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Was Australia largely desert before European settlers? What enviornment was there before?

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posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:13 PM
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I've watched a few tv shows that show a lot of the Australian country and what I've noticed the most is that it is largely desert (where they show at least) but these parts still seem to have creeks flowing through them. I noticed that even in these areas with flowing waters the trees around them are not very large or tall. I'm wondering if Aus was like this before or if this desert effect was due to clear cutting and not having anything to put water back into the atmosphere. It is odd to see what looks like desert in the SW of the US (minus cactus) but have raging rivers and soggy roads. The thunderstorms are pretty intense as well and are truly amazing to behold (even from TV!).


Does anyone know what it used to be like and if there had been more large trees, or even lust much more trees than what there is now or if it is how it has pretty much always been.




posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:22 PM
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Depends on how far back in time you want to go.
Last week, still desert....



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Don't really know but i suspect it is what it was for the most part. Progression around the populated areas but the same for the most part elsewhere. Am not an Aussie but would enjoy visiting their outback.

I do know they have introduced invasive species in the past to control other species and that is probably having some effect but largely the same i suspect.
edit on 26-11-2018 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:31 PM
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Non subtropical or tropical coastal areas pick up the rainfall from the oceans, Australia is typical of most places with no hills or mountains in its centre and large land masses.
No Himalayas, Rockies or Alps in the centre
Dry because the wet doesnt make it inland very often, maybe a cyclone or something will bring rain in

Yes it's mostly been dry and dessert



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:31 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT

All the OP needs to do is to look at a rainfall map of the continent/country.

The map will show AVERAGE rainfall.

You are likely in central Australia to get that rainfall in one day, and nothing for the other 364 days.

This is why there are no big trees. They cannot grow.

Other parts get great rainfall. Australia is really big so generalized statements don't do well.

The Outback can kill you easily. Heat / no water / no neighbors within walking distance. Always take a powerful two way radio.

Our doctors visit by air not by cars. Flying Doctors we have.

P


edit on 26/11/2018 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Awesome info but I have to ask your doctor flies to you personally? Or the doctor comes to town?



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Conversed with another Aussie the other day. He was fascinated with the old American west. I'm fascinated with the Australian outback and history. Would love to spend a few months there. But alas, I'm destined to explore my own home these days.



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:49 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
a reply to: pheonix358

Conversed with another Aussie the other day. He was fascinated with the old American west. I'm fascinated with the Australian outback and history. Would love to spend a few months there. But alas, I'm destined to explore my own home these days.

Beautifull to look at but really really brutal environment.
Most of our continent is uninhabitable, at least by feeble humans.



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 09:56 PM
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originally posted by: Aryabhata
a reply to: pheonix358

Awesome info but I have to ask your doctor flies to you personally? Or the doctor comes to town?


The Station (Ranch but bigger, much bigger) will radio in an emergency. An aircraft with necessary people on board flies out and lands on the Station's air strip.

If no airstrip is near enough, they will land on a dirt road or such. Bush pilots are daredevils sometimes.

Other medical help is by radio although satellite internet is used a great deal these days. Medicines come by air mail.

P



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:07 PM
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a reply to: Artlogic

At 68 now I would probably be considered feeble by Aussie standards at this point.



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:18 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
a reply to: Artlogic

At 68 now I would probably be considered feeble by Aussie standards at this point.

No my friend, not at all



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:32 PM
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originally posted by: CharlesT
a reply to: Artlogic

At 68 now I would probably be considered feeble by Aussie standards at this point.


The tough muscle man will perish.

The wise man will not because he plans in advance for the environment he enters.

P



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:44 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Confucius says? Whether he did or it's original, I like it.

edit on 26-11-2018 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: pheonix358

originally posted by: Aryabhata
a reply to: pheonix358

Awesome info but I have to ask your doctor flies to you personally? Or the doctor comes to town?


The Station (Ranch but bigger, much bigger) will radio in an emergency. An aircraft with necessary people on board flies out and lands on the Station's air strip.

If no airstrip is near enough, they will land on a dirt road or such. Bush pilots are daredevils sometimes.

Other medical help is by radio although satellite internet is used a great deal these days. Medicines come by air mail.



P


Good call P,

Great mob the royal flying doctor service. I was a patient twice and my wife/partner was flown out for a birth and my son for an accident. Each time all safely taken from the desert to Alice Springs, safely.

I make it a habit to donate to them. They are very busy day and night.

Kind regards,

bally



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Australia is like it is because of 2 main factors if I'm not mistaken, it's current Location and it's current topography. The Ocean Currents and Winds just aren't favorable for lots of moisture in its present location and being relatively flat doesn't help with wet climates either.

Back in the day when it was part of Pangea and Gondwanaland, it's was probably moister, being that it was more on the coast than the interior of those supercontinents.



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: bally001

Good evening, bally. Glad to see you drop in.



Is that 3 or 4 Aussies here tonight? Bully!
edit on 26-11-2018 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-11-2018 by CharlesT because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Pheonix358 was pretty well spot on.

I spent a few years in both the Tanami and Gibson deserts.

Storms were massive but welcome. I was out there one year and most of the Tanami was underwater. Like a sea, I kid you not. Rescue and evacs by helicopter only. Whole communities were put up in a tent township at Alice Springs.

Then 2 weeks later it was just about all gone. Lots of water holes and flowing creeks remained.

For a desert I really never could understand where the fish came from. Just little stuff but a lot. And the frogs after being buried for years, they surface, complete a quicky life cycle and disappear until the next big wet.

Up on The Rock, Uluru or Ayers Rock during one wet I saw rock holes up there with ancient looking inch long crustaceans swimming around. Amazing place central Australia.

Kind regards,

Bally




posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT

Cheers mate, same to you. I like threads like these and your last thread that I replied to regarding westerns.

Central Australia can be deadly. If the heat doesn't get you, some of the critters might.

Kind regards,

bally



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 11:05 PM
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a reply to: bally001

Back at you mate.
Can't take the heat any more but I'd love to experience your great country. Our west and your outback are unique in their own rights and we should be proud of both our heritages. I am and I know you are too. Salute!



posted on Nov, 26 2018 @ 11:13 PM
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a reply to: CharlesT



Come in winter mate, quite mild in places. I live up in a Region of New South Wales called the Northern Rivers now. On the east coast. May call me retired I guess but I still work occasionally.

Welcome to visit anytime.

Desert is good in winter too. Dry but comfortable. My favorite trip is along a stretch call the Sandy Blight Junction road. Amazing changes in landscape. Test out all manner of 4 wheel driving.

Kind regards,

bally



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