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Checking weapons for functionality - don't take it as a given it's same as when put away

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posted on Dec, 9 2018 @ 11:24 PM
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I decided to check my mag release on my pistol and found it impossible for the button to be pushed and the mag wouldn't drop out. I had to use a pipe wrench to press the button and also pry the mag out of the handle. It was also next to impossible for me to draw the slide back and when I finally got it to slide I had a failure to eject b/c the round was "glued" in the barrel!

The mag had what looked like some kind of glue on the outside of the body, it was hard and clear, there were a few spots where there was some sticky part around the middle of a large "puddle" of the glue. I tried water, rubbing alcohol, methanol, ethanol and some other petrochemical solvents and none of them removed this material, even with aggressive scrubbing. I had to use a stainless steel wire brush bit on a dremel at 10,000 rpm and it was still difficult to remove, it just had to grind away at it.

The bullets, 1/2 were nickel plated the other half brass, all has become corroded on the cartridge (the copper bullet had only darkened though..) which is really odd for a nickel plated case to corrode as it did - nickel is one of the most resistant metals to corrosion and it needed some kind of strong acid and oxidizer for it to corrode like that, which is a total mystery how that could have gotten there (while safely stored). Wire brush was needed again to clean them up and it was a very difficult task as well.

So now I'm left with the almost impossible task of cleaning the inside of the mag, I could take it apart but it isn't very easy to do, I think it's a Beretta mag use in a diff gun. IDK if the hammer is clogged/sticky at all but it seems to fire w/o a round in it.

What is most concerning is if I had needed to use the weapon before checking it as it would have completely failed after the first shot and how and what could have possible caused this b/c I would never have put anything corrosive or sticky around the weapon and no one has been around it that I am aware of.

So just an example to check your weapon more often than "never", lol. I now understand why military and police check their weapons often and thoroughly.

Edit: - After taking the slide and barrel out, I found it was all gummed up but semi-functional. It seems almost impossible for it to have gotten both inside the slide/on the barrel and inside the magazine/handle of the gun. Very very odd....
edit on 12 9 2018 by DigginFoTroof because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 9 2018 @ 11:35 PM
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I don't use my guns very often but do clean and inspect them every three years or so to make sure everything is ok. My Eagle had a chunk of wood stuck into the mechinism for some reason a few years ago, I don't know where it came from. Maybe I was cleaning it up and had some pieces of wood on me from making fire wood for the woodstove. Who knows, it would never have chambered properly and fired with that wood in the slide.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 12:03 AM
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You need to invest in a dehumidifier (or use desiccant) for your safe, how long had it been in storage since the last time it was checked? As far as the glue like substance hell if I know what it could I highly doubt it was excess oil that had caked up. If it was near as bad as you described it that mag should probably just be tossed and replaced or even if you can clean it up I wouldn’t use it for defensive loads just target/training you don’t want to get in a situation where you need it to perform and the follower decides to stick again. Also why would have a mix match of rounds in the mag? One factor that might have increased the rate of corrosion might be dissimilar Metal electrolysis if it was in a very moist environment. If they nickel coated brass doesn’t just have superficial surface corrosion something doesn’t add up.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 02:04 AM
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originally posted by: BigDave-AR
You need to invest in a dehumidifier (or use desiccant) for your safe, how long had it been in storage since the last time it was checked? As far as the glue like substance hell if I know what it could I highly doubt it was excess oil that had caked up. If it was near as bad as you described it that mag should probably just be tossed and replaced or even if you can clean it up I wouldn’t use it for defensive loads just target/training you don’t want to get in a situation where you need it to perform and the follower decides to stick again. Also why would have a mix match of rounds in the mag? One factor that might have increased the rate of corrosion might be dissimilar Metal electrolysis if it was in a very moist environment. If they nickel coated brass doesn’t just have superficial surface corrosion something doesn’t add up.


I fired it about 2-3 months ago so it hasn't been sitting for long and the mags were filled at that point.

The material seemed like an epoxy of some kind or maybe even something like superglue, both of which I use but never around my weapons, unless I'm doing some kind of repair on a stock or something.

I've never had a problem with these rounds being in contact with each other. There were a few spots on the brass rounds that had dark brown spots which were a little difficult to brush off with the wire wheel, they left a few faint brown/golden spots that look similar to water drops.

The nickel cases brushed up much nicer with no sign of prior corrosion. The corrosion on these was greenish which is a sign of nickel salts and some copper salts.

I ended up taking the magazine apart and it cleaned up well with the same process, it's actually smoother than a new one. Also did the same with the gun and polished the barrel, did a deep clean of any powder residue and now it is nicer and smoother than when I got it!

Either way, I still have no idea what got in it or how it happened, which is kind of as important as getting it cleaned up...



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 04:36 AM
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Two differing metals with a medium that allows for conductive electron flow between them, will always have a measurable amount of current flow homie. You probably just had an example of diodes style electroplating happening at the speed of sloooow.
This action would come with thermal differentiation. That could have liquification some solids, eventually ending with them making a nice hard cake when the heat is all gone from a complete loss of energy/corroded connection. Your mag had a case of 9volt battery on tongue for a month. Something went off during it, and turned solid again when the battery was out of juice.

