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Let's talk about survival...REAL survival, no zombies...well, maybe some zombies

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posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: Nickn3

Exactly!

Most people cannot understand this.




posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Bitte



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:18 PM
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My greatest worry would be about the nuclear power plants being manned until they can be shut down. But if possible, I'd head north. Most people are afraid of what it would take to survive in the north country. I remember as a kid, during the winter we'd hunt rabbits with a long 2x2 board. Now that's survival.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:21 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

I am not trying to upset you, I'm really not, but I fear you don't understand.

One day, you will see the light, and there won't be anyone else....only you. It's a scary feeling at first.

Everything you thought would be...won't. Everyone you thought you would be there...won't. And, you'll be alone.

And then you will see.

And, you will look around yourself and revel in it, or you will run from it. It's just the way it is.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:23 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

The whole plan is self sustained based on me?
Even piloting the boat/abandoned submarine...



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

Yes.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:25 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

And I am not upset by discussion based on logic



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

Good.

You understand now.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

Good.

You understand now.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:34 PM
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You are probably better off the more remote from city folk you are. Being urban would be the worst scenario. I live on an island. There are plenty of people here, but the roving gangs of tough guys don't live here and would have a hard time getting here. If it happened during a weekday that would cut the population down quite a bit as the commuters would be off island, which would be useful. Still, cooperation would be essential in the long run. Health could be a big issue. Might have to raid a pharmacy. I'm guessing that would be a prime target. Might be good to have a stash of something to barter. Beer would be good, though it doesn't last long. What else? Ammo? Whiskey?



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:40 PM
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edit on 12/2/2018 by r0xor because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:57 PM
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We have a kitchen wood cookstove that will heat our house and a well, which can supply us with water even without power with some modification since the level of the water is higher than our basement it will feed into the house to access. We have supplies to last about three months to feed the extended family, and we have three generators to keep the freezers cold. In the winter the freezers can go into the garage or shed and stay ice cold here. I know how to grow things and have the tools to do so, we have seeds for the year in advance and I keep some potatoes to use as seed for the next year.

But, if things get ugly, we have enough money to go where a disaster isn't. No debt either.

You can't count on the deer for food, in this area all the deer would be eaten in less than three months, lots of people hunt around here. We have ample fish in the lakes and streams, it is possible to survive here.

Mentally I am not prepared, It would suck to live without power, the wife would drive me nuts without her facebook to keep her preoccupied.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 09:01 PM
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a reply to: r0xor




posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Survival.... now you are on my topic.

This should be of major interest -

Raiders, Marauders, And You - Things To Be Aware Of Before SHTF (Especially Mormons)
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

Great thread!!



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 09:29 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: Allaroundyou

I can't help but think that those who react quickly and start trying to improve their situation right away will in the end, do the best. Those who join together in groups will fare better than those who do not.


Agreed, I know my neighbors very well but only in a serious situation would we work together. Till then we all bunker in and use what can to communicate.
I will say I am lucky to have such good neighbors. But the biggest drawback would be if I had to help with food. Honestly I lack in that area and kids always come first. So that would suck for me at least.
Last minute thought here..... I have a poop ton of oatmeal so that’s good I guess. Oatmeal and coffee mixed is amazing



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 09:49 PM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou

Stuff like oatmeal, rice, beans and all manner of other things are like paradise when you are in survival mode.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

My experience with a widespread disaster is limited to an ice storm in '09 that knocked out power to an entire region. For us it was just a couple of weeks before it was restored but many in the area were without power for up to a month. Unlike your scenario, we had a landline when cell towers went out so we had access to internet. In addition we were warned of the impending disaster for three days before it hit us.

Our disaster plan began when I was designing our house. I made sure that we had adequate space to have a store of supplies set aside like my parents had done. Since our biggest expected natural disaster is an earthquake (New Madrid fault) we made sure that our house was built to Alaska's standards since Kentucky officials looked at me as if I'd gone round the bend when I told them I wanted the house to be able to withstand a major quake. (I had a contractor friend who lived and worked in Alaska at the time so was able to get his expertise.)

