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Last years Marine C130 crash

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posted on Dec, 5 2018 @ 08:54 PM
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Reports out and doesnt paint a pretty picture..
C130 crash




posted on Dec, 5 2018 @ 09:38 PM
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How about some content?? What happened? What’s your thoughts on it? Just a link ?



posted on Dec, 5 2018 @ 10:17 PM
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Perhaps put a little more than the bare minimum of effort and more than 45 seconds of time to formulate your OP, quoting the article would be a good start.




The horrific KC-130T plane crash that killed 15 Marines and a sailor last summer was caused by a deteriorating propeller blade that was corroded when it entered an Air Force maintenance depot in 2011, but workers there failed to fix it and sent it back to the fleet unrepaired. This neglect allowed a routine corrosion problem to metastasize into a crack that went undetected for years until a mundane cross-country transport mission ended in flames. On July 10, 2017, that worn-down blade finally failed and came loose from the propeller 20,000 feet above Mississippi farmland, as the Marine Corps Reserve plane was en route to California under the call sign “Yanky 72.” It shot into the side of the aging aircraft, one of the last 130Ts still flying, a model set to be retired in the next few years.


Sadly with the sustained high operational tempo and past cuts in funding I fear that the accident rate is far from peaking and will continue to rise. You’d think that more attention would be paid to prop condition.



posted on Dec, 5 2018 @ 10:30 PM
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a reply to: BigDave-AR

We used to get aircraft back from the Depot and put them straight into Phase so we could fix all the things they screwed to hell and back.



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I have seen similar problems in the civil airliner world. We have got back aircraft that were sent for heavy C or D checks to so called reputable MRO's in SE Asia and immediately set about checking things that dont seem right or we suspected were just penned off as having been inspected/done. Worst part is it makes you look expensive and we get branded as obstinate, gold plating trouble makers. Worse is nobody wants to know the truth because its "so cheap!", so they dont even send people along anymore to oversee, you cant report what you cannot see. I bet the same is happening with US DoD maintenance as well.



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 03:00 AM
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Sorry was just lost for words and felt a bit ill from reading the report..As a former airframe guy it was drilled into us to follow procedure and make sure every job we did was 100% plus was properly recorded..The rest of the guys in the shop were the same.The company had a name to stand by and the guys on the floor made sure we all followed on from each other.To have a workshop do what they did is criminal and should be treated as a sickness.Im not sure if its peer pressure or just laziness.It should not have happened.



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 03:12 AM
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a reply to: thebozeian

We lost a -135 during a ramp pressurization test because one of the guys doing the test was using a home made pressurization gauge. He missed the fact that it had already gone around once and kept going up on pressure to reach what he thought was the proper levels. They found bits of fuselage a quarter mile away.

I've lost count of how many times fuel cell left caps in the tanks and cost an airframe that way. It's all about costs and time.



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 03:38 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Seen the pics of that somewhere.Wasnt pretty..



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 03:58 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
You may be happy to know that particular incident is required reading in human factors training down here. We all know the story of how a guy thought he was doing the right thing by making a home made gauge as a workaround and it ended in a hull loss. It points towards a management cultural problem ultimately.



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: thebozeian

It should be called Depot culture. That was almost SOP for years. We'd find tools, bits missing, wiring done wrong, hell even had one with crooked wings.



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 08:58 PM
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Word of warning, the animation is not easy to watch.

Animation and report.
edit on 12/6/2018 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2018 @ 09:55 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
Word of warning, the animation is not easy to watch.

Animation and report.

That’s a bit of an understatement



posted on Dec, 7 2018 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Oh I have found stuff in 5-10 year old 737's that was very obviously left there on the production line like standoff harness brackets in the forward avionics bay.. And I have known people that have found tools like dolly's and rivet guns left over from manufacture. But to have the whole system civilian or military get to the point of putting bad blades back onto an aircraft for years before failure. I dont know what the answer is to this.

You were right it was hard to watch the animation.




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