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Let's talk about survival...REAL survival, no zombies...well, maybe some zombies

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posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 05:53 PM
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Okay, let's not get too wrapped around the axle about the scenario here, okay? It can happen a million different ways. It can be international, national or regional. It can be anything from Armageddon, to a hurricane, to earthquake, to tsunami, to a solar flare, to power outages and civil unrest, to an ice storm and even to the cat farting or aliens landing on Earth (okay? Did I cover all the bases for the techno-ninnies, err, people who want to make themselve's feel important by shooting holes in every single post on ATS on some technicality???) The point is, you're out of power, out of support and on your own. (2nd Disclaimer: it's JUST a hypothetical preparedness discussion...okay??? Jeezus, I HATE having to do disclaimers for all the "cute" people!!)

Are we good with that now?? Can I proceed now, without someone jumping in with some technicality about Earth orbits and sunspot cycles, or molecular density of mushrooms, or some other completely irrelevant and distracting BULL-S#????

Something happens. You and your family are alone, everyone is cut off from the modern trappings of society. The Interwebz is down. Radio is down. The power is out. You are on your own. Some might be in a city, some might be in the country, but most are in the same situation. (GAWD, I feel I have to offer another DISCLAIMER HERE...NO, not everyone in the world is out, just a country, region or state...the POINT IS...YOU are in this region...okay??) (Note: I've grown REALLY TIRED of the Internet smart asses and keyboard commando's...they make discussion impossible with their distractions!).

Sorry for all the disclaimers, folks, but unfortunately you can't start a conversation anymore (anywhere) without them all, and that is sad. Have to satisfy all the butt-hurt people for one reason or other, before you can speak.

Okay...now to the actual OP.........

It's 8pm, and (something) happens. The power goes out and the indications are it won't come back for days. Within hours your water runs low on pressure. The weather outside is terrible (snowstorm, ice storm, hurricane, tsunami, whatever).

There was no announcement. You were unaware. It came on in minutes. And now you're dealing with it.

You've got your "Bug Out Bags", you've got your Bushcraft stuff, you've got your supplies (maybe). It's happened, right now, no time to further prepare, now it's time to "act".

Now reality....there's no news. There's nothing to tell you the situation is just a few days, months...or forever. You know nothing (which is exactly how it will be in real life!). What do you do?

Do you break open the MRE's? Are you completely flat footed, and just dependent on others? What do you do?

Do you run away? Go hide in your cave hideout, dig up your supplies? What do you do?

Do you fire up the generators and use precious fuel now...or do you wait? Do you take up a defensive posture now...or do you wait?

What now???

Serious question. AND, a question we could likely face in our lifetime.

Overreaction is bad, but failure to react is worse.

What now, what do you do now???




posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 05:57 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk


I honestly think those of us prepared for it aren't really prepared for it, if you know what I mean. We can work on the food and water and protection in the what if scenario, but we can never be prepared for the human scenario that might happen. To be honest, I think it will be more than MOST imagine on the scale of how low people will go...



edit on 2-12-2018 by seeker1963 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963

Great answer! I think society will sink into depravity and chaos far sooner than most think!



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: seeker1963

Great answer! I think society will sink into depravity and chaos far sooner than most think!






I will leave you with this FCD. Even if you have stalked up with food and water? If you haven't organized with your neighbors or those who live near you to even discuss it. You won't survive it with your immediate family. It will take an organized armed community to even stand a chance on making it. There will organized armed scumbags who didn't prepare who will be willing to take, rape, murder and anything else they can do to take what you have.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:16 PM
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People do so many things to prepare, but they do these things in such a way to prepare for certain situations, at least most of them do.

Activists plan their scenarios about the opposite.

Doomday-ist's plan their scenarios about doomsday.

But doomsday people and Activists don't see things the same way, and thus are not on the same page.

Now come the zombies. The starving, the un-sheltered, the thirsty, ,the hungry, the needy and the contaminated...the whatever. They're not "zombies", in reality, but they may well be just that!

The Walking Dead, to use a metaphor.

And YOU don't know when it will end. Do you shelter them? Or do you turn them away to protect your own.

It's actually a serious question about humanity, and morality.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963


Psssst...I / we, have!





posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:21 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
People do so many things to prepare, but they do these things in such a way to prepare for certain situations, at least most of them do.

Activists plan their scenarios about the opposite.

Doomday-ist's plan their scenarios about doomsday.

But doomsday people and Activists don't see things the same way, and thus are not on the same page.

