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Trump and prison reform

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posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 07:54 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

I live in a state which eliminated mandatory sentencing, judges aren't that bright to begin with and, as predicted, manage to become even dimmer when they hold additional responsibilities in their hands. This AK Senate Bill 91 has been an unmitigated disaster, turning an already crime plagued city (it is a state bill, but Anchorage is where everything happens here... rural Alaska takes care of it's own issues where crime is concerned and does so quite efficiently) into a criminal playground. Mandatory sentencing at least kept *most* baseheads, thugs, and meth animals from brazenly stealing everything in sight and blatantly assaulting anyone they thought looked like a mark.




posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 08:13 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04
a reply to: PhyllidaDavenport

Many will never give him any credit. I don't like Trump the person, but Trump the president has done a great job.

God damn OR, that's an amazing way of putting it. You've defined my whole thoughts on Trump since the first debates. Thank you for that. You put into words what I couldn't for nearly 3 years.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6

Then it's time to get better judges, is it not?

What you're doing, although I doubt you realize it, is excusing the bad behavior of one group (judges) in order to not excuse the bad behavior of another group (criminals). Mandatory sentencing does take more criminals off the streets when the judges won't do their jobs, but it also invariably results in lopsided sentencing. Bad judges will often give light sentences to crimes which were worse than the ones they are required to give minimum sentences to.

And someone earlier pointed out that 'sexual offender' can and often does apply to a barely 18 year old boy dating a girl about to turn 17. That boy can get many years in prison, and be condemned to the sexual offenders list for life, while someone who stole a car and beat up the driver plea deals to grand theft auto and gets a light sentence because that doesn't carry minimum sentencing.

It's the duty of the citizens to select good people as their leaders, or it is their role to suffer the consequences from not doing so. It sucks sometimes, especially when we have allowed the country to get in the shape it is in, but it is a law of nature that cannot be denied forever.

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 09:00 PM
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a reply to: TheRedneck

I am unmoved.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: Fools

Trump gained my respect today.

We should watch this closely and make sure it happens in the way it's being presented.

Make sure it's not just lip serves.


I'm going to be hopeful and believe this is true and #ing awesome.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 09:11 PM
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Left has been all about prison reform.

I told you guys once the left got some power back by gaining the house you would see trump moving to a more left stance.


I think a more moderate trump would be great for all of us.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 09:15 PM
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a reply to: Lumenari

The left want prison reform.

If they complain about anything it will be that this doesn't go far enough.


Or they will treat it as a to good to be true, I'll believe it when it happens kinda thing. Can't blame anyone for being skeptical.

I can only speak for the people on the left that I know personally of course.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: burdman30ott6



turning an already crime plagued city.... into a criminal playground.

Can you link us to the crime stats of your city please.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 10:41 PM
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a reply to: scraedtosleep

www.city-data.com...

I can tell you another side of AK Senate Bill 91, the Anchorage Police don't even bother arresting most misdemeanor offenders because they'll enter the revolving door, receive zero prosecution, and walk right back out to the street and be stealing, destroying, or pushing before nightfall again. The system of not applying minimum punishment standards has failed Alaska.

www.usatoday.com...
Notice that Anchorage has the 2nd highest violent crime rate of any US metro area.

35 homicides in 2017, APD stopped telling us the numbers this year, but based on the news I'll eat my hat if we're not well above last year's number. Hell, they've had 3 homicides just in the past week that the news has reported on, possibly 4 depending on a hit and run investigation that left a woman dead.

edit on 14-11-2018 by burdman30ott6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 11:50 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: TheRedneck

I live in a state which eliminated mandatory sentencing, judges aren't that bright to begin with and, as predicted, manage to become even dimmer when they hold additional responsibilities in their hands. This AK Senate Bill 91 has been an unmitigated disaster, turning an already crime plagued city (it is a state bill, but Anchorage is where everything happens here... rural Alaska takes care of it's own issues where crime is concerned and does so quite efficiently) into a criminal playground. Mandatory sentencing at least kept *most* baseheads, thugs, and meth animals from brazenly stealing everything in sight and blatantly assaulting anyone they thought looked like a mark.


I appreciate your thoughts on this. It is true that sometimes there are people that never learn. I am not sure about Alaska at all, but in Missouri (mainly the cities) this is a huge problem. And I paid attention in the 1980's, 90's aughts, and 2010's. It has only made things worse, more violent and more unbelievable.

