It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Argentina’s missing sub with 44 crew on board has been located on the bottom of the ocean

page: 2
22
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:06 AM
link   
I wonder if I have stumble onto a PATTERN.

Crew of 44= President 44?

TR = Trump retired/removed?

1700 = 1700 Pennsylvania Ave. Mills building?

12 months = November or December?

San Juan sub sunken= San Juan, Puerto Rico (left to it's own recovery?)

800 - 8:00 am/pm?

Am I hitting too many possibilities? Or, maybe I'm too PARANOID (that's two of them).
It's best to be forewarned and prepared.




posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:11 AM
link   
a reply to: Yule C Mann

Ahh, numerology!


Its for the birds really. LoL



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:32 AM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58
Human error? Should the captain have manually closed the snorkel an run on batteries under storm conditions. Seems to have been the prudent thing to do.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:33 AM
link   
a reply to: Yule C Mann




Or, maybe I'm too PARANOID


Maybe?



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:34 AM
link   
By now you would think they would have individual little sea pods to escape like Starship Enterprise!



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:37 AM
link   
a reply to: SeaWorthy

Could be done indeed via detachable escape section of the craft, but the concern would cost, nevermind the problems associated with depth and pressure which could weaken the boat's superstructure.

Nothing that could not be solved all the same.
edit on 17-11-2018 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:40 AM
link   
doctrorine flaws - not design flaws = the problem in many cases

the TR 1700s were designed // built by thyysen [ germany ] - and got midlife updates in brazil

the origional desin - and uopgrades - were all very well established tech - that are swervibg without incident in manyy navies world wide

the loss - was not the san juans first cruise - post update

things can always go wrong - but drew failings and maintenence lapses - are often contributory



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 01:28 PM
link   
Here's a report from the BBC that may be of interest...

BB Report


An Argentine submarine which vanished a year ago with 44 crew on board imploded, the Argentine navy has confirmed after the wreck was found.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 01:37 PM
link   
a reply to: MindBodySpiritComplex

Scary to read. In March after basic training my youngest son is starting training in the Navy's nuclear engineering program and then he's obliged to serve four years after the two years of school. Those years will mostly be on board a nuclear submarine somewhere out there in the deep blue....

Prayers for the lost souls and thoughts for their famalies.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 01:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: Yule C Mann
I wonder if I have stumble onto a PATTERN.

Crew of 44= President 44?

TR = Trump retired/removed?

1700 = 1700 Pennsylvania Ave. Mills building?

12 months = November or December?

San Juan sub sunken= San Juan, Puerto Rico (left to it's own recovery?)

800 - 8:00 am/pm?

Am I hitting too many possibilities? Or, maybe I'm too PARANOID (that's two of them).
It's best to be forewarned and prepared.



The number of posts you have made up to now: 241
Stars you have had till now : 204
Your Karma score: 13
Your Time Reference: 8 pm
your ATS Score: 2

241-204 = 37

[Your post count] - [Your stars] + [Your karma score] - [Your time reference] + [Your ATS score]
37 + 13 - 8 + 2 = 44




I would say you are neither hitting on something or paranoid but more of a coincidence. the thing about numbers is you can play with them to get what you want. Its a big world out there and numbers can repeat.

In regards to the Sub that really sucks and my deepest condolences to the family.
edit on 031130America/ChicagoSat, 17 Nov 2018 14:03:51 -0600000000p3042 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 02:14 PM
link   
Another problem with seawater in the batteries is the generation of chlorine and hydrogen. Imagine a fire in a space that is filled with chlorine which must be isolated from the rest of the sub. How does one fight that? Emergency surfacing for starters would be my guess.

Implosion is a nasty way to go but it is fast. As the hull undergoes collapse with bulkheads failing sequentially, the air is compressed from one atmosphere to the pressure at depth. 3000 feet is roughly 100 atmospheres, so imagine being inside the cylinder of a diesel engine with a 100:1 compression ratio. Nasty.
edit on 11/17/2018 by pteridine because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 05:25 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: MindBodySpiritComplex

Scary to read. In March after basic training my youngest son is starting training in the Navy's nuclear engineering program and then he's obliged to serve four years after the two years of school. Those years will mostly be on board a nuclear submarine somewhere out there in the deep blue....


Unless he's already "guaranteed" subs he could be aboard a carrier. The nuke departments aboard carriers are composed of several hundred sailors. I was a "nuke" Machinist Mate in the seventies.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 05:30 PM
link   
Don't submarines carry the equivalent of "black boxes"? If not, they should.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 05:43 PM
link   
a reply to: andy06shake

Why don't they build all ventilation points behind their own mini hatches? It's probably noisier and more prone to mechanical failure but worth it in terms of survivability if this is a common problem.


That or just route all ventilation points behind one or two areas with more durable hatches that can also be manually opened and closed in an emergency.

Like a digestive system. One area for toots. One area for intake. Everywhere else is closed by pressure differences. It's all one tube though in essence.
edit on 11 17 2018 by tadaman because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 09:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

i have to give submariners a lot of credit because i don't think i could do that job. one thing goes really wrong and your most likely SOL.

at least they get to come home and be buried by their families and not stuck in a cold dark abyss for eternity

will be interesting to hear what caused the malfunction



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 09:27 PM
link   
a reply to: penroc3

I've worked with a few sub guys over the years. They never gave out much detail, but some of the, "So there we were, in the middle of transit" stories were insane.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 10:18 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

iv watched a bunch of good documentaries on saturation diving as well as the ones on the kursk and the USS Thresher.

the russians refused help for so long from british saturation divers that there was no one to save and the people in charge of the navy lied to all the families and this poor mother called them on their bs and some agent stepped next to her and sedated her



they did however finally take the help
edit on 17-11-2018 by penroc3 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 10:33 PM
link   
THe only reason to snorkel are in testing, and when you want to remain covert while charging the batteries so you could eventually go completely submerged. The top of the boat is less than 20ft from the surface when snorkeling, so if there was a problem, it should have been relatively easy to surface immediately. Something else is afoot in the explanations that we are not being told.
edit on 17-11-2018 by charlyv because: s



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 10:40 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

They were in the middle of a storm at the time. They were staying below the swells while submerged, and recharging their batteries.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 10:41 PM
link   
a reply to: penroc3

From that I've read, even if they accepted help immediately, the odds of them having rescued anyone were pretty slim. They estimated the survivors were only alive about 8 hours or so.




top topics



 
22
<< 1    3 >>

log in

join