Assuming this was all storage action, this is the best I got that doesn't include pests/insects or an angry antigunner.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 04:59 AM
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originally posted by: Archivalist
Two differing metals with a medium that allows for conductive electron flow between them, will always have a measurable amount of current flow homie. You probably just had an example of diodes style electroplating happening at the speed of sloooow.
This action would come with thermal differentiation. That could have liquification some solids, eventually ending with them making a nice hard cake when the heat is all gone from a complete loss of energy/corroded connection. Your mag had a case of 9volt battery on tongue for a month. Something went off during it, and turned solid again when the battery was out of juice.

Assuming this was all storage action, this is the best I got that doesn't include pests/insects or an angry antigunner.


Good suggestions and I thought about galvanic cell response as well but after your post I checked my other mags and one had alternating nickel/brass rounds and they were fine, the other had random combinations and was fine as well.

This seems more like the kind of thing where your seat belt won't release, it sticks, and when you finally get it out and take it apart you find peanut butter and jelly all inside the buckle clip and have no idea WTF that came from (looks at kids and GF with suspicious eyes...).



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 05:51 AM
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YIKES!!....the words "pipe wrench" and "firearm" don't even belong in the same book, let alone the same paragraph!! Same goes for words like "pry" and "stainless steel brush"...OMG....sent chills right down my spine! Seriously! I hope you were just kidding!

On a more serious note, a couple comments come to mind here:

1. Was the firearm cleaned and lubricated following the last time you used it?

2. Specifically what cleaning agent and which lubricant do you use (by name)?

Good grief, I've never, ever, had a firearm foul like what you describe...ever. I even left a shotgun out in a rainstorm one time (by accident) and it didn't foul that badly!

A couple things you might try (just a suggestion). First, field strip the firearm and thoroughly clean it with a quality cleaner like Hoppe's No. 9 or Ballistol. Remove all debris and fouling from the barrel, slide, breech and mag well. Pay particular attention to the inside of the slide and corresponding grooves on the frame. Use a brass brush and cleaning patches to do this. If the barrel is heavily fouled you can use a de-fouling agent like Sweets 7.62 solvent (but don't get this on anything but the inside of the barrel!). Make sure to lubricate the barrel with a patch and some gun oil. Then reassemble the firearm and apply some dry lubricant like Remington Rem-Drilube or Tetra Gun Dry Finish (if you can find it) to the slide area. Spray your mag well and mags down with either Ballistol or Kroil and clean any debris from them. Remove any excess oil and re-insert. Check for function. If action is still not smooth, rinse and repeat.

In your case, I'd probably go ahead and completely disassemble the firearm removing the grips, trigger group and firing mechanism for thorough cleaning and moisture removal as well.

You mentioned a Beretta mag...is this firearm a Beretta? If so, I'm doubly shocked! The Beretta 92 (and it's brethren like the M9) are some of the smoothest and most rugged actions in the world.

Just out of curiosity, what is the make and model of the firearm you're having issues with?



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 07:15 AM
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Unheard of man, you are going through some kind of reality test...the old goop come from nowhere poolin. My s w 44 got a stain on tis side unexplained.....but yours wins you have an enigma....so fun after they're figured out....mind bender till then hehe
edit on 10-12-2018 by GBP/JPY because: IN THE FINE TEXAS TRADITION



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 07:38 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

At work I carry a 9mm slim, and afterwork around town and out of...I carry a 45 acp dbl stack.
Recently...and in your support here...I discovered myself in 2 different situations*.

*Eta: they are usually never secured anywhere, because they both are with me 24/7....

1. 9mm, I noticed flaking skin (looks like dust) in the barrel and trigger mech....because of where I carry....2 o'clock, inside rt waistband...even tho I wipe it in an out frequently btwn lubes.
2. I reached for my 45 before a shower...and found the mag had separated in position and wouldve dropped out had I not noticed!*

*ETA they sell covers for the opening next to a loaded-inserted semi-automatic mag to keep dust and debri out...costs like a buck or 2.
edit on 10-12-2018 by mysterioustranger because: Oops



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Sounds like sabotage. I think someone in your family has been turned. Trust no one.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

I've pretty much given up on CC, too many things like that can happen.

I just OC now, screw it. Seatbelts can still be a problem, but I make a point to always check my mag when I get out of the car. Even a lot of times driving in the car I'll check it. It's less of a problem with a left mag release only. Those ambi's are problematic for just this reason...especially for a strong side right.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: Woodcarver

Heh, I actually agree!

I'd definitely be looking REAL hard for the root cause of that issue!! That one would not get a pass as just a kwinky-dink...no way!



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 08:50 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: mysterioustranger

I've pretty much given up on CC, too many things like that can happen.

I just OC now, screw it. Seatbelts can still be a problem, but I make a point to always check my mag when I get out of the car. Even a lot of times driving in the car I'll check it. It's less of a problem with a left mag release only. Those ambi's are problematic for just this reason...especially for a strong side right.


This is really the 1st time ever...in over 30-some years....I found the mag in place, but dislodged.

