't be surprised if the next govt was some coalition like that.
It's like a rock and a hard place for me thinking about who I vote for next.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn

I agree with you on your two choices I think Ruth Davidson would be good but she has said that she wouldn't do the job for the sake of her mental health or family

The whole thing is a utter mess. I honestly don't see we have got many options left.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn
Sajid Javid is an interesting suggestion. Is he a leave or remainer? I don't know much about him to be fair.
As you say though they're all a bit of a lame choice, I swear I don't know who I'll vote for when I next get the chance.
Labour is a wasted vote here, so the only ones with a chance of being MP are Tory, or Lib-Dem.
Crazy times ahead, but yep, Rees-Mogg is a bit of a twat, stuck up prick.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy



BJ looks like the likely choice if the Cons can cling to power. Not a fan, to say the least.


Well, at least there's two of us who see through his posturing.

I think they'll force Mogodon Man on us.



Corbyn is resisting launching a no confidence vote because Labour's position on Brexit is fudged and would soon unravel.


And he's a twat....and he did you know what with you know who!



Sad that there is no effective Opposition to this lot.


The very fact that this government is still in power is testament to just how ineffective and unfit for power the Opposition are....another damning indictment on UK politics.



Starmer is simply out of his depth.


He's hardly alone though is he?



The whole thing is a shambles.


This my friend may actually qualify for understatement of the year.




We are being pushed around by the French, the Germans, the Dutch, Spanish and even Malta. What would Hornblower make of it all?


I found myself shouting at the TV when Varadkar was on it last night.....to think that these countries and their leaders think they have the right to order this country about and tell us on what terms we are allowed to leave their crappy club....No Deal!



May's incompetence makes me cringe.


I've gone beyond anger and cringing and disbelief and now drift off into numbness whenever I see her.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:22 AM
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originally posted by: CornishCeltGuy
a reply to: alldaylong

I wasn't born until the 70's and I've read a little bit about it but have no idea of the politics of the time.
Can you give me it in a nutshell please


It's a bit long winded but here it is in a nutshell. Anthony Eden was Prime Minister at the time. It ended up with him resigning through miss leading Parliament.




Eden, a master of self-delusion, thought he had received a nod and wink of approval for the invasion from John Foster Dulles, the US secretary of state. He should have checked with Dwight D Eisenhower, who was enraged by the action. He forced through the UN resolution imposing a ceasefire, and made it clear that in this matter at any rate, Britain would have no 'special relationship' with the USA





The final straw for Eden came when the Treasury told the government that sterling, under sustained attack over the crisis, needed urgent US support to the tune of a billion dollars. 'Ike' had a crisp reply: no ceasefire, no loan. The invaders were ordered to halt, and await the arrival of a UN intervention force





What fatally undermined the Conservative government, however, was the dissent in its own ranks. Less than 50 years ago, there were plenty of Tories who still believed in the virtues of empire. But there was also a new generation which recognised the damage being done to Britain's real interests in the new world, and which was outraged by Eden's blinkered approach. Two junior ministers, Edward Boyle and Anthony Nutting, resigned from the government in protest against Suez. Among those who stayed on, but who expressed deep reservations about the Suez enterprise, was RA 'Rab' Butler, the man widely seen as Eden's heir apparent






Eden himself was shattered by Suez, politically, physically and emotionally. On November 19, just three days before the last of the British invaders finally left the canal zone, he abruptly took himself off to Jamaica to recover, leaving behind Rab Butler in charge of the cabinet. On January 9, 1957, Eden resigned. The Conservative mandarins who controlled the leadership promptly took their revenge on Butler, seen as the leading liberal in the party, by elevating the more rightwing Harold Macmillan to Downing Street.



www.theguardian.com...



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:26 AM
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a reply to: alldaylong
That was an interesting read, cheers mate



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Seems to me, the real question is should there be a next PM in the UK?

Considering how broken our current form of governance appears to be and the way in which the inept disingenuous shower of bastards that run the show are acting.
edit on 11-12-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Something I'd forgotten about;

It would be interesting if Rees-Mogg was appointed Leader of The Conservative Party as Roman Catholics are effectively banned from being Prime Minister.

No Catholic has ever been PM.
Tony Blair intended to convert to Catholicism during his tenure as Prime Minister but was advised/warned against it and he waited until he'd resigned before he actually did convert.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:50 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn
That is interesting.
I knew he was a religious nut due to his personal views on abortion, he thinks rape victims should not be allowed to abort.
He reckons it doesn't matter what he thinks because the law is already in place and there are no calls to change it.
He's a slippery one though for sure, proper weasel if you ask me...a posh weasel.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: Freeborn

That is a interesting point but I would like to think that as a nation we are kind of over all of that and his religious views wouldn't come into it.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 08:56 AM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin
I struggle with strongly religious people of faith, I question their logic and rationality.
I can't help it, It is because I don't believe in unverifiable claims of gods and can't imagine why any reasoned thinking person would.
It does influence my opinion on people, not a bad way, but questioning their logic for sure.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:15 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

One thing i do admire, to a degree, about our religious types, is their conviction and unwavering belief, nevermind it must also instill a measure of enormous piece of mind.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake
I worry if it affects their political beliefs though, as in the case of Rees-Mogg and abortion.
He probably thinks being gay is a 'sin' as well.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:29 AM
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Raab or McVey. Two bastards of the highest order. Perfect for the job.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: CornishCeltGuy

Oh that Muppet is a prime candidate for abortion if ever there was one.

Supprised really he's not the poster boy for the Pro-Choice movement. LoL

I imagine he does think being gay is a sin hence his stance on same-sex marriage.




edit on 11-12-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:32 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol
Haha! There aren't any decent choices I can see on either side of the political spectrum.
I can see Corbyn stealing a coalition with the SNP if there was a snap election called, who knows where that would lead, probably bankrupt again and remaining in the EU.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:32 AM
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I don't think there is a law preventing Catholics being PM, just would be constitutionally difficult.

As for Blair, I think he thought that being able to say a few "hail Mary's" might keep him out of Hell, what with all the blood on his hands and everything.



posted on Dec, 11 2018 @ 09:35 AM
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a reply to: oldcarpy

The Queen and her ilk may have plenty to say on the matter, at least in private.

Don't imagine that mob and our aristocracy still don't take that crap seriously, because they do im afraid.




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