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Let's talk about survival...REAL survival, no zombies...well, maybe some zombies

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posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963

We're so far out in the sticks it's almost automatic.

For us, something like this would be just another day, hence my posting this thread to begin with.

Tonight, the wife and I tried something we'd never tried before...B&M Brown Bread (in a can). It was actually pretty good. Had a 4 year expiration date on it. I lived in AK for a while and I never knew about that stuff, but wish I did. It would have been nice.

I didn't know it at first, but i've lived a few places where I really was in a survival situation (SE Asia among those). In the moment it didn't really strike me, but afterwards it did.

I remember being up in a friend's house up in Barrow once. He had tinfoil on all the windows, and the place was a tiny "hut" (smaller than a motel room). He had like (5) electric heaters in the room, and we sat there and drank a bit of whiskey. It was -35F outside and completely dark at noon!

You had to learn to survive in a place like that, and it wasn't pretty. Every day was the end of the World if you weren't prepared. But you came back to a place so humble, so simple, and that's just what you did. There was NOTHING else to do there.

And, you survived. You went to work, you came home (to nothing), and you did it again. You survived!




posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:59 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963

Some are prepared ... to use the one tool that escapes most.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963

I was stocking up some years back ( well, probable over ten years by now), every time I did the weekly shop I'd buy and extra carrier bag of tinned foods and a crate of 2l. bottles of water, I had a good few months of food for us, then the company I was working for went under.

We ended up having to eat the food in the end, so even though it wasn't a total SHTF, it served its purpose in that it was used in an emergency.

I should really get back on it, we could probably only last a month or so on what we have in at the moment, scary thought really.




posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: MerkabaTribeEntity
a reply to: seeker1963

I was stocking up some years back ( well, probable over ten years by now), every time I did the weekly shop I'd buy and extra carrier bag of tinned foods and a crate of 2l. bottles of water, I had a good few months of food for us, then the company I was working for went under.

We ended up having to eat the food in the end, so even though it wasn't a total SHTF, it served its purpose in that it was used in an emergency.

I should really get back on it, we could probably only last a month or so on what we have in at the moment, scary thought really.




Not fun nor comforting to think about it even if you are moderately prepared. But I do believe with the what we are witnessing with our world leaders, thinking of the nightmares to come is better than thinking they will not happen.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:14 PM
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Up in Barrow, the prices rose and fell based on what the aircraft could bring in, and the weather.

Never saw a stranger economy. When the dense fog would roll in of shore the 737's couldn't land, and it the Dash 8's would come in (those guys are crazy and can land anywhere!). Sometimes weeks would go by.

The "grocery" store was stripped of most everything, and toilet paper was $13 for (4) rolls.

It's a weird life, so far away from home. For so long.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:14 PM
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Local culture certainly makes a difference as we found out quickly after Fridays earthquake. No looting, no real problems, just people taking care of one another. Somehow I can't see it being the same in cities in many other areas. Anchorage is back up and running and in no time at all.

As far as survival in a much worse scenario where utilities and supply lines are gone for a long period of time, I believe the most valuable commodity will be knowledge. A supply of goods hidden away is of limited value if you can't replace it as you use it.

The last place I'd want to be is anywhere near the major cities. More competition for less resources is not a winning combination, not to mention the bottom of the barrel of society tends to gravitate towards and live in the largest cities.

Cities survival is only possible if supported by rural farms and ranches.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I went through something when I was younger. We had an ice storm and were basically trapped in our house for over two weeks.

We were just fine, but many were in a dire situation.
Many people left home to go look for goods, some of those people died.
The radio said if you were on the roads you could be arrested.

You know the funny thing that will get most people is boredom!

edit on 2-12-2018 by JAGStorm because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:18 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

I went through something when I was younger. We had an ice store are were basically trapped in our house for over two weeks.

We were just fine, but many were in a dire situation.
Many people left home to go look for goods, some of those people died.
The radio said if you were on the roads you could be arrested.

You know the funny thing that will get most people is boredom!


You are under arrest for violating the law and being on the roads!

"AWESOME DUDE! I am starving! Give me 3 hots and a cot!"!

Something else to thing about in a SHTF scenario. Law enforcement.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk


Well..... I would secure my home and wait a bit and have my hand crank radio near me. I have plenty of stored power for at least two days then after that I have solar panels I can put out. Assuming I can go out. Food wise I have a weeks worth for me. I have extra fuel for my car to dip if need be. The situation would suck considering my location so definitely going to be armed.
Honestly hunkering down would be best for me.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:45 PM
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Depends on why. If it were a natural disaster and word on the street was that the Government was intact and coming eventually, I'd hunker down where I lived and survive. I don't have a family, no wife, baby momma, kids in my home or elsewhere. My parents are deceased and my sisters are out there doing whatever, sucking at life. Aww, I love them though!

I live with my deceased Stepdad's younger disabled brother (He's 60 and let's just say.. slow. The only skills he retains from life being in the Reserve, delivering mail to soldiers in Saudi Arabia during the first Gulf War, or was it the second, not sure, and mooching off of and living with his Mom [She went crazy from Alzheimers and COPD from way too much smoking -- possibly from him] are lying, stealing, an absurdely stupid gambling addiction, extreme frugality with utilities and household supplies, and being an annoying beggar). He's not going to be of much assistance. I'm moving out in February and leaving him to his broke misery with my car by the way! Anyways.. sorry, rant over.

That being considered, it'd just be keep your local contacts and knowledge close, ration out your pantry if you have anything, trade what you can for what you need, etc. I do really well with alcohol and cigarettes during week long power outages from bad hurricanes but fortunately I live in Southeast Virginia where we rarely take a direct hit. I guess I always have extra stored?

