It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NASA Picks Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover

page: 2
12
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage




But I think the difficulty of landing safely in a canyon is also a major factor. 


I 100% agree. I think it would be worth the challenge though.




posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:52 PM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

Nice. It looks like it froze over while it was rippling.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: Phage




But I think the difficulty of landing safely in a canyon is also a major factor. 


I 100% agree. I think it would be worth the challenge though.


The communications problems are not trivial.
mars.nasa.gov...

edit on 11/20/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: wildespace

Nice. It looks like it froze over while it was rippling.


Looks like a Sandworm nest to me.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:57 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage

originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: Phage




But I think the difficulty of landing safely in a canyon is also a major factor. 


I 100% agree. I think it would be worth the challenge though.


The communications problems are not trivial.


Neither were the early crossings of the Atlantic Ocean.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

That was a problem of logistics, not communications.
The rover is not autonomous.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 02:00 PM
link   

originally posted by: UpIsNowDown

Imagine being born off planet, being told about Earth, if you ever made it back, would it amaze or dissapoint


I'm 235 lbs. If I'd grown up on Mars, I would currently be 88 lbs. That would be like me going to a planet right now and weighing 382 pounds. While I consider myself to be on the athletic side, I'm not too sure I'd be able to walk very far at that weight. With that being said, it could be a disappointment.

Your Weight on Other Planets
edit on 20-11-2018 by LSU2018 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 02:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

That was a problem of logistics, not communications.
The rover is not autonomous.


I dunno, the postmen back then had a long swim.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 02:03 PM
link   

originally posted by: Archivalist
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

No the canyon walls are important. A small amount of interference close to you, is more detrimental than interference farther away.

It would increase the necessary transmit power, and without a line of sight to a satellite, you'd be screwed. Remember, both planets are both revolving around the sun, AND rotating on their own axis. You're asking something in a crack of one of these to have clear communication to the other?


What is the possibility of putting satellites in orbit around Mars and one in orbit between Mars and Earth?



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 02:08 PM
link   
a reply to: Kandinsky

Fun fact: I'd be 32 trillion pounds on a neutron star. Methinks I'd be crushed if I could stand the heat.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 02:10 PM
link   

originally posted by: Wide-Eyes

originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: wildespace

Nice. It looks like it froze over while it was rippling.


Looks like a Sandworm nest to me.


Maybe they can bring one back. Real life Tremors.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 02:17 PM
link   
a reply to: LSU2018

Time to send up the TNT loaded Rovers.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:24 PM
link   

originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: Kandinsky

Fun fact: I'd be 32 trillion pounds on a neutron star. Methinks I'd be crushed if I could stand the heat.


No shops on neutron stars, you'd be lucky to weigh even 10 trillion pounds.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: wildespace
Why do they never check out the canyons?
That would be my first target.

Bad idea for a solar powered vehicle. Besides, all the good ruins are on the shorelines near where the rivers connect, just like on Earth.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: Archivalist
I have a feeling we will make a scientific discovery capable of accelerating our proliferation into space.

Maybe when our robots achieve sentience. If that's what they want to do. When you can turn your power off and back on after a few thousand years in space, it doesn't matter how fast you travel. You got all the time in the universe. Not like us weak meatbags.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:51 PM
link   
a reply to: Blue Shift




Bad idea for a solar powered vehicle.

MSL isn't.
Nor will the next one be.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Blue Shift


Bad idea for a solar powered vehicle.

MSL isn't.
Nor will the next one be.

So they finally wised up.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:57 PM
link   
a reply to: Blue Shift

They would need to make intermediary stops for maintenance on intergalactic travel. Radiation damage and half life timing for their materials would be important factors, even with pseudo immortality.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:58 PM
link   

originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Blue Shift


Bad idea for a solar powered vehicle.

MSL isn't.
Nor will the next one be.

So they finally wised up.

Yes, a few years before the turn of the century.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 03:59 PM
link   
a reply to: Blue Shift

Opportunity was the last one (Mars) that relied so heavily on it.

Curiosity has an RTG variant afaik.



new topics

top topics



 
12
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join