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British Government on the Verge of Collapse.

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posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: SprocketUK

LOL.




posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: SprocketUK

In fairness to Mark Carney, part of his remit is to figure out potential ramifications. The worst case scenario being one such scenario.

He has been critiscised for not having more positive outcomes but, in all honesty, none of the possible economic forecasts i have seen have been particularly rosy - the best case scenario showing around 1.5% shrinkage of the economy (at least short term).

Obviously, none of us truly know how it will turn out. I do though find it rich though that the Brexit Camp (not supporters but the actual Brexiteers themselves) constantly critiscise any negative forecasts, despite making up whatever fact they liked in the build up to the referendum.



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 08:02 AM
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a reply to: Flavian

I think much of the criticism stems from producing reports generally based on a perfect storm of bad things happening.



There are a few economists around predicting growth, but really, despite the growth in the economy over the years, we have more people using foodbanks than ever before, so it's not just growth that matters.



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: andy06shake




Domestically its nigh on impossible to feed the population we now have.


Yet 30% of food stuff is thrown away. Bonkers isn’t it?



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

Downright wasteful is what it is.

That being said I do it myself, go to ASDA buy £170 worth of food a fortnight and end up flinging out around £5-£10 at the end of the week.

Not exactly a food mountain but it is a waste.
edit on 30-11-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 10:58 AM
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originally posted by: Cobaltic1978

If we change our minds now, they will go full E.U on us and we will be adopting the Euro without any say before you know it.



There's only one reason I'd be up for the Euro, it would save the colossal waste of time and ironically enough money, changing the face on every coin and note we have when the head of state dies, by the look of things we're gonna have to do it twice in a short time in tbe future



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: djz3ro

I can remember having the head of George Vi on shilling coins (5p) well into the late 1970's, so I don't know if that would be a problem, as he died in 1952.



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 11:26 AM
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originally posted by: Flavian

originally posted by: djz3ro

only time that happens is when weather disrupts supply.


Being from the land of the flying haggis, isn't that every other day?


Not at all but you've been misinformed, Haggis, or Haggii in the plural, have shorter legs on one side to easier navigate mountainsides...



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 11:29 AM
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originally posted by: SprocketUK
a reply to: andy06shake


It's brighter than Mark Carney and his remainer goons would have you believe.

Did you see the opening credits to This Week last night?



That blonde brexiteer was incredibly annoying



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 11:32 AM
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originally posted by: Cobaltic1978
a reply to: djz3ro

I can remember having the head of George Vi on shilling coins (5p) well into the late 1970's, so I don't know if that would be a problem, as he died in 1952.




It still costs money to recall the ones with Lizzy on it and and change all the molds and plate at the Mint and to restrike new coins and print new notes and takes a lot of man hours . It's a waste...



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 11:42 AM
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The world will not end, of that I am certain. For the rest, I am sure we will survive.

I don't have the knowledge to profess imminent destruction of either economy or society, I just have historic knowledge of how, and why, we survived before.

If we survived before, we will again, if not, hey...we still have the rivers and lakes.




posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: djz3ro

There all bloody annoying on both sides, even the ones that make sense, quite frankly the whole affair of Brexit is annoying in the extreme.

Merry Christmas and an unhappy Brexit might just be the in card to send this year truth be told. LoL

Baggsie the copyright on that by the way.

edit on 30-11-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 12:43 PM
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Thank you for all of the comments so far on this thread, my apologies for not having the time to address each one individually. I have however read them all and there is some interesting thought provoking arguments raised so far and a few interesting themes that come out when reading the comments that I would like to address.

Many have argued that the UK has weathered two world wars and lost of other adversary during our history and therefore have no need to worry about the long term impact of Brexit. I would respectfully disagree with this argument, I believe that we have to account for the changes in the world and the reality is that a full on no deal would be very bad for the UK. I do not doubt we would survive as a nation but I do not believe that we would be as prosperous as we are now, I believe our standard of living would fall as would our economic status.