To me it is very similar to the gangsters in the 1920's. When the government tries to legislate morality - it always makes things worse. I am a bit intoxicated at the moment and I want to go on... I will make some points:
1. Jail sucks and longterm jail sucks even more
2. Most people in jail are young men.
3. A good percentage of them are black.
4. They look around and they see - everything negative about humanity - AND THEY LEARN.
5. Ok #, this can go on and on - but the point of this is to keep NON violent criminals out of prison for extended periods of time where they LEARN worse behavior.
6. Everyone thinks that land is sacred or magic. it isnt, families are. Families are where everything is brewed up and spit out.
7. I have more
8. Wonderful vodka...GN
edit on 14-11-2018 by Fools because: .



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 12:59 AM
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I can't believe the journalist at the end attacking the president with hard core questions that had no business being ask at this press conference.
They are scumbags that are the lowest of the animal chain. Always attacking the President of the United States of America.
I wonder if President Obama ever would put up with this type of barbaric act from journalist?



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
I disagree with him on this. The minimum sentencing laws needed to be expanded and increased, not reduced simply because too many people can't seem to behave themselves.


How is Throwing people in prison for long sentences for no violent, non theft related crimes ever a good thing?

Plus it has NEVER worked.

Why keep doing something that doesnt work?



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 10:47 AM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6


www.usatoday.com...
Notice that Anchorage has the 2nd highest violent crime rate of any US metro area.

3


Violent crime is different.

Throw away the key or string em up.

The problem is most prisoners are non violent.



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 11:09 AM
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Many criminal justice reformers don’t think the Collins bill goes far enough. Like Nolan, they want a bill that pares back federal mandatory minimum sentences that too often put away low- and mid-level offenders for decades, even life. Even under Trump, they won’t settle for inmate-centered reform only. For example, Eric Sterling, who founded the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation to correct excesses in federal drug laws that he helped write as a Senate aide in the 1980s, thinks Kushner and Nolan have set too low a bar. “A traditional Washington approach is to say, always take half a loaf rather than no loaf,” said Sterling. In this case, “conceptually it doesn’t make sense to just try fix problems with prisons when you’re not addressing the flows of people coming into prison.”


spectator.org...

It looks like the cart may have been put before the horse here.



posted on Nov, 17 2018 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight



Many criminal justice reformers don’t think the Collins bill goes far enough. Like Nolan, they want a bill that pares back federal mandatory minimum sentences that too often put away low- and mid-level offenders for decades, even life. Even under Trump, they won’t settle for inmate-centered reform only. For example, Eric Sterling, who founded the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation to correct excesses in federal drug laws that he helped write as a Senate aide in the 1980s, thinks Kushner and Nolan have set too low a bar. “A traditional Washington approach is to say, always take half a loaf rather than no loaf,” said Sterling. In this case, “conceptually it doesn’t make sense to just try fix problems with prisons when you’re not addressing the flows of people coming into prison.”


spectator.org...

It looks like the cart may have been put before the horse here.


How so, I read the entire article you linked and it appears that the article in total supports the effort. And yet you pick the one paragraph that is negative or semi negative about it.

Getting anything changed to less punitive on the federal level of law enforcement is always a good thing. They have way too much ability to ruin peoples lives and families for next to no good reason other than they can. That is not a good thing.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 08:16 AM
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originally posted by: Fools

originally posted by: InTheLight



Many criminal justice reformers don’t think the Collins bill goes far enough. Like Nolan, they want a bill that pares back federal mandatory minimum sentences that too often put away low- and mid-level offenders for decades, even life. Even under Trump, they won’t settle for inmate-centered reform only. For example, Eric Sterling, who founded the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation to correct excesses in federal drug laws that he helped write as a Senate aide in the 1980s, thinks Kushner and Nolan have set too low a bar. “A traditional Washington approach is to say, always take half a loaf rather than no loaf,” said Sterling. In this case, “conceptually it doesn’t make sense to just try fix problems with prisons when you’re not addressing the flows of people coming into prison.”


spectator.org...

It looks like the cart may have been put before the horse here.


How so, I read the entire article you linked and it appears that the article in total supports the effort. And yet you pick the one paragraph that is negative or semi negative about it.

Getting anything changed to less punitive on the federal level of law enforcement is always a good thing. They have way too much ability to ruin peoples lives and families for next to no good reason other than they can. That is not a good thing.


The one idea from that article -



“conceptually it doesn’t make sense to just try fix problems with prisons when you’re not addressing the flows of people coming into prison.”


