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Crisis of Civilization in Mexico 250,000 Dead. 37,400 Missing

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posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 03:08 PM
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What do you get when you cross extreme corruption and gun control. You get Mexico (and surely much of Central and South America).

This is why we will hold on to our god given rights of self defense because it can and will happen. Especially with the up tick in corruption and lawlessness we have seen in the last decade in the United States.

Thought provoking article to say the least. When people have to make casts of their teeth so they can be identified because they know criminals or criminal police are coming for them and they cannot defend themselves.


www.msn.com...




'It's a Crisis of Civilization in Mexico.' 250,000 Dead. 37,400 Missing.

Some 37,000 people in Mexico are categorized as “missing” by the government. The vast majority are believed to be dead, victims of the country’s spiraling violence that has claimed more than 250,000 lives since 2006. The country’s murder rate has more than doubled to 26 per 100,000 residents, five times the U.S. figure.

Because the missing aren’t counted as part of the country’s official murder tally, it is likely Mexico’s rate itself is higher.

The killing and the number of missing grow each year. Last year, 5,500 people disappeared, up from 3,400 in 2015. Mexico’s murders are up another 18% through September this year.

Victims’ families, mostly mothers, organize search parties, climbing down ravines or scouring trash dumps. Their technique is crude. Sometimes they hire laborers to hammer steel rods into the soil and haul them up to see if they smell like decomposition. Other times, they simply look for an exposed body part or shallow grave.

The sheer numbers of the disappeared now rival more famous cases of missing people in Latin American history.



And to make matters worse. Many of these are done by "agents of the state"




The main reason for not reporting is fear of reprisals by judicial authorities, criminals, and police, especially municipal police, who in many parts of Mexico collude with criminal gangs. The entire municipal police force in Acapulco was recently suspended on suspicion of cooperating with local gangs. Mexico’s navy now patrols the port city.

“In more than a third of all disappearances, the perpetrators are identified as agents of the state,” said Karina Ansolabehere, a researcher at México’s National Autonomous University, citing studies of some 1,500 disappearances in the border states of Nuevo León, Coahuila, and Tamaulipas. The studies draw from testimony by relatives of the victims who were able to identify the kidnappers.


edit on 18-11-2018 by infolurker because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 03:34 PM
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Wow. That is really bad and heartbreaking.

Perhaps if those caravans with the thousands upon thousands of capable, able bodied people-(especially the Males between the ages of 18-35 who are the majority), would only stand up for their own country and fight to get rid of all of the lawlessness like countless other citizens of other countries including the USA have done in the past, we wouldn't be hearing these kinds of stories.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

It's just horrific the conditions that folks are living in/with.

I read a lot of blogs and social media regarding missing people and it seems as if yesterday (?) something came across about a teacher hiking in Mexico and had been found murdered.

I don't know if I can find it again and I was looking up other things at the time so I didn't bookmark.
Dangerous times there, for sure.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: infolurker

How can we know they're missing?
Maybe they snuck across the border and are now living in California?



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 03:48 PM
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That is nothing the uk , that quiet little island with gun control has 250.000 people go missing a year , every year

Maybe they are being harvested for body parts by actors unknown



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: infolurker
What do you get when you cross extreme corruption and gun control. You get Mexico...


You got that backwards.

It should be, what do you get when you have the wealthiest country in the world, which has the largest illegal drug consumption rate in the in the world... which also shares a border with a developing nation?




You get the Mexican drug wars!



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 03:58 PM
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originally posted by: stonerwilliam
That is nothing the uk , that quiet little island with gun control has 250.000 people go missing a year , every year

Maybe they are being harvested for body parts by actors unknown


The number of murders in Mexico is almost twice that of the entire US.
Those missing figures are troubling, I'm sure in the UK many immigrants go back home expecting to return and don't for some reason, maybe hoping to get receiving benefits while gone. Many more are no doubt young girls, a problem that needs addressing badly.
edit on 18-11-2018 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

So Mexico should want to build a wall

Or just legalize drugs



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: infolurker
What do you get when you cross extreme corruption and gun control. You get Mexico (and surely much of Central and South America).

This is why we will hold on to our god given rights of self defense because it can and will happen. Especially with the up tick in corruption and lawlessness we have seen in the last decade in the United States.

Thought provoking article to say the least. When people have to make casts of their teeth so they can be identified because they know criminals or criminal police are coming for them and they cannot defend themselves.


www.msn.com...




'It's a Crisis of Civilization in Mexico.' 250,000 Dead. 37,400 Missing.

Some 37,000 people in Mexico are categorized as “missing” by the government. The vast majority are believed to be dead, victims of the country’s spiraling violence that has claimed more than 250,000 lives since 2006. The country’s murder rate has more than doubled to 26 per 100,000 residents, five times the U.S. figure.

Because the missing aren’t counted as part of the country’s official murder tally, it is likely Mexico’s rate itself is higher.

The killing and the number of missing grow each year. Last year, 5,500 people disappeared, up from 3,400 in 2015. Mexico’s murders are up another 18% through September this year.

Victims’ families, mostly mothers, organize search parties, climbing down ravines or scouring trash dumps. Their technique is crude. Sometimes they hire laborers to hammer steel rods into the soil and haul them up to see if they smell like decomposition. Other times, they simply look for an exposed body part or shallow grave.

The sheer numbers of the disappeared now rival more famous cases of missing people in Latin American history.



