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transcript of the 12-7-18 comey interview with redactions

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posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 07:38 PM
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(ratcliff talking about IG report)Page 141, the top of the page. See where it says: "Comey told us"?
Mr. Comey. Yes, sir.
Mr. Ratcliffe. So I'm reading for the record: Comey told us that he did not remember discussing with anyone the possibility of subpoenaing Clinton before the grand jury. However, he stated: At that point, I really didn't think there was a there there. And the question was, is she going to lie to us? Did I read that correctly?

Mr. Comey. Yes, you read it correctly.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Does that refresh your recollection?
Mr. Comey. It really doesn't. I'm sure I said this because it's a transcript from the IG interview, but I don't -- I honestly don't remember saying that. It seems reasonable, though.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Well, as you read that, if it's accurately -- if you're accurately quoted, it sounds like you had your mind made up about whether or not Hillary Clinton was going to be prosecuted for the mishandling of classified information before her interview.

Mr. Comey. I don't think that's exactly right. My judgment going into the interview was that we had not found sufficient evidence to recommend prosecution for any substantive offenses related to the mishandling of classified information. Still a possibility that she would lie to us and give us an opening to prosecute her or that there would be further investigation. But going into it, based on almost a year of investigation, I didn't see a substantive case there.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Do you recall, Director Comey, an exchange that you and I had? You appeared before the House Judiciary Committee on September 28th of 2016, and I asked you a question. I said: Did you make the decision not to prosecute or not to charge Hillary Clinton for the mishandling of classified information before or after her July 2nd, 2016, interview? And your answer was: After. Do you recall that?

Mr. Comey. Yep.
Mr. Ratcliffe. When I asked you how that could possibly be the case, your response was: If colleagues of ours think I'm lying, please have them contact me privately. Now, I will tell you, Director, when I asked you that question and you gave me that answer, there were a number of things that I was not aware of. One of the things that I didn't know was that the day before the interview, the Hillary Clinton interview on July 1st, Lisa Page texted Peter Strzok about Loretta Lynch and her decision to follow your recommendation, and said, quote: Yeah, it's a real profile in courage, since she -- meaning Lynch -- knows no charges will be brought. Do you recall reading that text anywhere, or hearing about it?

Mr. Comey. I don't remember I read it. I think I've heard about it in the media.

Mr. Ratcliffe. It's also in the inspector general report. Did you read the inspect or general report?

Mr. Comey. I did, so I must have seen it there. Yes, I read it, so I must have seen it there.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Well, the text doesn't -- doesn't say that Hillary Clinton might not be charged or that charges probably won't be brought. It says that the Attorney General knows that charges won't be brought. Do you have any explanation for why Lisa Page, Peter Strzok, and Attorney General Loretta Lynch might have known that Hillary Clinton wasn't going to be charged before her July 2nd, 2016, interview if you hadn't made the decision yet?

Mr. Comey. I don't. I don't know what she means in there or what the nature of the communication was.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Could it be based on one of the other things that I didn't know when you and I had that exchange, and that was the fact that I didn't know that 2 months before that July 2nd interview, on May the 2nd, you had actually circulated a draft memo of a public announcement stating that neither you nor any reasonable prosecutor would charge Hillary Clinton with the mishandling of classified information. Do you recall that?

Mr. Comey. I'm sorry. Recall what, Mr. Ratcliffe?

Mr. Ratcliffe. Recall that memo?
Mr. Comey. Sure. I recall a variety of drafts in May of that memo.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Would you agree with me that that draft of that memo certainly would be or its contents would appear to be inconsistent with the testimony that I just related that you and I had in September of 2016?
Mr. Comey. No, I don't agree.

bottom of page 39- top of page 42
so it seems Ratcliff was going for some kind of "gotcha" moment with his questioning and attempting to question how Page and Sarzok would know something before comey had decided and asked why comey was not going to recommend prosecution based on his opinion so kind of getting some more meat in the document but seems to be Comey does not recall much from his end times with the FBI




posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 07:52 PM
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42-to mid page 47. longer exchange this time

Mr. Ratcliffe. Who's Jim Rybicki?
Mr. Comey. Jim Rybicki was my chief of staff. As -- I'm sorry.
Mr. Ratcliffe. One of the things that I didn't know when you and I had that exchange was how Mr. Rybicki was going to 43 testify. And he has testified that the only charges that could have come out of her interview would have been false statements to an FBI agent, not any violations of the Espionage Act. Would you agree with Mr. Rybicki's testimony?

