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Collegiate Fraternal Orders and their ties to secret societies

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posted on Apr, 15 2005 @ 05:09 AM
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Originally posted by Baldassare Cossa
Senrak, you have mentioned that KS "stole" Masonic ritual before, but KA's ritual "stole" from Masonry in the same measure. They are both fine groups, so why the condescension?

[edited quote - nygdan]

[edit on 14-4-2005 by Nygdan]


Many college fraternities "borrowed" directly from adult fraternal societies like Freemasonry, etc. Kappa Sigma "borrowed" very much of it VERBATIM. Kappa Alpha has some Masonic similarities, but only some. I didn't mean it to be condescending at all, just factual.

I'd be interested to know what you wrote that the moderator edited. Too bad he got here before me. Care to send me a U2U?




posted on Apr, 15 2005 @ 05:15 AM
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Originally posted by 7YearItch
Does anyone know another web forum or site where these subjects might be expressed more opnely and various information could be more easily shared without threat of removal from this site or terror tactic type legal e-mails being sent to Simon. Thanks


7YearItch,

I sent you a U2U with an answer to this question. I wasn't sure if you could reply to U2U's yet...I think you have to have a certain number of points first. Anyway if you'll check it out, I've given you the name of a good location for the truly open discussion of such things.



posted on Apr, 18 2005 @ 03:41 AM
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I'd just like to confirm, first off, that the Mystic 7 was, as I understand it (according to The Son of the Stars) a college fraternal organization that was absorbed into Beta Theta Pi. As far as Sigma Chi goes, it was essentially a group that split off from DKE. Originally they called themselves Sigma Phi (which was already the name of one of the first college fraternities in the states), but changed to Sigma Chi when they learned of this conflict. (according to B. Hume Morris, scholar of college fraternities and rituals, Historian of Beta Theta Pi International Fraternity)
I'd also like to say that most college fraternities have some symbolism tied to their names. With Beta Theta Pi, this symbolism is vast, i don't know about other fraternities.



posted on May, 10 2005 @ 02:36 AM
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senrak,

could you please U2U me w/ an email that I could privately chat with you on the subject between Pike and Odd Fellows?? I would greatly appreciate it.



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 02:52 PM
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I don't have enough posts to u2u yet and I was wondering if anyone would be willing to share some thoughts about the pi kappa alpha rituals ties to odd fellowship and masonry? as well as maybe sigma nu's?



posted on Jul, 1 2005 @ 02:53 PM
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or could some one post an email to the u2u so I could discuss rituals in private?



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 11:59 AM
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Hello,

I am a Virginia Mason and also a member of several appendent Masonic bodies. I am also a member of a class society. For years I have been interested in college fraternities and also groups like Oddfellows, Freemasonry, etc. I enjoy reading how, in their rituals, they communicate the most important aspects of their group. I have read a few of these rituals and would like to discuss them with someone else who enjoys this as well.

Anyone know much of the Mystical 7 at Wesleyan, or of the Secret 7 at the University of Virginia?

Zauberer



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 03:43 PM
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the title of this thread is;

"Collegiate Fraternal Orders and their ties to secret societies, mysticism, and the occult (more than"



i am an alum of theta xi, kappa mu chapter. I can tell you we had rituals, but they were very loosely based on what the prior class had done and so on and so forth. There must be a lot of "dilution" along the way. A ritual carried out in 1950 was probably a lot different than mine.

What I'm missing is the reference to mysticism and occult. There really isn't much to a greek house other than bonding tradition and honor and brotherhood. We had annual charity drives and intramural sports.
I never saw anything occult like or mystical.

.02



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 05:20 PM
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Well I am new and still trying to navigate around this website so if I put some subject out there where it doesn't belong, I apologize. I will try to do better next time.

I was a member of a college fraternity and the mystical thing that most of them tried to do was partying.

But I've heard that some college groups like the Mystical 7 and K.A. Society go beyond this sort of behavior and delve into the esoteric and symbols. I find this terribly interesting and would like to know more.



posted on Jul, 18 2005 @ 09:01 PM
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Oh for crying out loud. I go through rush, pledging, hell week, initiation, etc. etc.

And to think all I needed to do was u2u.

(Gee. Nobody here would be trying to find out their competitors secrets would they??? No, of course not... How hilarious to flash some-one the right signals while pumping the keg.)


A scholar and a gentleman/a heart beneath his vest
Always full of devilment/ but better than the rest

[edit on 18-7-2005 by 2nd Hand Thoughts]



posted on Jul, 21 2005 @ 04:18 PM
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I'm afraid that you have my motives wrong. I'm not trying to pry secrets from anyone. I just wanted to see if anyone knew anything about the mystical/transcendentalist/philosophical background of the Mystical 7, 7 Society, or the K.A. Society.



posted on Jul, 22 2005 @ 01:44 PM
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zauberer

My outburst was misplaced. I don't think that is what you are doing. I've looked into my own fraternities history. Our badge is entirely made out of masonic symbols, etc.