And to make matters worse. Many of these are done by "agents of the state"




The main reason for not reporting is fear of reprisals by judicial authorities, criminals, and police, especially municipal police, who in many parts of Mexico collude with criminal gangs. The entire municipal police force in Acapulco was recently suspended on suspicion of cooperating with local gangs. Mexico’s navy now patrols the port city.

“In more than a third of all disappearances, the perpetrators are identified as agents of the state,” said Karina Ansolabehere, a researcher at México’s National Autonomous University, citing studies of some 1,500 disappearances in the border states of Nuevo León, Coahuila, and Tamaulipas. The studies draw from testimony by relatives of the victims who were able to identify the kidnappers.



SnF

I'm shocked that only a few have read this OP.
Ten years ago, this would have generated more interest. Sad to see the de evolution.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:23 PM
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originally posted by: SocratesJohnson
a reply to: Subaeruginosa

So Mexico should want to build a wall

Or just legalize drugs


I thought they just did legalize pot? I very could be mistaken though.
As for all the other drugs I doubt that will ever happen.

But man that article was hard to read. Very sad indeed.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:24 PM
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Makes you really grateful for America, doesn't it.

Criminal gangs die here.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:26 PM
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originally posted by: SocratesJohnson
a reply to: Subaeruginosa

So Mexico should want to build a wall

Or just legalize drugs


I really don't think a wall is going to be a deterrent on a nearly half a trillion dollar industry... I doubt legalizing drugs in Mexico would have much effect either, since they would still have to illegally import their product into the US.

The bloody Mexican drug war would just go on as normal.

Seems like its entirely in the US governments hands to end this mess. Legalizing & regulating drugs in the US is the only way to stabilize this situation... imo



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:29 PM
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Mexico is a mess. All that and remember the murdered woman epidemic in Mexico is still going on.
Real sad.
Though, the US has not escaped the human madness going on on our planet, with its mass murder a week.
And we have Chicago and many other problems.
Somehow the human species needs to look at itself and try to eliminate these problems of extreme violence; the question is how we do that
It’s a philosophical, moral, and spiritual question mostly rather than a police matter.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: Inconceivable
Wow. That is really bad and heartbreaking.

Perhaps if those caravans with the thousands upon thousands of capable, able bodied people-(especially the Males between the ages of 18-35 who are the majority), would only stand up for their own country and fight to get rid of all of the lawlessness like countless other citizens of other countries including the USA have done in the past, we wouldn't be hearing these kinds of stories.


Would help if they were not using sticks against guns.




posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:38 PM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa

originally posted by: infolurker
What do you get when you cross extreme corruption and gun control. You get Mexico...


You got that backwards.

It should be, what do you get when you have the wealthiest country in the world, which has the largest illegal drug consumption rate in the in the world... which also shares a border with a developing nation?




You get the Mexican drug wars!




Don’t blame this on the US. Mexico has been a haven for lawlessness for decades. The people need to be able to defend themselves. In my opinion 250,000 probably isn’t a drop in the bucket. A lot of Mexico is very rural. The police are on the take as well as public officials.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:43 PM
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originally posted by: watchitburn
a reply to: infolurker

How can we know they're missing?
Maybe they snuck across the border and are now living in California?


Most are probably dead. Life is very cheap south of the border. I almost bought a business in Ply del Carman, until I found out that I would be expected to sell drugs from behind the bar and I would have no choice.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:48 PM
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Um. It's totally legal to have guns in your house in Mexico. It's in their constitution. There's just strict regulations on who can have them on the street. There are many, many, many other countries with much stricter gun laws than Mexico, and they dont have this problem.



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: Asktheanimals

It is shocking for people who live in quiet countries to see what they consider a quiet civil place to have more deaths per month than some war torn hell hole as is the case with Rio in Brazil and Chicago in the USA .

I can remember reading the way the police collect data on this made the 250.000 per year a low figure

nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk...

And the number has stayed pretty even with all the foreign people in the country , who nobody is going to miss if they do not turn up for work etc , great time to harvest humans with all the moving about they do .

When you add all those numbers up world wide it makes interesting reading , what nobody cares about is There were 23,137 deaths between December 2017 and March 2018, according to the National Records in a population of 5,7 million where i live www.bbc.co.uk...




posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: Subaeruginosa

originally posted by: SocratesJohnson
a reply to: Subaeruginosa

So Mexico should want to build a wall

Or just legalize drugs


I really don't think a wall is going to be a deterrent on a nearly half a trillion dollar industry... I doubt legalizing drugs in Mexico would have much effect either, since they would still have to illegally import their product into the US.

The bloody Mexican drug war would just go on as normal.

Seems like its entirely in the US governments hands to end this mess. Legalizing & regulating drugs in the US is the only way to stabilize this situation... imo


Too late.

The cartels have reached a point where they own legitimate businesses and operations, providing jobs to locals.
They also don't deal strictly in drugs anymore, so its a lame argument. Should we legalize human trafficking?



posted on Nov, 18 2018 @ 04:58 PM
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Yep, the law abiding citizens in Mexico can’t have guns outside their homes, but the cartel members and the on the cartel payroll law enforcement agencies run free with them. Sure is a fair fight. Gun grabbers ensure the law abiding citizens are at a disadvantage once again. Seems like the gun grabbers just can’t seem to allow law abiding folks to defend themselves against the criminal elements...anywhere.




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