Mr. Comey. No, I would not. I'm not familiar with it, but assuming it's what you just summarized, I would not.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Well, I think I've related to you that at least a number of folks -- Peter Strzok, Lisa Page, Loretta Lynch, Jim Rybicki -- all seem to have the idea that Hillary Clinton wasn't going to be charged for the mishandling of classified information -- she might be charged for lying to the FBI -- but that she wasn't going to be charged for the mishandling of classified information. Do you still think that the answer that you gave me on Septembe r 28 of 2016 was an accurate statement?

Mr. Comey. I do.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Do you think that that statement was at all misleading to me or other Members of Congress?
Mr. Comey. I guess I can't speak to your mental state. It wasn't intended to be misleading.
Mr. Ratcliffe. You didn't answer my question when I asked it by saying: Well, I had pretty much made the decision that she wasn't going to be charged because everyone knew I had circulated a draft memo. You didn't say to me what you said to the inspector general, that you really didn't think there was no there there. You just said no. Do you think that's a candid statement?

Mr. Comey. I do. I do.
Mr. Ratcliffe. So your testimony then is the same as it is today, that when you went into the Hillary Clinton -- or when the FBI and the Department of Justice went in to interview Hillary Clinton, a decision had not been made about whether or not to prosecute her for anything and all charges were still on the table at that point?

Mr. Comey. Correct. The final decision of what our recommendation would be had not been made.
Mr. Ratcliffe. The final decision.
Mr. Comey. Well, sure. You'd be incompetent if you didn't have a view of the case after a year. And, as I said, as I said to the inspector general, it didn't look to me like there was a substantive case there. But you're about to interview the subject, and so you want to keep your mind open to the possibility that you will develop something that needs to be pursued.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Well, that's a great explanation. Why didn't you give me that explanation in September of 2016 when I asked you that question?
Mr. Comey. It's an explanation, Mr. Ratcliffe, that's entirely consistent with the answer I gave you. I don't remember you asking me to explain why I say that. If you did, I'm sorry if I didn't answer that question, but they're consistent.

Mr. Ratcliffe. So it was a serious interview with Hillary Clinton that was about to take place intended at getting at the truth o f everything that was troubling you?
Mr. Comey. That's not how I thought about it. It was about interviewing the subject near the close of a year - long investigation.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Okay. So, when the team of FBI agents and lawyers interviewed Hillary Clinton, what questions did they ask Secretary Clinton about the tarmac meeting?
Mr. Comey. I don't know.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Would that be reflected in the 302 or in the FBI summary of the interview?

Mr. Comey. I would expect so. You're asking about whether they asked Hillary Clinton about the meeting that Bill Clinton had with Loretta Lynch.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Yes.
Mr. Comey. I don't know whether they asked that. I would expect if it was asked, it would likely be reflected in the 302. Mr . Ratcliffe. Would you like to review those?
Mr. Comey. Not unless you really want me to.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Well, I've read them, and I've asked folks about them. There's no mention of the word "tarmac" or "Loretta Lynch" anywhere that appears in the 3 02 or the summary that the FBI has made publicly available. So my question is, do you know whether or not any questions were asked about that tarmac meeting?

Mr. Comey. It's the same answer; I don't know.
Mr. Ratcliffe. So 5 days after the Attorney General meets with the spouse of a subject on a tarmac, the meeting that a lot of folks are talking about and that raised concerns enough to be one of the reasons that caused you to take the actions that you took in holding the press conference, none of those folks in the room thought about asking Hillary Clinton any questions about that?

Mr. Comey. I don't know what they thought. And, as I said earlier, I don't know whether she was asked about that.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Would that have been a reasonable question to Secretary Clinton, what did your husband discuss about this case, if anything, 5 days ago with the Attorney General?

Mr. Comey. I don't know the answer to that. As it relates to her mishandling of classified information as Secretary of State, I don't know.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Well, I thought you were looking for any crimes, not just the mishandling of information.

Mr. Comey. The FBI doesn't investigate people to find any crimes.

