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Only 12,000 Years Ago A Meteor Impact Created A 19 Miles Wide Crater In Greenland

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posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: Middleoftheroad



Not mentioned in this article: It is generally agreed that the last ice age ended about 12,000 years ago - although some claim it hasn't actually ended yet.


So you think the two events are correlated? I'd assume an impact of that size would throw a lot of debris in our atmosphere and cause our planet to cool down even more.


If it hit the ice sheet, caused massive heating of the ice and chucking hot water all over the place, that would be an interesting effect. A nuclear winter is caused by dust in the stratosphere.




posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 06:30 PM
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a reply to: stormcell


We emphasize that even this broad age estimate remains uncertain and that further investigation of the age of the Hiawatha impact crater is necessary. Regardless of its exact age, based on the size of the Hiawatha impact crater, this impact very likely had significant environmental consequences in the Northern Hemisphere and possibly globally (35).


But, as yet, no ejecta has been found in Greenland. This complicates aging the impact. That's why there is such a wide range.

And they can't tell whether or not there was an ice sheet there at the time.

Because it is not yet known whether the Greenland Ice Sheet covered this region at the time of the impact, or its thickness at that time or the impact angle, our estimates of impactor size, initial crater size, impact melt volume, and ejecta thickness and extent should be considered preliminary.



advances.sciencemag.org...
edit on 11/14/2018 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 06:48 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: stormcell


We emphasize that even this broad age estimate remains uncertain and that further investigation of the age of the Hiawatha impact crater is necessary. Regardless of its exact age, based on the size of the Hiawatha impact crater, this impact very likely had significant environmental consequences in the Northern Hemisphere and possibly globally (35).


But, as yet, no ejecta has been found in Greenland. This complicates aging the impact. That's why there is such a wide range.

And they can't tell whether or not there was an ice sheet there at the time.

Because it is not yet known whether the Greenland Ice Sheet covered this region at the time of the impact, or its thickness at that time or the impact angle, our estimates of impactor size, initial crater size, impact melt volume, and ejecta thickness and extent should be considered preliminary.



advances.sciencemag.org...
Now that's the Phage we've been waiting for.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 07:09 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: watchitburn
I don't think people in India would see the impact of a meteor in Greenland.

They would if the sea level rose 400 feet or so where they built their major cities.


As in Dwarka?



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 07:16 PM
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Whelp, it does support the Hancock, Carlson, etc., etc., etc., theories that were just waiting for a smoking gun/crater to confirm it all. Lacking a large crater like this one, they were supposing a Tunguska like air-burst, but now? Heh.

I've judged that those fellows putting together ubiquitous flood and lost golden age "myths" were not completely wacky, despite some conclusion jumping and lots o speculation. If the date gets nailed down and the data confirms the hypothesis, then those guys will get to bask in some I-told-you-so.

The downside is us getting smacked into the stone age, or worse, every so often, tho...



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 07:25 PM
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originally posted by: MissSmartypants

originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: stormcell


We emphasize that even this broad age estimate remains uncertain and that further investigation of the age of the Hiawatha impact crater is necessary. Regardless of its exact age, based on the size of the Hiawatha impact crater, this impact very likely had significant environmental consequences in the Northern Hemisphere and possibly globally (35).


But, as yet, no ejecta has been found in Greenland. This complicates aging the impact. That's why there is such a wide range.

And they can't tell whether or not there was an ice sheet there at the time.

Because it is not yet known whether the Greenland Ice Sheet covered this region at the time of the impact, or its thickness at that time or the impact angle, our estimates of impactor size, initial crater size, impact melt volume, and ejecta thickness and extent should be considered preliminary.



advances.sciencemag.org...
Now that's the Phage we've been waiting for.


Yes, somebody has to read the link.




posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 08:33 PM
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Wow! What a huge discovery. If this is correct it sure does change the way we think about the end of the Ice Age. All those large mammal deaths in the northerly latitudes happening so suddenly and so on ... sure would 'splain a lot of stuff. I wonder how much it affected the axis of the earth's rotation.