As for balls to the breeze post apocalypse, I'm screwed. No gun, just my good looks, charisma, and Macguyver meets Bear Grills intelligence and innate knowledge of everything I ever encounter.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:46 PM
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I was on Cozumel about 4 months after the category 5 hurricane in 2005. Thay said come on down everything is fine. A few days after we arrived a heavy wind storm took out dozens of the hastily repaired power lines. The resort I was staying at lost power for days. It was still out on most of the island when we flew out at the end of the week. No one was prepared. I was with a group of divers. Between us we could do almost anything. Every one had dive lights, one guy had a solar charger for phones. I showed a local guy how to hookup a gas station to a generator. That got us fuel for our scooters. So we were mobile. Everyone worked together to cook in the lobby on small gas stoves. The resort people were great, with the exception of being overconfident that the power would be back on soon. I was glad we got out when we did. Food spoilage was bound to kick in very soon.

The way I see it, it’s always is going to be a mater of everyone working together in a disaster. Here at home I would have many more resources to draw on. A power outage of a few weeks would be a problem, but not insurmountable. A few months would be progressively worse. My family and I have plans for various scenarios. We have food, fuel, 4 wheel drive vehicles (including a Duce and a Half), radios, tools, weapons, fresh water, two fallback positions, solar power, and much more.

In the large city’s, what would be a strong inconvenience for us will kill a lot of people. Especially in winter. After a day or two, with no power an apartment would be nearly as cold as outside. The elderly, very young, sick, or weak will go quickly. Propane and gasoline reserves will be gone in a week or less. With no fuel, heating water or food would be nearly impossible. It would not be a pretty site.

The difference between paradise and hell is the flip of a switch.
edit on 2-12-2018 by Nickn3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:49 PM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou

I can't help but think that those who react quickly and start trying to improve their situation right away will in the end, do the best. Those who join together in groups will fare better than those who do not.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:50 PM
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And, when you got on the plane to go home, you bought every candy bar in the machine! It didn't mater if the cost was $14 dollars. You bought every one of them!! You were going "HOME", and nothing else mattered.

If those PayDay bars cost $16,000 dollars, and they were the only ones left, you'd have bought one...you were going "HOME!!"

And, that's the ONLY thing which mattered!!

And, when you looked at that windswept landscape out of the window as you banked out...you never wanted to go back!!!

I've seen that place, and given the choice, I'd hope to NEVER see it again!

BUT....you do what you have to do sometimes!



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 07:56 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
And, when you got on the plane to go home, you bought every candy bar in the machine! It didn't mater if the cost was $14 dollars. You bought every one of them!! You were going "HOME", and nothing else mattered.

If those PayDay bars cost $16,000 dollars, and they were the only ones left, you'd have bought one...you were going "HOME!!"

And, that's the ONLY thing which mattered!!

And, when you looked at that windswept landscape out of the window as you banked out...you never wanted to go back!!!

I've seen that place, and given the choice, I'd hope to NEVER see it again!

BUT....you do what you have to do sometimes!


I’ve been back a time or two, but where ever I go, I don’t pack lite. It the little things, as I’m sure you know, that make life easier.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: seeker1963

originally posted by: Tanga36
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

This is one of the questions that I often wrestle with in my mind. How will I know that THIS is the time?!? We've had major power outages that lasted for days, we've had ice storms that knocked out the power for over a week, we've had tornadoes that obliterated entire neighborhoods, including the one I was in at the time...but I didn't go straight for the survival gear or supplies.

I did go into survival mode but looking back, it was a different type of survival mode, if that makes sense. I was more concerned about helping everyone else and making sure the neighbors were safe and out of harm's way. When I look back at these situations, I can see how any one of them could have easily been far worse and been "the big one" and question why I didn't act in a safer or self-serving way.

What if the next one really IS "the big one" and I don't recognize it at first? Will not going straight for the supplies and gear put me at a major disadvantage and, in turn, put my family at a disadvantage or at risk? How will I know that this time is different than any of the previous times?

For me, the question of "what do you do?" is more about how will I know its time to take action this time? What makes THIS one different than the other times? I often worry that my inability to recognize the seriousness of the situation will be just as bad as not being prepared.


From what you typed, I think you already know. You will be fine.

Thank you for your vote of confidence. I hope you are right.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:04 PM
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originally posted by: mikell
Wife and I covered we have a means to survive. Down side,
a hundred miles from Chicago near the main east west highway





You'll have roving gangs at your doorstep before you know it.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:04 PM
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a reply to: Nickn3

The man camps are nice, but the work is hard.

It's not for the pale or the fearsome.

There are times when you can't see the dawn, or the night, and you live in this world which many cannot even begin to understand. And you go. And you go...again. And, you keep doing it until the job is done.

Eventually, you don't even care about the man camps, you don't care about anything really. You're just raw, and so it goes. You could stay outside all day; you don't even care anymore.

It's a very strange experience. Not one I would care to repeat (again 3x).

And you just learn. You learn to be...alone. And you learn to...survive.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:08 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk

What now, what do you do now???

Gather protection and supplies as much as possible. Fill up as many containers with water.
Drive to my nearby family and friends to make sure they're prepared. And let everyone know that we are going to the nearest oceanic coast and or country border.
Then find a boat.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:12 PM
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a reply to: Ophiuchus 13

So, basically, you are going to depend on others.

Okay, that's an answer.

I'm not sure it's the right answer, but it is an answer.

Thanks!



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

Where am I depending on others?
Please clarify.



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