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2nd sun

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posted on Feb, 27 2005 @ 12:48 AM
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Cool, got a lot of responses. I found one link of what I was talking about.

www.zetatalk.com...

Was there a link on this site about it? I thought there may have been more pictures.

Thanks,

Troy



E_T

posted on Feb, 27 2005 @ 01:41 AM
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Originally posted by XPhiles
Yeah but this particular filament is different from normal ones ?
How it is so different?
Sunspots have been "often" visible over month and all these are caused by "knots" in magnetic field which makes them linked to each other.



Originally posted by cybertroy
Cool, got a lot of responses. I found one link of what I was talking about.
www.zetatalk.com...
ATS isn't meant to be used as garbage dump, BTS is for that.

www.badastronomy.com...



posted on Feb, 27 2005 @ 05:10 PM
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E_T


Originally posted by E_T
How it is so different?
Sunspots have been "often" visible over month and all these are caused by "knots" in magnetic field which makes them linked to each other.



While filaments are fairly common, this one is longer than most that we have seen. It will be interesting to see how they appear as the Sun's rotation brings them over the edge of the Sun beginning around Feb. 25. The filament is particularly well visible in this H-alpha image obtained at the Kanzelhoehe Solar Observatory. sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov...


Sunspot activity on the sun is not constant and varies on short times scales (day to day). Seeing as this one is still there and that it being longer than the usual, I would say it is different.



posted on Feb, 27 2005 @ 08:00 PM
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If we really want to make a second sun then why dont we make Jupiter and Saturn crash into each other. That ought to do something



posted on Feb, 27 2005 @ 10:50 PM
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Garbage dump, not what I was trying to do. I just wanted to see if there was any truth to such a claim, and if there were any witnesses to such a thing.

Troy



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 12:17 AM
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Originally posted by Croat56
If we really want to make a second sun then why dont we make Jupiter and Saturn crash into each other. That ought to do something


Now I know that can not be done moving a whole planet but it is a funny thought
maybe this sounds a bit more realistic send some huge vacum type spaceships and have em suck up all the gases they can and import them to the host gas planet.

But what would that accomplish?



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 04:22 AM
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Originally posted by Terapin

There is no second sun hiding in orbit behind our sun. The gravity from the second sun would totaly change all the orbits of every planet and we could detect it even if we couldnt see it. We have detected celestial bodies from their gravity 'signature' before and it would be quite obvious if there were a second sun. So far we have not found any dual star systems that have planets. All binary stars have such a wild gravity well that planet formation seems impossible in such a system.



1) You say "there is no second sun hiding (...) behind our sun". This is an idea suggested by one of the assistants at the séance, not by the entity or entities replying.

2) Then you say that "the gravity from the second sun would totally change all the [planetary] orbits (...) and we would detect it even if we couldn't see it. (...) it would be quite obvious if there were a second sun." You're supposing here that the second sun is close enough for that.

3) Finally you claim that "all binary stars have such a wild gravity well that planet formation seems impossible in such a system". Not so, according to Stephen H. Dole in a book titled Habitable Planets For Man, which was meant to be part of a research program undertaken by the Rand Corp., the well-known think-tank, on behalf of the U.S. Air Force.

On Ch. 4 he explains that "if the planet [belongs to a] binary-star system, the two stars must be either very close together or very far apart, so that they will not interfere with the stability of the planetary orbit (...)".

Maybe you read some older book, like Allan Broms's Our Emerging Universe (1961). On page 102 of the Dell paperback edition this is what it says: "If the component swirls [of the 'presolar nebula'] are not too different in size, double or multiple stars may result, each condensation then being large enough to generate its own heat and light as a star. In such cases, any lesser condensation of planetary proportions would likely be absorbed, broken up, or cast off, as any planet orbit relative to two or more large shifting centers of gravitation would certainly be erratic and eventually probably catastrophic in one way or another. But with lesser and merely preplanetary swirls, the single dominating central Sun permits planets to form and survive in individual, regular, and permanent orbits. From which we may conclude that double or multiple stars cannot have planet systems, as they would simply perturb them out of existence."

Both authors happen to be engineers, but Dole is/was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, so maybe this would tend to make his arguments more reliable regarding such matters?




[edit on 28-2-2005 by Macrento]



posted on Feb, 28 2005 @ 05:55 AM
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invader_chris--

Thank you for searching for that thread on the so-called Lucifer Project. If it hadn't been for you, I'd never have known that such a thread existed.

The creator of the thread gives a chronological sequence of events, including this one: "2003 – NASA scientists decide to plunge Galileo into Jupiter after claiming there is no other logical option after initially implying that the craft would be sent to deep space, crashed into a moon, or left in orbit."

However, nobody there mentions the reason NASA had for destroying the Galileo probe by making it crash into Jupiter, the reason why it was the only "logical option" : "To eliminate any potential that the spacecraft could someday contaminate Europa [the Jovian moon, where there might be life forms that would be affected by the arrival of terrestrial microorganisms], Galileo will be directed into Jupiter's atmosphere (...)." ("Sky & Telescope", March/02, p. 28)

There might be, after all, a scheming minority owning and controlling everything, and controlled by wicked aliens, but those who, like Cooper, would make us believe in funny ideas like the Lucifer Project, are aiding the Enemy by making it seem like everybody that warns about a true conspiracy are insane.



posted on Mar, 1 2005 @ 07:41 PM
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What are you guys doing?? all the pictures of the sun you've guys have posted are all photoshopped or just completely faked. Heres the real picture:




[edit on 1/3/2005 by Schmidt1989]

[edit on 1/3/2005 by Schmidt1989]



posted on Mar, 1 2005 @ 07:55 PM
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macrento says:

"Both authors happen to be engineers, but Dole is/was a member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, so maybe this would tend to make his arguments more reliable regarding such matters?'

Big deal. I'm an engineer at Boeing, and I'm a member of AIAA, too. You make that sound like it's some sort of holy annointing LOL!!

And if there were a second sun that was so far away that its G would be negligible, we'd still be able to see it.

There isn't any second sun, and even if we could crash Jupiter and Saturn together, which we can't, it still wouldn't be enough to make another sunstart uu. The mass simply isn't there.

But macrento, your posting makes a lot of good common sense. I appreciate seeing you here!

[edit on 1-3-2005 by Off_The_Street]



posted on Mar, 1 2005 @ 08:01 PM
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Schmidt says:

"In a desert, searching for Vertu's money..."

Is that the same "vertu" as in

"...and vertu with hir sweete breeth / inspired hath in every holt and heeth..."?

Also are you, perchance, in the Sonoran Desert?



posted on Mar, 1 2005 @ 08:12 PM
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i mean vertu as in the ATS member, his signature says ive buried a hundre million dollars in the united states. so im looking for it, lol. and the sonoran desert? sure whatever floats your boat, is that you with the gun in ur avatar and are you in that desert?



posted on Mar, 2 2005 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by Off_The_Street


And if there were a second sun that was so far away that its G would be negligible, we'd still be able to see it.





Not if it's a "spent" star, a star that has run out of "fuel" and is no longer burning anything. Such an object will be able to sneak up on us and will be visible only when it is close enough for our own sunlight to reveal its presence. As they say in the dialogue I pasted here, how visible can a brown object be on a black background, no matter how big it may be?



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