Before the storm hit we did extra shopping and we did a lot of cooking. I had designed the fireplace grate with a pot hook and a pot ring and had lots of cast iron spiders, Dutch ovens, skillets and such. We had two freezers full of food, one of them full of a cow from a farmer just down the road. When we put that kind of cash into food my husband thought it best that we protect that investment with a whole house generator. In November of '08 he did some research and found what we needed and the generator was installed. There were plenty of our friends and family members who thought we'd gone just a tad paranoid to spend that kind of money on a "what if" situation.

When the power went out we were fine and we had a refrigerator full of food that only needed to be warmed by the fire. We closed off the back portion of the house and were able to stay comfortable with only heat from the fireplace. We ran the generator a couple of times a day to keep the freezers from thawing and to let folks get a hot shower from time to time.

Our community is rural, not out in the boonies rural but a farming community. We know each other and we are used to helping each other. We know the first responders and they were the ones we made sure to contact and let them know that if they were in the area they were welcome to come by for a hot cup and a meal. They knew who else needed help so our net grew.

People who didn't have generators brought food to be cooked. We feasted and shared with the older folks in the neighborhood who didn't want to leave their homes to go to a shelter. We charged the batteries in a neighbor's emergency oxygen supply.

From this experience we were able to refine our plans a bit. One of the shortcomings of my original plan was that I hadn't stored nearly enough coffee to share it with the world. I used about 4 months worth of coffee in that two weeks. I had based the coffee on my normal usage alone since my husband didn't drink muddy water.

We never got around to digging into the "survival food" because people kept bringing food to be cooked from their freezers. Our "survival" supplies as such, dried beans, rice and "add water" foods never got touched.

Funny you should bring this up just now. I was at the shooting range recently and one of the deputies who enjoyed our hospitality asked me if my house would become a coffee house again when the next ice storm hits. It was a reminder to me to check my supplies as there were mutterings about the possibility of one coming our way. I'm a little old lady who can do quite well in the kitchen to keep folks fed. I was taught that reaching out to help others when possible is a virtue.

I knew the people who were responding to the disaster because I sat on committees who plan for these events and run drills several times a year. I would suggest that if one is serious about being prepared they should seek out their local disaster preparedness teams. In working with them you will learn a lot, including how your local system is likely to work during the actual event. You will also learn abut the weaknesses of the plan and be able to make your own plan better by knowing the likelihood of what will work and what won't.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 10:14 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

while water pressure holds - fill all availiable containers - then go to bed

in morning - get up @ dawn - and if weather ok - go for a walk [ i am not getting wet // covered in snow without VERY good reason ] - just to see whats the feel of town

on return home - assess house security and stock // charge of all batteries i has

make a cold brekke from fridge - and plan how to eat all fridge // freezer contents before they spoil

then sit back in the corner - with some good books - and just listen to the neighbourhood

listen to radio [ with headphones ] - for govt announce - and factor that in

first few days - i want minimal visibility -

i would go get wood [ copse availiable 250m from house ] - and BBQ meat from freezer in my front garden [ everyone expects me to have 2 pork chops in the freezer
]

but no displays of obvious survival kit // plan // readiness

any longer term plans would be reactive to whats actually happening

quite boring ccompared to the rambo-esque fantasies some merkins have - but hey



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 10:22 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: seeker1963

Great answer! I think society will sink into depravity and chaos far sooner than most think!





I think that depends on where you live and how much community you actually have. Urban dwellers in apartments will be the worst places to be, no community, no resources and lots of people. It gets better as you get out to the country. Many rural places still have the same families from 4 generations ago and they will get by most likely.

I do wonder how long people will wait for the government to come rescue them ? After Katrina it was after 3 -4 days most despaired and rightly so. If they can't get help to urban areas what are the odds they can relieve rural areas ?

The cities might well be worth bugging out of if you have a landing place and a fallback. People would be everywhere if the SHTF - all the hunters will be out in the woods looking for the last deer or turkey before someone else gets it. The roads won't be safe nor will cutting through private property. Bugging out will be a last resort for most.

Having enough so you don't have to leave for 10 -14 days I would consider reasonably prepared. Past that food becomes the issue and you need a plan for that. If you can't forage you will be screwed unless you own a farm. Wild game and fish will become scarce fast and increasingly dangerous to pursue. Those who can find food anywhere they walk have a huge advantage.



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