There have also been a few who argue that it would be a slap in the face to democracy to have a second referendum, now as I said in the OP this would be difficult but not because it would be be undemocratic but rather just because of the legalities and logistics of a UK referendum. Other EU states have had second referendums such as Ireland's second referendum of the Lisbon Treaty. Its interesting that these arguments seem to apply fine to the Brexit but not Scottish independence, nobody says its undemocratic to ask the Scottish people about a second vote on independence and nor should they. The fact is that Brexit won with a 1.7% margin since then the realities of what Brexit really means have become clear. What has also become clear is that elements of Vote Leave where not playing by the rules and evidence of Russian interference. Indeed there has also been a swing in public opinion regarding Brexit that suggests that two years down the line, now that the real impact of Brexit has become clear that the public would now not support it.

Lastly the issue of sovereignty also seems to be popping up, yes it is true that many UK laws can be traced back to Brussels however the 27 states of the EU remain sovereign and the UK is probably the most sovereign of them in the current set up. We are not part of the Euro nor are we subject to the Schengen area, we still retain control over our international affairs, our defence, justice and economy all be it with some EU influence. I would actually go as far as to argue that the argument that the UK has lost sovereignty to the EU is dispelled by the very fact that we have triggered article 50.

Lastly, one final note, England is not the UK.



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

England is not even London nether, and there is the majority of the Brexit supporters right there.



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 01:00 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

" What has also become clear is that elements of Vote Leave where not playing by the rules and evidence of Russian interference. Indeed there has also been a swing in public opinion regarding Brexit that suggests that two years down the line, now that the real impact of Brexit has become clear that the public would now not support it."

gonna have to interupt you there.
i object to this soft propaganda.
you only speak for yourself.
thats why we all get one vote each.

"evidence of Russian interference"
c'mon, muh russia



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: username74

"I would actually go as far as to argue that the argument that the UK has lost sovereignty to the EU is dispelled by the very fact that we have triggered article 50. "

and that is pure hyperbole

but from your opening post
"Me, I go for the full on economic and political collapse within the first year
Its strange to me that nobody seems to be talking much about this, the fact that if you boil this all down your government is on the verge of a total collapse. We seem to have found ourselves backed into this impossible corner, we are in the ultimate catch 22 with no way out and its all going to come to a head very soon"

however i have to agree with this, and i do find it odd that no one sees it.
but its baked into the cake, brexit or not.
edit on 30-11-2018 by username74 because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-11-2018 by username74 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 01:13 PM
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originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

What has also become clear is that elements of Vote Leave where not playing by the rules and evidence of Russian interference.



Yay, I wondered if I'd be able to use my Hetfield meme again...




originally posted by: OtherSideOfTheCoin

Lastly the issue of sovereignty also seems to be popping up, yes it is true that many UK laws can be traced back to Brussels however the 27 states of the EU remain sovereign and the UK is probably the most sovereign of them in the current set up. We are not part of the Euro nor are we subject to the Schengen area, we still retain control over our international affairs, our defence, justice and economy all be it with some EU influence.



Which are all reasons I maintain we weren't a country to sit back and take the EU's rules and were indeed leading in Europe...



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: username74

He does not just speak for himself, i think a second referendum could not hurt nether.

It's not something that's unheard of, especially considering how close the vote was in the first referendum.

The only issue would be cost and delay, but it's not like Brexit has not already cost an arm and a leg.

2 years later if the will of the people is still the same then so be it, no harm in putting it to a vote again now people actually understand what they are voting for and what it actually entails.
edit on 30-11-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake

The thing is whats going to cost the country more a "No-Deal" situation or going for a second referendum.

I think when you balance it up a second referendum would be best, now sure we could find ourselves still in the situation of public support for Brexit in which case I think we would just have to suck it up.

I honestly believe though if it did come to a second referendum then the vote would be overwhelmingly in support of remaining.



posted on Nov, 30 2018 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin




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