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Australian Secret Base??

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posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 12:47 AM
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Hey Guys,

I happen to know of an australian base which seems a little bit funny. In Jervis Bay there is quite a bit of naval activity as it is teh officers trainining academy at HMAS Creswell. Being a fairly new resident i've noticed some weird goings on.

HMAS Creswell is on the water but accross near the tip of the bay in the national park is a HUGE airbase. It is really well looked after and the front gate says it is `JERVIS BAY RANGE FACILITIES' and says it is a navy establishment. Yet when i checked online the navy have it listed as decommisioned and supposedly handed off to the airforce.

Now the base itself (from the little you can see) has 2 runways, a smaller one and a really really big one and by big i mean wide. It is designed to be shielded from your eyes by the trees and scrub planted around the outside fence. You can see the tyre tracks on the inside of the fence where security drives around the gates. Also austalian federal police routinely drive around teh roads etc.

Now in jervis bay you dont often see military personnel as strange as that is. But recently there have been a heap of defence department personnel and contracting companys staying in the area. companies like ratheon, lockheed martin, BAE etc.

I ran into some work guys who were supposedly cabling at HMAS CRESWELL, they said they were laying around 250km of cable. But there were only 2 of them and they said they had laid 13 km just that day. So obviously they have to be laying the cable inside buildings and the tweird thing was they wore pristine white overalls (ive never seen workmen wear white very often).The thing is there are not enough buildings in that area on either base to lay that amount of cable, so it must have a pretty big underground facility.

Anyway its really weird and coupled with the fact that there are only ever landings at like 1am in the morning that you hear coming in and they next day you never see any aircraft but you see the jet fuel tankers driving back from the base with A1 - jet fuel written on the side. Also the fact the constant chopper activity going back and forth from the airbase.

REally weird for an officer training academy.




posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 01:03 AM
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this sounds like some area 51 stuff



posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 01:29 AM
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does it surprize you every country prolly has one or 5,000 lol
with good reason we're in a tech race agaisnt each other or not but we have advanced reasearch going on in these bases

dont not surprize me at all



posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 01:53 AM
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Hmm...sounds interesting...

I just took a poke around to see how far away it is from me and I came across this map which shows the Jervis Bay Range Facility (it's dead on in the middle, you can't miss it)

You can see it has the 2 long runways which intercept each other.

It's also interesting how much land the Depart of Defence owns (all the purple bits)



posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 02:03 AM
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Hmm...bit more...

To find the article go there, and search for the word "Kalkara"
From here




A total of 33 flights have now been conducted. The Kalkara system is now operating from the Jervis Bay Range Facility on the East Coast and from HMAS Stirling (Garden Island, Western Australia) and in time will also conduct operations from other locations within Australia as required by Navy and Air Force units.


So it's being/has been used for launching unmanned planes used for target practice, basically.

But the things that allstargold described cant be happening just for target practice...



posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 04:03 AM
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I asked one of the defence department guys in the pub tonight what goes on down there. He just said we fly drones out to look at shipping etc and not to ask too many questions.

But I know for a fact they regularly book the local motels out for DOD scientists and staff to stay at. I also see large sea king helicopters coming and going at least 2-3 times a day. There is also a huge weird looking radar system up on the bluff overlooing the base. It sort of looks like lots of big tent poles in the ground with wire coming of it and they seem to be in a big line.

Whatever is going on over there it's definately not drones (or at least only drones). Also the real interesting thing is that whole area on the map is listed as Australian Capital Territory (ACT) right in the middle of new south wales. It was weird just crossing a border like that lol.



posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 04:22 AM
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hmm...there is definetly something going on up there.

Been doing a little more digging, apart from drones they also have a "Telemetry Data Acquisition Facility"

Go here and scroll down to page 21 and 22 and you'll find the info about it.

I've also found that there is a "Shallow Water Sound Range" (thats on page 23 and 24 from the above document) but i dont think you'd be able to see that as it's underwater.

Something still seems fishy...telementry? lots of DoD people? hmm...