We heard it first on ATS! Bravo.



posted on Nov, 14 2018 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: Trueman

Now THAT is the kind of rabbit hole I come here for.

To your health.



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 03:53 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Ejecta is mentioned in the research article that is linked in the article. a few grains...

A large impact crater beneath Hiawatha Glacier in northwest Greenland

The association of shocked quartz grains mantled by carbonaceous material, microbreccias with amorphous carbonaceous matrix, and glasses with a range of mineral-like compositions is highly unusual for confirmed impact structures, and we are unaware of any directly comparable grain assemblages from these structures. The large morphological and compositional variety of the HW21-2016 grains is unlikely to stem from a homogenized melt sheet on a crater floor. Rather, it probably represents components of the uppermost, unlithified part of an impact structure, and at least a few grains are considered likely to be ejecta (e.g., Fig. 3, G and H).


And this BBC article claims the ejecta could be transported elsewhere:

Greenland ice sheet hides huge 'impact crater'

The other head-scratcher is the absence in the vicinity of the Hiawatha site of any rocky material that would have been ejected outwards from the crater on impact.

Prof Kjær says these missing signatures might be explained by a very shallow angle of impact that took most of the ejecta to the north. And if the fall-out area was covered in ice, it's possible any debris was later transported away.


Wayne Herschel released a video last week where this impact plays a big role:



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 05:00 AM
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originally posted by: Fools
a reply to: MindBodySpiritComplex

Somewhere soon, Graham Hancock will read this and get a huge boner.


And so he should. The man is a genius and it's looking like he'll live long enough to see his theories accepted as fact.

Well done Graham Hancock and Randall Carlson.



posted on Nov, 15 2018 @ 05:17 AM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Middleoftheroad
So you think the two events are correlated? I'd assume an impact of that size would throw a lot of debris in our atmosphere and cause our planet to cool down even more.

Randall Carlson suggests there were two impacts, and probably more, created by the fragmentation of the Comet Encke. The first one (12,900 years ago) caused huge fires worldwide, throwing dust and ash into the air which halted and reversed the warming which was starting just before the Younger Dryas. The second event (11,600 years ago) was an airburst over the North American ice sheet that threw up more water vapor than ash, stimulating a greenhouse effect and faster warming. Supposedly it was the second one that wiped out Atlantis and fatally crippled the newly-emerged "advanced" global civilization that knew about stuff like astronomy/astrology, farming, law, and building stuff using big-ass rocks. Supposedly.

Sometime in late October, apparently when we pass through the Taurid meteor stream agai

Pn, which is why various cultures still have a "Day of the Dead" around that time. Also, of course, because it's fall.


Pardon my drunken stuper

But then that would make sense.......they would star migrating south again, running into "us" and being wiped out by hunting..along with other species on our route to find food.......

I know im not the first to think of it but.......that all makes sense.....our co-mingling in our transition........



posted on Nov, 23 2018 @ 07:07 AM
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The 318 mile wide Pallas asteroid was discovered in 1802.

Sixty years after Pallas’s discovery, on the evenings of December 10-12, 1862, observers in England and the United States spotted a meteor shower that appeared to come from a point (radiant) in the constellation Gemini(Geminids).

In 1983, astronomers discovered an NEA that was later named 3200 Phaethon.

Astronomers have long known that there are areas in the asteroid belt — called Kirkwood gaps after the astronomer who first noticed them — that are almost completely empty of objects. These regions, said Todorović, have been cleared out by orbital resonances moving small bodies away.

By studying the Kirkwood gaps it was conjectured that the the Pallas asteroid was the original source of the Geminids meteor shower.

This is on topic since we are fast approaching the December shower activity.

extra credit..
Anyone see a historical link between the Battle of Fredericksburg and the tears of St Lawrence?



posted on Nov, 23 2018 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: Moravec

I am going to re-post the video you have brought over on the Richat thread.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

Thank you this guy makes some very interesting observation's.



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