It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

NASA Picks Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover

page: 1
12
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 09:54 AM
link   
The landing site for the next Mars rover, Mars 2020, has been chosen as Jezero Crater:


NASA has picked Jezero Crater on Mars, part of which is shown here, as the landing site for its Mars 2020 rover. This view shows ancient water-carved deltas, fans and lake basins in the region.


Jezero Crater will be a great place to do this work, Zurbuchen and other NASA officials said during today's news conference. Scientists believe an 820-foot-deep (250 meters) lake filled the crater at some point in the period from about 3.9 billion to 3.5 billion years ago. Jezero also sports a prominent river delta, where water flowing through this system deposited lots of sediment over the eons.

"A delta is extremely good at preserving biosignatures, [be they] evidence of life that might have existed in the lake water, or at the interface between the sediment and the lake water, or, possibly, things that lived in the headwaters region that were swept in by the river and deposited in the delta," Mars 2020 project scientist Ken Farley, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, said during today's news conference.


www.space.com...

Mars 2020 is a very exciting mission for me and no doubt for many others, and Jezero Crater looks like a very interesting place to explore. Imagine a real river flowing into a crater lake and teeming with microbes.




posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 10:04 AM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

Seems like it could be an interesting location , shame we have to wait another 2 years before we get wheels on the ground.

As the years go by I feel I have less waiting time to spend waiting .... I want it Now !!!!!!


In the meantime InSight Mars Lander lands next week.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 11:11 AM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

Why do they never check out the canyons?

That would be my first target.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 11:19 AM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

Great news. They need to find a way to drill into the lake to see if there's flowing water beneath. I've seen documentaries on the Science channel that tells about possible flowing water below the surface of one of Saturn's moons. I forgot the name of the moon they were talking about. If it's possible for a moon orbiting Saturn then surely it's possible for Mars.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 11:21 AM
link   

originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: wildespace

Why do they never check out the canyons?

That would be my first target.


They probably have, and they probably found some very interesting things that they decided not to share with Americans. I would LOVE to see all the their secret files.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 11:31 AM
link   
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

I guess it would be more dangerous getting the rover into a canyon plus radio communications could be disrupted , the fact that Jezero Crater has a fan-delta means that if Mars had life in the past they should find evidence of it there , the rover also has the capability to package samples ready for return to Earth later so it could well be a good destination.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 11:32 AM
link   

originally posted by: Wide-Eyes
a reply to: wildespace

Why do they never check out the canyons? That would be my first target.


I suspect the problem there is maintaining communications. The biggest canyon is deeper than the Grand Canyon. The comm link would only work if a satellite were directly overhead. Plus you would have a lot of difficulty getting around, unlike the flat surfaces (more or less) that current rovers have landed on.


They probably have, and they probably found some very interesting things that they decided not to share with Americans. I would LOVE to see all the their secret files.


Must be a secret landing then because there is no record of any landing in a canyon yet.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 12:08 PM
link   
The picture reminds me of delta fronts of Missisipi river:




As the Mississippi River enters the Gulf of Mexico, it loses energy and dumps its load of sediment that it has carried on its journey through the mid continent. This pile of sediment, or mud, accumulates over the years building up the delta front. As one part of the delta becomes clogged with sediment, the delta front will migrate in search of new areas to grow.

photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov...

Looks like that martian river was piling up a lot of sediment at its mouth, and the delta kept finding new channels.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 12:32 PM
link   
there appear to be small "ice caps" on mars, so why not land close to them?......am I missing something here?



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 12:38 PM
link   
a reply to: jimmyx

NASA sent the Phoenix lander there in 2008 , it surpassed it's mission goal but couldn't survive the Martian winter.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:20 PM
link   
Wow, check out this amazing simulated view of the delta in Jezero Crater: planetary.s3.amazonaws.com...




This stunningly detailed view of the ancient river delta exposed within Jezero crater on Mars was made from a photo and digital terrain model from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter HiRISE. The full-size image is 20k x 10k in size.

www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2018/jezero-landing-site-mars-2020-rover.html



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:28 PM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

I've read elsewhere about plans to take core samples from an area like this. Is this the same mission? The article I read discussed the better chances of discovering signatures of life a few feet beneath the sediments.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:36 PM
link   
a reply to: gortex




radio communications could be disrupted 


LMFAO. It's from Mars. The radio signals aren't being transmitted to another part of Mars. They're being beamed into the Solar System towards Earth.

Canyon walls are surely irrelevant?



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:39 PM
link   
Another great thread, go on us humans


Kind of got my mind spinning a little sideways, this may be a bit random, are we as a species really only looking at the Mars and Moon as viable (not just because of technology restrictions) but human reproduction restrictions, so deep space (long distance) missions are still dreams for the future, I maybe playing to much X Com 2 at the moment

Is any space agency looking at how to succesfully concieve and deliver a baby as part of space travel or are we still in our infancy


Imagine being born off planet, being told about Earth, if you ever made it back, would it amaze or dissapoint



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:43 PM
link   
a reply to: Wide-Eyes

No the canyon walls are important. A small amount of interference close to you, is more detrimental than interference farther away.

It would increase the necessary transmit power, and without a line of sight to a satellite, you'd be screwed. Remember, both planets are both revolving around the sun, AND rotating on their own axis. You're asking something in a crack of one of these to have clear communication to the other?



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:44 PM
link   
a reply to: Wide-Eyes


Canyon walls are surely irrelevant?
Absolutely. When the Earth is directly above the lander, the canyon walls would be irrelevant. Also when the orbiter, which is usually used as a relay, is directly above the canyon. No problem.


But I think the difficulty of landing safely in a canyon is also a major factor.

edit on 11/20/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: schuyler


Must be a secret landing then because there is no record of any landing in a canyon yet.


That's why I'd love to see their secret files


edit on 20-11-2018 by LSU2018 because: (no reason given)

edit on 20-11-2018 by LSU2018 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:47 PM
link   
a reply to: Archivalist

I understand that we have different orbits but "walls blocking the signals" sounds like a sh1tty excuse to me.



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:47 PM
link   
a reply to: UpIsNowDown



Is any space agency looking at how to succesfully concieve and deliver a baby as part of space travel or are we still in our infancy


There are academic papers going back for many years which address the ideas. There are still issues about maintaining bone density and muscle mass. Until those challenges, and many more, are overcome, there's no urgency to concentrate on babies being born in space.

Getting a person on Mars is a baby step in the scheme of things, but it's one giant leap for mankind too.

^^^ See what I did there?



posted on Nov, 20 2018 @ 01:48 PM
link   
a reply to: UpIsNowDown

Considering how bad conditions will be elsewhere? Earth would be a first heaven. Deep space travel isn't too far off imo. I have a feeling we will make a scientific discovery capable of accelerating our proliferation into space. (Involving Gauge Symmetry and Particle Mass Manipulation, looking at you, Muons.) So it might happen sooner than people expect.




top topics



 
12
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join