Mr. Ratcliffe. I didn't say investigate people, but in the course of investigating if you become aware of things that cause concern to investigators, like you've expressed you had, isn't there an obligation to pursue that?
Mr. Comey. Hard to answer in the abstract. Depends upon what the facts were that you had . But sure, if you develop facts in the course of an investigation of the possible commission of another crime, in almost all circumstances, you follow up on it. I don't know what that would drive, in terms of the interview of Hillary Clinton.

Mr. Ratcliffe. So do you know what questions the agents or prosecutors asked Hillary Clinton about that troubling information that we talked before about potential compromise of Attorney General Lynch with respect to her objectivity?

Mr. Comey. I don't know whether they asked any questions that related to Loretta Lynch of Hillary Clinton


so more info and he seems to be trying to imply that comey either mislead or had allready made up his mind but the convo seems to imply Hillary was never asked about the Lynch meeting on the tarmac and it seems to be implied Mr ratcliff seems to think comey is being dishonest or at least deliberately unclear others can feel free to correct me if they think i am ignorant or incorrect on the matter



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 07:56 PM
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a reply to: RalagaNarHallas

I'm giving each of your posts a STAR for effort and time invested. Thank-you!



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 07:59 PM
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as im mostly posting and not getting reply's im gonna just start quoting segments at a time then making a larger post where i post my feelings on the matter instead of adding snippets to each section which is normally standard for posts on ats just hope people can bear with me as im basically copy pasting an entire 245 page pdf lol as from reading ahead a bit im almost to the part where they take their first break where i my self may take a short break to finish up some chores before continuing my self imposed ordeal lol



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

thank you and im trying to not let my own biases color my posts too much just go off what each segment states and my personal opinion of it is but its not always the easiest to remove all forms of bias so i hope im not coming off as too one sided and if so i apologize



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:04 PM
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cutting in

tweet


Q
‏ @WeAreOne_Q

James Comey:

“I don’t recall”—8 times
“I don’t remember”—71 times
“I don’t know”—166 times

AND he said he didn’t know that
Christopher Steele was passing information to Bruce Ohr, who was giving it to the FBI.


😎👀



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: RalagaNarHallas
as im mostly posting and not getting reply's im gonna just start quoting segments at a time then making a larger post where i post my feelings on the matter instead of adding snippets to each section which is normally standard for posts on ats just hope people can bear with me as im basically copy pasting an entire 245 page pdf lol as from reading ahead a bit im almost to the part where they take their first break where i my self may take a short break to finish up some chores before continuing my self imposed ordeal lol



Im not replying to all of your posts, but Im reading all of your posts. Im not reading from your link so keep the excerpts coming until you get bored/tired.



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:16 PM
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47-mid 51

Mr. Ratcliffe. If they did, it should be reflected in the 302 or the FBI summary of the interview, correct?

Mr. Comey. You would expect that in the ordinary course. The only reason I'm hesitating is that I don't know whether questions were asked about that, but if questions are asked and the answer may implicate -- may be considered classified, sometimes that's not put in the 302. But I don't know whether that's the case here.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Weren't those questions that you wanted answered?
Mr. Comey. Of Hillary Clinton?
Mr. Ratcliffe. Of anyone that could answer a question about whether or not there was any problem with the objectivity of the Attorney General, based on contacts with the Clinton campaign.
Mr. Comey. I did not see anything that led me to conclude that Loretta Lynch was acting inappropriately in supervising the Department of Justice in that investigation. The appearance of conflict or the appearance that she was compromised in some fashion was what drove me to separate myself from her in July.

Mr. Ratcliffe. So, as you've already mentioned, one of the things you thought might happen or you wanted to find out was whether or not Hillary Clinton m ight lie during that interview. Knowingly making a false statement to the FBI is a crime, correct?
Mr. Comey. That is correct.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Making a false public statement ordinarily is not a crime, correct?
Mr. Comey. That is correct. Thank goodness, for a lot of people.
Mr. Ratcliffe. But false statements made in public can be evidence of knowledge or intent, absence of mistake, or provide all kinds of other evidentiary context, correct?
Mr. Comey. Potentially, yes.
Mr. Ratcliffe. In fact, correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't David Petraeus' comments, false comments in public a basis for why you argued that he had knowledge or intent to commit the crime of mishandling classified information?

