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Which printer to use for synthetic printing Help needed

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posted on Dec, 1 2018 @ 06:55 PM
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Hi ATS

Could anyone suggest what is a common type of "home consumer grade" printer used to print on synthetic paper?

Its suggested that the GSM and "melting point" are important considerations and should be checked with the manual.

I've tried googling but getting to many ads etc. As this is a hobby I dont want to get into expensive commercial printers.

Any help would be appreciated

thanks
TheConstruKctionofLight










posted on Dec, 1 2018 @ 07:01 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight


I don't know what GSM and "melting point" are, but I use an HP 7500A Wide Format, I have printed on vinyl sheets, plastic transparencies and cloth fabrics.



posted on Dec, 1 2018 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Laser.

I just got a steal on a OKI C332 wth2 sets of toner for $200 shipped!




posted on Dec, 1 2018 @ 07:04 PM
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a reply to: Sookiechacha

Inkjet sprays ink across surfaces.

Laser melts plastic powder INTO materials.

Ink fades, runs. Plastic endures.



posted on Dec, 1 2018 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

There's also LED now:


LEDs are more efficient and reliable than conventional laser printers, since they have fewer moving parts, allowing for less mechanical wear. Depending on design, LED printers can have faster rates of print than some laser-based designs, and are generally cheaper to manufacture. In contrast to LED printers, laser printers require combinations of rotating mirrors and lenses that must remain in alignment throughout their use. The LED print head has no moving parts. wikipedia


But if they cost a ton more, probably just get laser as they're already like 50 times more reliable than dastardly inkjet.

I have a $300 ink HP here I got and after about 50 pages the printheads fouled up. Which it had two I think it was and they each cost nearly $100. Too much use they go bad, not enough use ink heads go bad. Etc. Laser dont do that. And the toners tend to hold about 100 times what ink cartridges holds (between refills). If you do have ink though look for a "inkwell system". And always refill your own stuff (you usually need refill chips). There are also mod chips a lot of times that if you can do surface mount scale soldering (really small solder joints) a handful of solder joints and you wont need reset chips anymore).



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:01 AM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

Thanks - they seem to be at a good Aus price as well - will look into it



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:05 AM
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a reply to: Sookiechacha

The HP 7500A Wide Format seems to be around $530 Aus.

Hmm -

GSM are grains/sq/Metre .

Melting point is the temp that your plastic paper can withstand before it turns into Laser Goop!



Thanks



posted on Dec, 2 2018 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: IgnoranceIsntBlisss

Thanks for the detailed reply - we've been using a brother monochrome laser for about 18 mths now with no probs.
Very efficient and cost effective.

I'm joining some classes on making our own modular eurorack synth modules. Soldering will be lesson no.1. So perhaps now's the time to play around with refilling laser toners.

ATS is really blessed to have you around.




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