Tho I am pretty conciencious all the time...that was pretty surprising...and yes, 1 round was chambered...but still.*!*

**CC'ers!? Maintain your weapons. I'm dilligent, daily...yet mag release was still engaged!! Be safe everyone!



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 09:01 AM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
A couple things you might try (just a suggestion). First, field strip the firearm and thoroughly clean it with a quality cleaner like Hoppe's No. 9 or Ballistol. Remove all debris and fouling from the barrel, slide, breech and mag well. Pay particular attention to the inside of the slide and corresponding grooves on the frame. Use a brass brush and cleaning patches to do this. If the barrel is heavily fouled you can use a de-fouling agent like Sweets 7.62 solvent (but don't get this on anything but the inside of the barrel!). Make sure to lubricate the barrel with a patch and some gun oil. Then reassemble the firearm and apply some dry lubricant like Remington Rem-Drilube or Tetra Gun Dry Finish (if you can find it) to the slide area. Spray your mag well and mags down with either Ballistol or Kroil and clean any debris from them. Remove any excess oil and re-insert. Check for function. If action is still not smooth, rinse and repeat.


I think if someone is allowing their firearms to get that badly fouled owner-cleaning is probably not the best route, I'd say just take it to a gunsmith and allow them to give the gun an electrolysis bath.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 09:29 AM
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After I made the OP I disassembled and cleaned the whole thing very well, about as clean as it could be w/o being brand new. I did find the sticky crap in the rails on the receiver/handle/grip as well as the metal slide. That is why it was so darn hard to pull the slide back, now it's better than when I got it!

The stainless steel wire brush isn't that rough. It's is VERY fine wire 34-38gauge probably and even when turning 5-10,000 rpm on the Dremel it doesn't chew up skin when it touches it. I'd say it is about as abrasive as those green SOS scouring pads, maybe even less so. It actually just buffs polycarbonate/ABS mix plastics (the stuff power tool battery packs and power-drill casings are made of very often). The wires fly out when a lot of pressure is put on it so it has a "saftey" mechanism kind of so it doesn't destroy metals, even aluminum or copper.

I didn't have my gun cleaning stuff with me so I used rubbing alcohol on the slide, barrel and mags along with lots of cotton swabs, pads and old tee-shirt's. After I oiled with a 3-in-1 household oil I've been using on an old 22 for 30+ years (outside of barrel and bolt).

As far as how this happened I'm still puzzled. The only thing I can think of is I put a mag down on something sticky (epoxy like) and then loaded the gun. That doesn't really explain how it covered the inside wall of the mag (inner casing of magazine) though. All other mags stored at same time & with it were not effected which seems to point to a misplacement on some nasty surface w/o realizing it.

Now if it happens again after being more careful, then I will have a different view.
edit on 12 10 2018 by DigginFoTroof because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Great PSA


I don't clean my weapon daily, but I do at least inspect it for any serious malfunctions or other safety conditions

It gets a light cleaning at least once a week and a field strip any time it gets wet/dirty or monthly (whatever comes first)

A clean/inspected/well cared for weapon is a happy weapon


Like you said, it is simply too important to risk having any sort of failure during a deadly force encounter

Anyone else here do a "press check" ? I know I know it is supposedly a bad habit, and with loaded chamber visible on the Gen 4 Glocks it is even less relevant, but I still do it. Old habit I guess

edit on 12/10/2018 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 11:28 AM
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You shouldn't store a loaded weapon for years.
It will corrode.
I bought an old Mosin-Nagant that had been coated in cosmoline and stored for decades.
Cleaned it up with kerosene and a rag, oiled it up, and it was still working like a hoss.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 11:28 AM
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You shouldn't store a loaded weapon for years.
It will corrode.
I bought an old Mosin-Nagant that had been coated in cosmoline and stored for decades.
Cleaned it up with kerosene and a rag, oiled it up, and it was still working like a hoss.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Do you have a child who is subjected to government-funded brainwashing on a daily basis? I'm just speculating but maybe said child received instruction from said brainwasher to glue up daddy's guns.



posted on Dec, 10 2018 @ 03:43 PM
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My first thought was like what Archivalist said. Two different types of metals in contact can corrode in the presence of an electrolyte. Electrolytes aren't just in sports drink or water. Depending on what the air is like where you live and how you stored your firearm could have contributed to the condition that you found it in. I want to say that some sort of chemical reaction occurred with the corrosion and the gun powder inside of the rounds, but from what you've stated it sounds like all of the round appeared to be visually fine.

Furthermore, I would like to place emphasis on what Skunkape typed. It's not a good practice to store a firearm for an extended period of time while loaded. This is for multiple reasons. One it could weaken the spring in your magaazine. Two rounds can go bad over time. Especially when you find the whole set in the condition you have. I wouldn't trust those rounds. They may seem fine from a simple visual inspection, but you have no idea of the condition of the gunpowder, primer, or inside wall of the casing. Go ahead and dispose of them and buy a new box of ammo.

a reply to: JBurns

I carry a Walther PPQ M2. It has a round indicator as well, but I still press check solely out of habit.




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