Mr. Comey. I don't remember that about the Petraeus case, that public statements figured in it.
Mr. Ratcliffe. You don't recall, or it didn't happen?

Mr. Comey. Well, I don't remember it being a feature, so it's possible I'm just not remembering or that it didn't happen. It just -- as I think about that case, I don't remember anything about public statements as a factor in that case. I remember a lot about lying to the agents during an interview, but not public statements.

Mr. Ratcliffe. All right. So let me ask you about Hillary Clinton's public statements. Do you recall Secretary Clinton publicly stating that she neither sent nor received classified information?
Mr. Comey. I don't specifically in her public statements, so I don't specifically.

Mr. Ratcliffe. If there were those public statements, would you have expected the agents to ask her about that during her interview? Mr. Comey. I don't know. I would expect them to ask about what she was thinking when she communicated in the way she did, but whether to ask her, "Did you say on the campaign trail X or Y," I don't know. That would be up to their judgment.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Do you recall Secretary Clinton making that same statement under oath before Congress?
Mr. Comey. I don't.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Do you recall -- maybe I can refresh your recollection. I think, on October 22nd of 2015, in response to a question from Congressman Jordan, Secretary Clinton said, quote, "There was nothing marked classified in my emails either sent or received," end quote. Does that refresh your recollection about Secretary Clinton making that statement?

Mr. Comey. I don't -- it doesn't help me with her testimony, but I actually do remember being asked, maybe by Mr. Jordan, when I testified about whether that was accurate or not.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Is it accurate?
Mr. Comey. My recollection is there were -- I hope I don't get this wrong. In some email, there was a letter C deep in the email to mark some of the paragraphs that looked to us like portion markings, as I recall. And I'm sorry if I'm misrecalling that, but I have the recollection of that.

Mr. Ratcliffe. Well, I have your public statement on July 5th. I think you mentioned the fact that there were actually three emails that were marked classified.
Mr. Comey. When I talked on July the 5th?
Mr. Ratcliffe. Yes.
Mr. Comey. Okay.
Mr. Ratcliffe. Any reason to -- Mr. Kelley. Do you have a copy of that statement we can take a look at?

Mr. Ratcliffe. I do. Do you have -- as you review that, do you independently have a recollection about Hillary Clinton's July 2nd interview where agents asked her questions about those classification markings, whether it appeared on one document or multiple documents?
Mr. Comey. I don't.
Mr. Ratcliffe. You don't have any recollection?
Mr. Comey. No, I don't have an independent recollection, sitting here, of what they asked her about that. I have some recollection that the topic came up, but I don't remember what was asked or said about that.


this is about where they take their first break but it seems at least to me that Ratcliff is some what skeptical about Comeys statements and answers but as i said i know next to nothing about the man



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

hehe ive never been one to skip to the last chapter of the book but that is interesting lol im devoted to copying this but even i haven't been counting all the i don't know posts etc so who ever did that has far more patience then me



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:22 PM
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Comey is obviously being as obtuse as he possibly can to protect himself and others. They should just skip all this and have him shipped to Guantanamo for some loosening up of his memory.



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:28 PM
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mid 51-to end of 52 its a nice stopping point as this is the end of republican questions before letting the democrats have a go then they take a 30 minute break

Mr. Ratcliffe. What do you recall about -- you mentioned the letter C coming up during that interview and what that might mean?

Mr. Comey. I don't -- I'm sorry. Do you want me to still look at the statement? So far, I haven't found the thing about the C, so I'll pause there for a second. I don't remember what came up in her interview about that. What I was referring to earlier is I remember some member I think of the Judiciary Committee asking me about that portion marking that appeared -- I was thinking in one email, but it sounds like you think there's more than one. I don't see anything, sir, in my statement -- I could be missing it -- about the portion marking.

Mr. Ratcliffe. I will resume with that when we resume our questioning.

Mr. Comey. Okay.

Chairman Goodlatte. I think, in the interest of expediency, we'll proceed with the Democrats right now, and then we'll take a 30 - minute lunch break after the Democrats.
so to the point we are at what says ATS how has comey done?

how have the questioners done any "ah ha" moments

i kind of assume the answers will fall along partisan lines sadly but hey it is what it is



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:33 PM
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Here is an excellent summary/analysis of James Comey's testimony. John Solomon is one of the few REAL reporter-journalists who have closely followed and written what SPYGATE is all about.