[edit on 26/2/05 by TK868]



posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 05:09 AM
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now this may sound like im being overly sceptical, but do any of you actually operate or have operated a drone aircraft? do you know what sort of radar setup is requied? do you know haw much maitenance has to be done on it? what sort of reasearch and development people might come to see thier project in action?

these are very expensive air craft, remotely contolled and i dont know what kind of radio and radar they need to keep them in control but i bet theyed be sparing no expense in keeping it in the air. now i dont work on these air craft but i am doin an aerospace engineering course and one of our teachers has done work on these drones. basically what im trying to say is that this stuff might actually be nessesary to operate it


[edit on 26-2-2005 by tiddly54]



posted on Feb, 26 2005 @ 05:11 AM
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Also, TV reception gets real crappy and fuzzy sometimes and cell phone reception comes and goes in the area. Its nothing really overt which has alerted me just lots of little things.



posted on Feb, 27 2005 @ 12:45 AM
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Originally posted by allstargold
Also, TV reception gets real crappy and fuzzy sometimes and cell phone reception comes and goes in the area. Its nothing really overt which has alerted me just lots of little things.


Hmm...I guess that could be from the Telemetry Station sending/receiving signals.


Originally posted by tiddly54
now this may sound like im being overly sceptical, but do any of you actually operate or have operated a drone aircraft? do you know what sort of radar setup is requied? do you know haw much maitenance has to be done on it? what sort of reasearch and development people might come to see thier project in action?

these are very expensive air craft, remotely contolled and i dont know what kind of radio and radar they need to keep them in control but i bet theyed be sparing no expense in keeping it in the air. now i dont work on these air craft but i am doin an aerospace engineering course and one of our teachers has done work on these drones. basically what im trying to say is that this stuff might actually be nessesary to operate it


I have no doubt that they are hard to maintain, etc. But why are the DoD booking motels for scientists/staff? Surely they would have all the staff they need living in Jervis Bay, it wouldn't be viable for the DoD to just bring in people whenever a problem arises.



posted on Feb, 27 2005 @ 06:48 AM
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smell somthin iffy me its the gov bound to be naughty



posted on Mar, 2 2005 @ 12:41 AM
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a lot of defence stuff now days is contracted out to privet companies. prehaps these companies operate out of a location not near jervis bay?
maybe research is done in one area, engineering in another, fabrication in yet another location, and then assembled some where and finally tested and flow out from jevis bay? representitives from each stage would have to counsul with each other some time, why not do it while having a look at how some prototypes are operating? and how can u say it isnt viable? whats not viable about it? do u have any idea how long it takes an aircraft to get from drawing board to the air? and how much it costs? flying ppl in once and a while, or even fairly regually isnt goin to put a dent in their budjet, especially if they factor in these costs when the plan the project



posted on Nov, 14 2010 @ 11:59 PM
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I used to live inside the ACT adminstrative area of Jervis Bay. First. Jervis Bay is also an active Naval Training area, and even I in my time saw the odd missle flare in the sky. Also the Royal New Zealand Airforce often 'hops' over the ditch to train in both anti shipping strikes and practicing coastal penetrations. So there is a reason for a large number of facilities, that at sometimes appear to be run on a skeleton staff, but then the place fills up during exercises.

Because 'technically' Jervis Bay is 'adminstratively' part of the A.C.T. its operates under Federal Commonwealth Law, making it easier to shut down the place during live fire exercises and apply various Federal Commonwealth laws during exercises.

The airfields you describe, well 'they' are large and small, but for a reason. Once upon a time in a galaxy far far away the Royal Australian Navy had a carrier fleet, the carriers home port was Sydney whereas the naval Aviation Station for the Naval Air Wings is HMAS Albatross to the North of Jervis Bay at Nowra.

Aircraft woukld be 'flown off' the carriers to their Naval Station at Albatross and the Carriers would berth in Sydney, and vicea versa when the carriers left Sydney, the air wings would 'fly in/on board'.

Now. Australia only really ever had a 2 carrier fleet (at one time it was 3 borrowing a UK carrier HMS Ocean), and in the end it was reduced to 1 carrier HMAS Melbourne which was upgraded with an angled deck, steam catapaults, mirror landing aids, whereas the old HMAS Sydney Carrier was not converted for jet operations but became a fast troop transport (also known as the Vung Tau Ferry for its troop, vehicle and equipment runs to Vietnam)

a 1 carrier fleet was useless for 'training' and having a 'deployment ability'.

The British Pacific Carrier Fleet was going to home port out of Jervis Bay before the atom bomb removed the need to 'invade' Japan, and 'satellite fields were build for the British carriers aircraft.

I dont know if any of you guys have ever seen the size of HMAS Melbourne our 'carrier'... it was a baby... with a deck the size of a postage stamp. and I mean small fellas, these Fleet Air Arm pilots had some balls. Especially the S-2 Tracker pilots (a twin engine anti submarine plane) there was literally metres to spare for the wing tips. As the Skyhawk pilots, again, all balls, as this carrier was a World War 2 design for aircraft operating much slower and with less weight.