Now come the zombies. The starving, the un-sheltered, the thirsty, ,the hungry, the needy and the contaminated...the whatever. They're not "zombies", in reality, but they may well be just that!

The Walking Dead, to use a metaphor.

And YOU don't know when it will end. Do you shelter them? Or do you turn them away to protect your own.

It's actually a serious question about humanity, and morality.



Honestly, I think morality will be your downfall in a SHTF scenario. How will you know who can be trusted? Imagine it's just you and your wife and a stranger walks up and convinces you that he is with you and will defend what you and your wife have. You trust him to only have him shoot you in the back because he wants your wife!


I have thought this thru a lot and I honestly believe when and if it comes to this, even those of us with morals, UNLESS we already have a prepared community for defense, will have to resort to our primal instincts to survive.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk


I'm in the "I'm doomed" crowd.

Sorry. No last minute heroics for me. I'd prep the kids best I could, then watch the sunset with my bride.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:22 PM
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originally posted by: Flyingclaydisk
a reply to: seeker1963


Psssst...I / we, have!




Good on you brother!



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: seeker1963

Hmmmm....I am far darker than that. I trust no one! I won't even sit with my back to the door in a restaurant. (freaks the wife out). Anyone creeps on my beloved wife...they better be very afraid!!! I have eyes in the back of my head, and it doesn't take long for most to figure this out. No one gets around behind me with a firearm...ever!

ETA - Gunslingers of the Old West died or less!




edit on 12/2/2018 by Flyingclaydisk because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk


If you haven't already, check out a youtube channel "Blackscoutsurvival". He gets into a lot of SHTF scenarios. He is a vet who I believe if not mistaken or memory serves me right was a Green Beret. I really enjoy his survival techniques and wisdom. His video are usually under 10 min. so easy to binge on.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:33 PM
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It happens at 8:00 pm? I'd go to bed and wait until tomorrow to worry about it. Next morning I'd break out the generator, go to the gun safe, try to find out what the issue is, talk to the neighbors. It would be pretty normal for the first week or so. I'm assuming no local damage here, so water would be fine. I'd try to recon a fuel source pretty quickly, but that would not last all that long regardless. The local rivers have fish and the sea shore is within walking distance. I have a feeling the coyotes would get scarce pretty quickly. There's plenty of wood, so no issue with heat. Locally we'd have to get together for an action plan. I'm old, so I don't have to last all that long.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

That has actually happened to me. It was middle of the day instead of 8 PM, but we were under a tornado warning... several of them as a matter of fact. It was April of 2011, and the twisters were coming in waves from the south instead of the southwest. One took out the power lines at Browns Ferry nuclear plant where we get our power. separating it from the grid and forcing a SCRAM. Another twister took out our backup power, the Widow's Creek Steam Plant. It had structural damage as well, enough for TVA to go ahead and decommission it later.

When it happened, my son was on a field trip to Montgomery. I had no idea how he was. Me and my wife were watching the news and I had the computer watching Internet coverage as well, trying to see where every tornado was so we could be prepared. When the power died, we lost both. The rest of the day we spent sitting on the couch listening to the rain and wind, trying to tune into any sound that sounded like a freight train so we might have time to hit the ditch in front of the place.

Every time the weather would slack between waves, I walked outside and checked the sky. I know how the weather works around here and what the different cloud formations mean. Every time, I also found more damage. Our trailer survived, but outbuildings and animal pens were hit pretty hard. The wind during the waves was so strong it wasn't safe to use a car, so we were pretty much stuck.

The next day, the weather cleared. We surveyed the damage and made sure neighbors were OK. We walked where we could to conserve gas. All cell towers were down, so we had no communications. The landlines were out as well. We ate cold food that day.

During the following week, we found out how bad it was. All the stores were closed; no one had any power. Even the gas pumps were all out of order. Within a couple of days a few stations used portable generators to pump gas. One of my neighbors borrowed a small generator to run his well to flush the toilets, store drinking water, and his freezer long enough to keep everything from ruining. The plugs didn't fit, so I did some fancy wiring to make it work, and in return got to run my well and fridge. I also took a couple of dead inverters and made one working unit to charge cell phones. By then we were getting some cell service sporadically. I charged everyone's phones in return for their assistance.

As the week passed by, a few stores managed to get generators running and opened. Home Depot was one. They sold out of generators within an hour of opening.

One neighbor fired up a charcoal barbecue smoker he has and offered to cook any meat anyone had for them before it ruined. We all ate pretty good for a couple of days thanks to him.