Comey Testimony Analysis: thehill.com...

Even with all the question-avoidance, Comey did verify that the FBI was ILLEGALLY obtaining FISA Spy Warrants in 2016 and 2017.
edit on 12/8/2018 by carewemust because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:35 PM
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originally posted by: RalagaNarHallas

Mr. Ratcliffe. Weren't those questions that you wanted answered?
Mr. Comey. Of Hillary Clinton?
Mr. Ratcliffe. Of anyone that could answer a question about whether or not there was any problem with the objectivity of the Attorney General, based on contacts with the Clinton campaign.
Mr. Comey. I did not see anything that led me to conclude that Loretta Lynch was acting inappropriately in supervising the Department of Justice in that investigation. The appearance of conflict or the appearance that she was compromised in some fashion was what drove me to separate myself from her in July.

Mr. Ratcliffe. So, as you've already mentioned, one of the things you thought might happen or you wanted to find out was whether or not Hillary Clinton m ight lie during that interview. Knowingly making a false statement to the FBI is a crime, correct?
Mr. Comey. That is correct.


Here we see Comey dodging the Loretta Lynch problem.

Big deflection !! 😎👱‍♀️



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:38 PM
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so now the democrats begin their questions top of page 53- top of page 56 gonna go a bit faster this time


Ms. Chen. Okay. The time is 11:32, and we're back on the record for the Democrat's first round. Mr. Cohen, if you would like to ask a few questions.

Mr. Cohen. Are we ready?
Mr. Comey. Yes, sir. Mr. Cohen. Thank you.
I'm Steve Cohen from Tennessee. First thing I'd like to ask you, Mr. Comey, is, Mr. Trump asked you once to lay off the Flynn investigation, and I was just wondering what your reaction was to his having pled guilty and him having, according to Mr. Mueller, provided much truthful information that is apparently going to be a part of the investigation that Mr. Mue ller is pursuing. What was your reaction? Did you feel kind of good that you didn't tell Mr. Trump that you would be loyal and drop that investigation? How did it make you feel?

Mr. Comey. Well, there was no chance at all that I was going to abide that direction to let that go. When I saw the public accounts of his plea and cooperation, I felt, as a citizen, glad that he was held accountable for his crimes and that he was assisting the United States. So it seemed to me like a just outcome.

Mr. Cohen. Did Mr. Trump or anybody else in the administration ever ask you anything about specifics about the Russia involvement in the 2016 election?
Ms. Bessee. Congressman, to the extent it goes into the purview of the special counsel, the witness will not be able to answer that question.

Mr. Cohen. Let me ask you this, Mr. Comey: There was a memo that some had said had something to do -- and you maybe even said -- had something to do with your going forth on July 5 to announce that you and not the Attorney General was going to not investigate and go further with the Clinton email investigation, and that that memo was something that the FBI had in their possession for some time concerning, allegedly, Attorney General Lynch communicating to Ms. Renteria that this was going to be kind of not going to be pursued and not to worry about it. And then later, I think, many think that that was really a Russian operative that got somehow some information that wasn't true and got it into the Justice Department. Do you know what I'm talking about?

Mr. Comey. I know generally, and I have to tread carefully here, because I think the underlying material is still classified. So there was material -- this is what I've said publicly, and so I'll say it again, there was material that was classified that if unclassified, released, would open the Attorney General up to the accusation -- whether it was true or not -- the accusation that she had not been acting fairly and impartially in overseeing the investigation. So far as I knew at the time, and still think, the material itself was genuine, which is a separate question, though, from whether it was what it said was accurate.

Mr. Cohen. When you say it was genuine, I mean, did you not think that at this point that it was conjured up by the Russians to try to maybe influence actions at the Justice Department or at the FBI?
Mr. Comey. We didn't think that at the time. I don't know whether that view has changed.
Mr. Cohen. Okay. Was Peter Strzok considered the top counterintelligence FBI agent?
Mr. Comey. I don't know whether Peter Strzok was considered the top. He was very highly regarded as a counterintelligence professional, and I saw that borne out in the nature and quality of his work with me. But whether he's the top or not, I don't know, but certainly among the best.