- is what your government should ALSO be tackling, or have started tackling long ago, and that would be nipping criminality in the bud (youth programs) before it gets this far.

I think James LeBron's 'I Promise School' is an attempt that addresses some of the causes/situations that may help to keep people out of prison by changing the life direction of vulnerable children.

What is your government administration doing to address these vulnerable children?

www.sportingnews.com... 50x8sdp

lebronjamesfamilyfoundation.org...



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 09:03 AM
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originally posted by: CynConcepts
a reply to: OccamsRazor04

I agree that REAL Pedophiles cannot help themselves...what needs to be corrected though is an 18 yr old being called a pedophile because his girlfriend is 16 years old and the parents do not like him...or he broke up and the girl/parents seek vengeance.

I have been raped by real Pedophiles and one of my daughters too...there is a big difference that current law does not take into account. Young men should not be punished as a pedophile because of dating someone close to their age. They are not mentally Ill.

Pedophiles are mentally ill and there is an obvious distinction. They will always be mentally deficient. Young male adults are mentally sound and as they age...so will their chosen sexual partners.


I totally agree with you. I have seen decent young guys go to prison for having consenual sex with a girl just shy of the "legal" age. After they get out they can't move back in with their family because there are still underage siblings in the house. That is absolute insanity.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 10:35 AM
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originally posted by: InTheLight

originally posted by: Fools

originally posted by: InTheLight



Many criminal justice reformers don’t think the Collins bill goes far enough. Like Nolan, they want a bill that pares back federal mandatory minimum sentences that too often put away low- and mid-level offenders for decades, even life. Even under Trump, they won’t settle for inmate-centered reform only. For example, Eric Sterling, who founded the Criminal Justice Policy Foundation to correct excesses in federal drug laws that he helped write as a Senate aide in the 1980s, thinks Kushner and Nolan have set too low a bar. “A traditional Washington approach is to say, always take half a loaf rather than no loaf,” said Sterling. In this case, “conceptually it doesn’t make sense to just try fix problems with prisons when you’re not addressing the flows of people coming into prison.”


spectator.org...

It looks like the cart may have been put before the horse here.


How so, I read the entire article you linked and it appears that the article in total supports the effort. And yet you pick the one paragraph that is negative or semi negative about it.

Getting anything changed to less punitive on the federal level of law enforcement is always a good thing. They have way too much ability to ruin peoples lives and families for next to no good reason other than they can. That is not a good thing.


The one idea from that article -



“conceptually it doesn’t make sense to just try fix problems with prisons when you’re not addressing the flows of people coming into prison.”


- is what your government should ALSO be tackling, or have started tackling long ago, and that would be nipping criminality in the bud (youth programs) before it gets this far.

I think James LeBron's 'I Promise School' is an attempt that addresses some of the causes/situations that may help to keep people out of prison by changing the life direction of vulnerable children.

What is your government administration doing to address these vulnerable children?

www.sportingnews.com... 50x8sdp

lebronjamesfamilyfoundation.org...



I have many ideas that would help the black population and crime. One would be to reach out to whatever pop stars in the black world (sports music, whatever) and try to sell them on the importance of family. Try to sell them on the importance of fatherhood. Second part is to reverse welfare policy back to what it was before Obama. Third part is to enforce the idea of what good citizenship means in grade school, middle school and high school. Fourth part is get cops back on beats in the inner city if possible.



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 10:39 AM
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originally posted by: Fools
Man Trump is a good president.



Why wasn't this done before now?




The new legislation would eliminate "stacking" provisions that result in offenders serving consecutive sentences for crimes committed using firearms; shorten mandatory minimum sentences, including reverting life imprisonment to a 25-year minimum for those convicted under the "three strikes" provision; and expand the "drug safety valve" to reduce the number of nonviolent drug offenders receiving mandatory minimum sentences.


Just so you dont have to look. Do we know who made all these mandatory sentences? I know. It's a quiz.

was this even reported?
clearly this is not as important as calling a spec op guy a clinton and obama backer!



posted on Nov, 19 2018 @ 12:19 PM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

I don't mind it for some crimes. It should be mandatory life for pedophiles who rape kids, or men who rape women (not where the woman regrets it later, I mean real rape).


I never really understood it for anything. Its like people suggest that a judge would give a ped only 6 months if he didn't have a mandatory sentence. I think it hurts way more than those who deserve it too. Take the three strikes...a person gets life for stealing a candy bar on their third strike, or smoke pot on a third strike...

We could remove 40% of those in jail and work to get them back into society.



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