In other threads though there is open trading of rituals, etc. If people are going to do it, they'll do it. I just don't get it. What you are interested in is interesting to me as well (my own interest doesn't really cross over into other organizations though...that's just me). Maybe you and I are alike in that I know I don't care to know initiations, meetings, etc. Fraternity brothers of mine are masons and I don't think it's wrong for them to point out certain similarities to me without being overly specific. The fact that a lot of this stuff is posted (again, not in this thread) for millions to see is rather discouraging.

I just hate to think there are university students who ruin their experiences by coming across info that spoils the whole process.



posted on Jul, 26 2006 @ 07:44 PM
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I am both a Kappa Sigma and a Mason. Kappa Sigma's ritual was written by a Mason and emulates the second degree, with surprising (to the candidate) third degree type of ending. However, while the form of ritual may be similar to Masonry, the story is quiet different, beautiful, and very fitting for the situation of a university student trying to find his way in early life. The signs also definitely are not the same when given.

No doubt Masonry, IOOF and other major societies influenced the form of college fratenity ritual. Many of these college rituals came about in a period when secret societies were fluorishing. Its not a surprise if Masons were writing the rituals. They used what they knew.

I think what is more interesting is the origin of any stories that are unique to the college fraternity. Kappa Sigma, for example, appears to have a lost history. The 600-year old characters and places referenced in the ritual were real, but the story of how that legend was sustained over time and transferred from Europe to America is in itself now an unverified legend. Did it happen or did the founders make it up? And to make matters worse, we're not even sure that our founding brothers are the true founders. Our founders were 'zeta' chapter in Virgina, but their initial constitution that referenced an 'Alpha' chapter in Baltimore that is otherwise unknown. Presumably Alpha came before Zeta.... The fraternity has received family heirloom badges that appear to be pre-civil war, and so one theory is that the true founding in the US was lost with the civil war and the fraternity only reclaimed afterward by a remaining chapter, with the initial pre-war history lost. So there are far greater 'secrets' to unearth in fraternity rituals and histories like this beyond their masonic connection.



posted on Aug, 1 2006 @ 05:28 AM
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Could you elaborate on Kappa Sigma's history as presented in the initiation ceremony? I am very curious as to what the original society was and how it relates to freemasonry and Kappa Sigma today.



posted on Aug, 25 2006 @ 03:51 PM
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Well. as for the whole discussion of the history of Kappa Sigma being connected to an ancient student society in Europe, that info has been closely guarded by the members for over 125 years.

I would like to make a few corrections as to Kappa Sigma. Kappa Sigma was not founded my members of the Free Masons, and William McCormick DID NOT introduce the "Bologna Tradition" into Kappa Sigma. The fact is the order does not truly know who the first was to tell the story of Chrysoloras and his students. The organization believes that in 1868 George Miles Arnold and a friend known as George Hollingsworth went to Europe to study, prior to their enrolling in college. While in Paris they met a man who was the last man in his family, and striking conversation with Arnold and Hollingsworth, they learned of an old student society that was founded in Italy around 1400, and remained secret in nature for centuries, the secrets being handed down from father to son. Most of this information can be found in old Kappa Sigma publications, and is not secret. Also, if you find old editions of the Baird's Manual to American Cllege Fraternities, you will find the same story (and the name of that society in Italy).

As I stated, at the time of the American founding of Kappa Sigma in 1869, none of the members were Masons. The original initiation that was used by the early founders was nothing more than an oath of secercy, reading the constitution, and then the telling of the secrets of the order to the new member. No elaborate ceremony. The original oath and charge of the order was however taken from a copy of a publication on Masonic Secrets that one of the founders roomates had. They read the booklet then used this as the template. Later, when S. A. Jackson came along, he saw that the ceremony needed to be refined nd began to work on it. If you look at almost any of the college fraternities and their beginnings, you will see that in fact most did not "steal" from Masonry at first, what they stole from was the original concept of initiation as used by Phi Beta Kappa before it went honorary. (Phi Beta Kappa was the first secret fraternity in America -- 1776).

Many groups years later would revise their rituals to suit the needs of the order or the interests of the members. The borrowing of symbols or forms of ceremony was in vouge at the time. No one would admit it of course, but almost all groups used the rituals of the organizations they either belonged to themselves or had friends in. Remember that in the 1800s, almost all fraternities founded prior to the Civil War were merely Literary in nature, they were social outlets for students at colleges in which students weren't allowed to question authority. They met in secret to discuss the current events and to have fun, both of which they could not due in public or in any classroom.

Getting back to Kappa Sigma, Jackson when he began to re-invent the ritual of KS, used the forms from several groups he belonged to, most of the ceremony is actually based loosely on the ceremonies of the Knights of Pythias (itself a very young organization at the time 1870s-1880s). Jackson had a story told to him Arnold and Hollingsworth, and need a way to tell the story to new initiates in a way they would be impressed upon. The initiation process used today has been unchanged from Jasckons work.

To add my two cents worth to some of the other posts here, I'd like to add that Kappa Alpha Order's rituals were also based on another college fraternity of the time that had just recenlt gone defunct, it was known as Epsilon Alpha. Nothing is really known about this organization except what KA O. has in their archives (members only stuff).