Mr. Cohen. In the past, had his work not resulted in the outing of some Russian spies and their being returned to Russian, expelled from this country?
Mr. Comey. I don't remember specifically. I just remember his reputation was very, very strong in the counterintelligence world.
Mr. Cohen. So it would make sense that he would be assigned to this investigation?
Mr. Comey. It would make sense that he'd be assigned to the investigation into the potential mishandling of classified information by Secretary Clinton. It would also make sense he'd be assigned to the Russia investigations. Mr. Cohen. And what was Ms. Page's reputation as an attorney and as a public servant?


so seems comey is more open to answering the democrats questions but still not going to reveal potentially classified info it is interesting to me at least that he SEEMS to imply that if info were to be unclassified it may make the attorney general (lynch?) look bad? and seems to be building sarzok up as a paragon of virtue with the FBI where as the Republican members seem some what skeptical about his integrity and potential biases but hey thats been politics for the last 6ish years



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: carewemust

thank you for the link, ill be giving it a read after im done with my copy paste mission as i dont want anything i havent read yet to color my opinion of the matter



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: carewemust
Here is an excellent summary/analysis of James Comey's testimony. John Solomon is one of the few REAL reporter-journalists who have closely followed and written what SPYGATE is all about.

Comey Testimony Analysis: thehill.com...

Even with all the question-avoidance, Comey did verify that the FBI was ILLEGALLY obtaining FISA Spy Warrants in 2016 and 2017.


Thanks for the article! Not only did Comey admit that the majority of the dossier had not been verified, he admitted that it still had gone unverified clear up until the time he was fired six months later! He KNEW it was crap!

Edit: The six months only extended into Comey's employment and not into Mueller's investigation.


edit on 8-12-2018 by Deetermined because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:52 PM
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top of 56- 60 of note they bring up seth rich and Comey seems to say even firing muller would not stop the investigation so that was some what interesting


Mr. Comey. Ms. Page was less well - known. She was a more junior attorney assigned to the deputy attorney -- excuse me, the deputy director, so I knew less about her. In my interactions with her, what I liked about her is she would be candid and blunt and often disruptive in a meeting, which I kind of liked. The FBI can be very hierarchal. She would tend to speak up even when, in a normal FBI meeting, it wasn't her turn, and I found that very helpful.

Mr. Cohen. The attacks that Mr. Trump has made on the FBI and the Justice Department, and particularly Mr. Strzok and Ms. Page and you and others, can you tell us how that's affected the morale of the FBI?

Mr. Comey. It's hard for me to give you a high - confidence answer because I'm not there any longer, so I'll give you my sense, which I think is right but I don't have high confidence in it, is that it has hurt morale in some senses, and in other senses, has redoubled the commitment of the people of the FBI to its mission and its apolitical nature. So I think it's actually a tale of two cities in that way.

Mr. Cohen. When you were at the FBI, did you have any reason to investigate the people who propagated stories that Seth Rich 57 was murdered by folks within the DNC or other democratic operatives or any of the people that talked about this pizza operation, the pizzagate thing? Did you ever investigate the people that started those conspiratorial stories?

Mr. Comey. I don't remember. I don't remember investigations on those topics. I remember at one point receiving an email from someone, a private citizen, to my personal account, raising issues about the -- is it Ping Pong? Whatever the pizza place was that was involved in some conspiracy theories. I remember sending it to my staff saying, make sure this gets to the appropriate place, but I don't know whether there were investigations.

Mr. Cohen. If Mr. Mueller were fired, how would that affect further investigations of crime that are ongoing now?
Mr. Comey. I don't know at this point. I don't know. And as an informed outsider, I think that it would -- you'd almost have to fire everyone in the FBI and the Justice Department to derail the relevant investigations, but I don't know exactly what the effect would be.

Mr. Cohen. Mr. Trump has said that the folks that work for him are 12 angry Democrats. Do you know those 12 or so people --
Mr. Comey. I don't.
Mr. Cohen. -- who they are?
Mr. Comey. I know by name some of them, and I think I've met some of them personally, but I don't know them well.
Mr. Cohen. Do you know if any of them are angry?
Mr. Comey. Not to my knowledge, but I'm sure they're like all normal humans; sometimes they're happy, sometimes they're sad, sometimes they're angry, but I can't comment on that characterization beyond that.
Mr. Cohen. All right. Despite the emails between Mr. Strzok and Ms. Page, was there anything you ever saw that you believe caused the FBI or the Justice Department, particularly the FBI, to not operate and investigate in an unbiased fashion?