The area around here became a barter community... everyone doing what they could to help others. Those with chainsaws cleared trees, I kept things charged, people carpooled into town to save gas, and food was passed around as needed. Everyone helped everyone. I went and picked up my son at the time they had been scheduled to return, and luckily he was OK. He had some pretty scary horror stories about the devastation they had driven through though.

I still wasn't out of options even when the power came back on. I have a wood stove in my shop with cooking eyes on it had we needed to use it. I have ammunition and an area to hunt in. The one thing I wished we had had was canned vegetables... something we plan on fixing very soon. Until then, we know we have neighbors to count on for that.

In the nearby larger cities, things were worse. Whenever a gas station opened, the lines were so long they had to ration gas. Fights broke out in almost every line that formed. Crime was rampant, since the lights were out. Those who had generators were stuck at home, afraid to venture out; those who didn't were simply trying to survive any way they could. There was little to no cooperation like there was here.

In short, we'll do what we have to do to survive, and we know who we can count on and who we can't. That was an eye-opener itself... you'd be surprised who will come to your aid in such a situation and who won't.

TheRedneck



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: schuyler

And that's a fair enough answer, tied to an actual real-world existence.

My reactions would be similar, but a little more delayed.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:42 PM
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originally posted by: seeker1963
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

...We can work on the food and water and protection in the what if scenario, but we can never be prepared for the human scenario that might happen. To be honest, I think it will be more than MOST imagine on the scale of how low people will go...



Whenever people mention the human aspect of a SHTF scenario, I'm always reminded of Black Friday footage,



It's scary how low some people will sink for a cheap telly, imagine the chaos when people actually need things like water, food, medicine and fuel.

Not a nice place to be, I imagine.




posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:48 PM
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a reply to: MerkabaTribeEntity


Yep! Imagine if they needed food and water to survive because they spent all their money on tv's and cell phones? I imagine many think I am exaggerating, but for those who do think so, I feel sorry for you if things such a electricity goes down for months.

I like Rednecks post. As a community they worked together and got snip done. While in the cities chaos erupted. Give me the country life anyday!


I am stocked up with dried beans, rice, tomato paste, spices and salt. Also 20 cases of bottles water on a continuing basis. Food is covered and with the food I can barter for anything else I might need.
edit on 2-12-2018 by seeker1963 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:54 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

This is one of the questions that I often wrestle with in my mind. How will I know that THIS is the time?!? We've had major power outages that lasted for days, we've had ice storms that knocked out the power for over a week, we've had tornadoes that obliterated entire neighborhoods, including the one I was in at the time...but I didn't go straight for the survival gear or supplies.

I did go into survival mode but looking back, it was a different type of survival mode, if that makes sense. I was more concerned about helping everyone else and making sure the neighbors were safe and out of harm's way. When I look back at these situations, I can see how any one of them could have easily been far worse and been "the big one" and question why I didn't act in a safer or self-serving way.

What if the next one really IS "the big one" and I don't recognize it at first? Will not going straight for the supplies and gear put me at a major disadvantage and, in turn, put my family at a disadvantage or at risk? How will I know that this time is different than any of the previous times?

For me, the question of "what do you do?" is more about how will I know its time to take action this time? What makes THIS one different than the other times? I often worry that my inability to recognize the seriousness of the situation will be just as bad as not being prepared.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

First you search for other info, find a high spot and look for other signs of life. Perfect time, the cover of dark and easier to spot other activity?



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: Tanga36
a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

This is one of the questions that I often wrestle with in my mind. How will I know that THIS is the time?!? We've had major power outages that lasted for days, we've had ice storms that knocked out the power for over a week, we've had tornadoes that obliterated entire neighborhoods, including the one I was in at the time...but I didn't go straight for the survival gear or supplies.

I did go into survival mode but looking back, it was a different type of survival mode, if that makes sense. I was more concerned about helping everyone else and making sure the neighbors were safe and out of harm's way. When I look back at these situations, I can see how any one of them could have easily been far worse and been "the big one" and question why I didn't act in a safer or self-serving way.

What if the next one really IS "the big one" and I don't recognize it at first? Will not going straight for the supplies and gear put me at a major disadvantage and, in turn, put my family at a disadvantage or at risk? How will I know that this time is different than any of the previous times?

For me, the question of "what do you do?" is more about how will I know its time to take action this time? What makes THIS one different than the other times? I often worry that my inability to recognize the seriousness of the situation will be just as bad as not being prepared.


From what you typed, I think you already know. You will be fine.



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 06:58 PM
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Wife and I covered we have a means to survive. Down side,
a hundred miles from Chicago near the main east west highway






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