I'll add more about M7 in another post.



posted on Aug, 25 2006 @ 04:06 PM
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Originally posted by chrysoloras
To add my two cents worth to some of the other posts here, I'd like to add that Kappa Alpha Order's rituals were also based on another college fraternity of the time that had just recenlt gone defunct, it was known as Epsilon Alpha. Nothing is really known about this organization except what KA O. has in their archives (members only stuff).


Sorry to correct you, but just a minor technicality here. The defunct fratenity that Phi Kappa Chi (which later became Kappa Alpha Order) was based on was called "Epsilon Theta" It had two degrees called "Epsilon" and "Theta" respectively (creative, huh?) The only similarities between it and what is now the Kappa Alpha Order ritual are the officers titles and one line in the ritual. The rest was totally thrown out when S.Z. Ammen re-wrote the ritual.



posted on Aug, 25 2006 @ 04:07 PM
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Mystical Seven Society at Wesleyan was one of the most original organizations to have ever been founded. Its rituals were not based on Masonry nor any other Fraternal organization existing at that time.

The rituals used by M7 were all based on the number seven, and they incorporated a lot of Gnostic like teachings. They used a lot of information from the Bible as their basis. Only members existing today at Weslelyan really know the truth about it.

In 1868 an offshoot of the Mystical Seven was founded at the Univ. of Virgina, called the Mystic Seven. Much debate has taken place as to the legitimacy of whether this group was or was not part of the Wesleyan group. However, in 1890 the Mystic Seven and its chapters did merge with Beta Theta Pi. Beta Theta Pi at the time did incorporate some of its ceremonies into their rituals. Later these became optional for chapters to use or not use. (A similiar thing happen a few years prior with another group known as WWW or Rainbow Society, and Delta Tau Delta. WWW it has been said was an offshoot from the Mystical Seven as well.)

I have many records and rituals from a fraternal order which was founded in the 1800s known as the Heptasophs or Seven Wise men. It has also been rumored that this group had ties with the Mystical Seven Society as well.

As I stated in my last email, Phi Beta Kappa started off as a secret society, and many fraternities founed in the early 1800s, like KA Society, Sigma Phi, Delta Phi were all based upon Phi Beta Kappa.

One last thing, there was in the 1800s another Kappa Alpha organization which existed and much research has been done to try and solidify its origins. The Organization was supposedly founded in 1812, but no records or documents exist prior to the 1848. This society was known as Kuklos Adelphon. Its rituals were stolen on one of their campuses by another fraternity and KA leter disbanded prior to the Civil War. It was a strong southern society. In 1868 it did have a very brief revival in a little town called Pulaski, TN (This organization later came to be known as the KKK.) The founders of the Ku Klux Klan drew the name and constitutional things from Kuklos Adelphon, but actually used the rituals on intiation from another older defunct fraternal society known as the Sons of Malta.

I have much information on almost every collegiate society if any one wants to know more. I also am looking for more factual info on other groups as well, by anyone who is willing to share.

Thanks.
Chrysoloras

PS Actually, there has been a great deal of research done on Manual Chrysoloras which the Kappa Sigma fraternity knowns little about.



posted on Aug, 25 2006 @ 10:59 PM
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Originally posted by chrysoloras

PS Actually, there has been a great deal of research done on Manual Chrysoloras which the Kappa Sigma fraternity knowns little about.


I beg to differ on that point. There are whole groups of us who do nothing but research him.

-Steve

[edit on 25-8-2006 by The Big O]



posted on Aug, 26 2006 @ 02:10 AM
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As to the post about Epsilon Alpha, opr Epsilon Theta. I assume that you are a Kappa Alpha? Since I am not a member of the group, but have read all the histories of KA O. (KA How it became Southern for one) and the old Baird's Manuals, the name of the organization has always been stated as Epsilon Alpha, not Epsilon Theta. If you have information about this Epsilon Theta, I;d love to learn more. I am aware of EA having several chapters in Virginia, but have not been able to locate any information from the various school archives that give any significant information on EA.

If EA has been misslabled and it should be Epsilon Theta, that is fine. I would love to see the insignia of either.

Sincerely,
Chrysoloras



posted on Aug, 26 2006 @ 02:15 AM
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Originally posted by The Big O

Originally posted by chrysoloras

PS Actually, there has been a great deal of research done on Manual Chrysoloras which the Kappa Sigma fraternity knowns little about.


I beg to differ on that point. There are whole groups of us who do nothing but research him.

-Steve

[edit on 25-8-2006 by The Big O]


I know that there are a few KSigs who have done a little research on Chrysoloras, but as one of the Past Asst. Historians of Kappa Sigma myself, I know that the fraternity as a whole does not really care about the true facts of the life of Chrysolroas, especially the fact the he never once taught at Bologna as the order states. He only taught at Florence. He travled to many cities in Italy, including Bologna, and even made it to London, but he was never a professor at Bologna, and never started a society there. The society, if existed, was located first at Florence, then on to the other cities.

I have loads of information on Chrysoloras and other important European men in you are interested.

Sincerely,
Chrysoloras




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