Mr. Comey. No, I never saw -- and in those two people's cases -- I never saw any indication at all of bias by Mr. Strzok or Ms. Page. And, in fact, Peter Strzok helped draft my letter to Congress on October 28th that Hillary Clinton blames for her defeat. So it's hard f or me to see how he was on Team Clinton secretly at that point in time. And he also was one of the handful of people in the entire world who knew we were investigating four Americans who had some connection to Mr. Trump during the summer of 2016, and he didn't tell a soul. So it's hard to reconcile that with his being on Team Clinton. And so all of that is consistent with my view, I never saw any indication of anything but the facts and the law from those people.
Mr. Cohen. Thank you for your testimony . And thank you for your service to our country. I yield.
Mr. Nadler. Thank you.

Mr. Comey, I've been troubled by escalating attacks against the Department of Justice, the Special Counsel's Office, and the FBI, attacks against the independence of the institutions, the integrity of their employees, and the legitimacy of the Department of Justice and FBI investigations. As I'm sure you're aware, President Trump and his allies have repeatedly described Special Counsel Mueller and his investigation as illegitimate and politically biased. On November 27th, President Trump tweeted in reference to the special counsel, quote: The fake news media builds Bob Mueller up as a saint, when in actuality, he's the exact opposite. He is doing tremendous damage to our criminal justice system where he's only looking at one side and not the other. Heroes will come of this and it won't be Mueller and his terrible gang of angry Democrats. Look at their past and look where they come from. And now a $30 million witch hunt continues and they have got nothing but ruined lives. Where is the server? Let these terrible people go back to the Clinton Foundation and Justice Department, close quote. On December 3rd, President Trump tweeted, quote: Bob Mueller, who is a much different man than people think, and his out - of - control band of angry Democrats don't want the truth, they only want lies. The truth is very bad for their mission, close quote. I'll note that Robert Mueller is well - known to be a lifelong Republican. Now, generally speaking, does being identified as a Democrat mean a prosecutor would be too conflicted to conduct a fair investigation of a Republican or vice versa?
Mr. Comey. No, it does not.


so some interesting things here where you can see how divided we have become and a good long anti trump portion but it is their interpretation of things so is what it is ,its my opinion that comey seems at least in the text much more comfortable answering democratic questions as his answers are much longer on average then to the republican questions



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen


Mr. Comey. I did not see anything that led me to conclude that Loretta Lynch was acting inappropriately in supervising the Department of Justice in that investigation. The appearance of conflict or the appearance that she was compromised in some fashion was what drove me to separate myself from her in July.


Uh, is it just me, but those two statements appear to contradict each other.



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 08:59 PM
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a reply to: Deetermined

Here is what judge Andrew Napolitano says:


Fox News senior judicial analyst Judge Andrew Napolitano on Monday said the FBI offered former British spy Christopher Steele $50,000 if he could “corroborate” the Trump-Russia dossier.

“I believe, just from examining the public sources, that the FBI offered Christopher Steele $50,000 if he could corroborate the dossier. He either couldn’t, didn’t, wouldn’t, and they didn’t pay him the money,” Napolitano told FOX Business' Stuart Varney on “Varney & Co.”
Source: www.foxbusiness.com...

After this statement, and after declaring that British Intel agency GCHQ helped our FBI spy on the Trump campaign, Napolitano was forced to the dark side. Probably by threats to his family from Intel agencies. He hasn't uttered a negative word about Mueller, FBI, GCHQ, M16, etc.. since December 2017.



posted on Dec, 8 2018 @ 09:00 PM
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originally posted by: Deetermined
a reply to: xuenchen


Mr. Comey. I did not see anything that led me to conclude that Loretta Lynch was acting inappropriately in supervising the Department of Justice in that investigation. The appearance of conflict or the appearance that she was compromised in some fashion was what drove me to separate myself from her in July.


Uh, is it just me, but those two statements appear to contradict each other.




Shurrr Does.

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