So to qualify, 'a fake aircraft carrier deck' the size of Melbournes was painted out on the large runway you mention for them to get used to one hell of a landing and give them some room for 'mistakes'.

Now it is 3 years since I left Jervis Bay (I've returned 'home to far North Queensland), but last I knew, and I know it to be true, as Australia no longer has any fixed wing naval aircraft (just helicopters) both Albatross and the sateliite dispersal and training runways are a bit redundant... ... except for the Austramy Army parachute school also uses HMAS Albatross. I regularly used to see a single Air Force Caribou on the runways you mention doing 'small stick load' training, also contained in that base is the Navy's survival school.

As far as I'm concerned there is no 'Area 51' type stuff going on... Its too open and accessable. Its just a well maintained and adminstered area.



posted on Nov, 15 2010 @ 12:21 AM
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Oh and another thing, Jervis Bay was the original site chosen for placing an Australian Nuclear Reactor, down near Green Patch, you can still see the cuttings done to clear the site. Its choice again being that it was withing a Commonwealth Federal Government administered area, which avoided any complications with State Governments objecting and gave access to the wider bay for coolant water. But then we went 'anti nuclear' as government policy and it was 'shelved'.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 15 2010 @ 12:38 AM
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Not really a secret base
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 15 2010 @ 05:11 AM
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Is this the base?
CLICK
I was looking around Jervis Bay Territory and stumbled across it.

I couldn't find a single aircraft or anything, not even any tire tracks on the runways.

Strangely enough there is a dirt track leading from one of the runways all the way to an a small community called Wreck Bay Village.
en.wikipedia.org...
There's 215 people living there. I count roughly 45 houses so it's certainly a small place to live. According to wiki they are mostly Aboriginals. Can you verify this OP?

If you click this link you will see where the road to the runway starts at.
CLICK
Zoom out and you can see the 215 person community on the left.

Okay so keep following the unmarked road and you will reach the runway.
CLICK

There doesn't appear to be ANY fences to stop people from driving from their homes to the base. Are they really just Aboriginals living there, or are they military personel? Please verify this OP.

I'm going to look around the area to see if I can find any signs of satellite dishes or other defensive security objects, or anything that looks out of place or camouflaged.
edit on 15/11/10 by Nventual because: fixed the links. third time now. i really hope they work this time.



posted on Nov, 15 2010 @ 06:32 AM
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Okay there are a few vantage points where you can see the runway from a public road.

Before I get to that here is the entrance to the base.
CLICK

Okay now here is one vantage point where you can clearly see the runway..
Here is one, looking straight ahead at the runway

This is a clear shot of the 2nd runway.
Click

There's some other spots but until somebody posts and says they're interested I'm keeping them to myself.


OP get to these spots with binoculars and pull over to the side of the road. If you're there for less than a minute you won't even be noticed.

edit: I think that guy above is right about it being too open and public to have anything secret going on. According to wikipedia there are some public flights that land at the airport, although I haven't been able to verify it.
edit on 15/11/10 by Nventual because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2010 @ 10:34 PM
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reading your comments. I litterally grew up in this part of the world, in the context that a lot of my initial bushwalking was done in this part of the world and further inland. No need for you to pore over staellite images, ask away. Not just that have a personal attachment to the place as my mother and father met 'there'. He was doing a parachute course in the Army, as I mentioned it is also the Australian Army parachute training school up at Nowra at HMAS Albatross, my mother was a suicidal sports skydiver in the sixties using world war 2 surplus chutes. She was also a nurse. Because of all the surplus satellite fields from World War 2, often the sports sky divers used the same drop zones as the military. By happenstance my mother had done her drop, and the army came in to drop a load on their DZ. My old man is a big fella, six foot six and 21 stone when in in his 'prime'. He was coming down hard and fast (so my mum tells me) don't know if you know or have seen military jumpers, you have your main chute on your back, reserve on your front, strapped to your leg (with supposedly quick release straps) your kit in a duffle bag, and your rifle strapped to other leg. After you get chute deployment you are meant to 'get to work'. Unstrap the rifle and lay it across your reserve chute and then unstrap the duffle bag which then drops below you on your toggle rope 20 feet below you. When the duffle bag hits the ground, the chute 'luffs', breathes a bit, and cushions your impact from all the combat kit. Alas my old man was not able to get his duffle bag off in time for the landing. End result, fractured his leg in 18 places.... ... ...

My mum watched and came running, as a nurse (and so she says was not going to let this fine specimen of Australian manhood out of her sight!) said the first thing she ever heard my father say was "Fu



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