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Time for new building codes in California

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posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 11:11 AM
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Time for new building codes in fire prone areas?

So, I live in California less than an hour from the latest fires that are on the news.

I'm horrified by the destruction and loss of life. My heart goes out to all of those people.

I see on the news people talking about rebuilding. I can understand the desire to rebuild, but is there a better way not just to build your house, but rebuild the community. So I think that it's time to take a serious look at building codes in disaster prone areas.

It seems to me, that the building codes in fire prone areas, need to be reviewed and updated to prevent the kind of catastrophe that we have just witnessed. If you rebuild the cities and houses just as they were, won't the catastrophe happen again?

So, the community needs to set up new building standards to reduce the ability of fire to spread. You can start with houses. No more flammable materials to be used in construction. Steel framing covered with stucco would be a lot harder to start burning then wood siding and a shake roof. That beautiful redwood deck that has been sitting in the sun for a decade is just kindling for the next fire. So, I think that building codes for houses need to be updated or completely revamped.

Fire suppression systems inside and outside should be required.

At the community level, planners need to look at housing density, lot setbacks and water supplies to fight fires. If a community has one main access road, then the vegetation on either side of the road should be cleared back some minimum distance so people can flee if they need to. The community also needs to look at vegetation and landscaping. Some plants burn much hotter and easier than others. Communities need to be laid out to prevent fires from jumping from building to building. Perhaps roads need to be wider, or easements on either side of a road need to be used that need to be kept clear of flammable vegetation.

I'm sure that there are a lot of other ideas that design professionals could come up with to minimize future fire situations.

So, my question is how many disasters do we need to witness before something is done?




posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: Wildbob77

I hope you are kidding we already have ridiculously expensive building codes and permit fee's .



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 11:22 AM
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The problem is people building and living in places prone to floods, fire and mudslides. I don’t have a lot of sympathy, sorry. a reply to: Wildbob77



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: Wildbob77

The oldest structures still standing in California are made from Adobe. Unfortunately, our current building codes dont allow them to be built.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 11:39 AM
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The cost of living in California is already out of control. Adding more regulation won't solve the issue. Moving away from the hazardous area would though.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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originally posted by: Middleoftheroad
The cost of living in California is already out of control. Adding more regulation won't solve the issue. Moving away from the hazardous area would though.


Not adding more. Completely rewriting the codes. Cast Concrete or cement siding walls. Metal or tile roofs. Steel studs. Steel window shutters. No wooden decks within 50 feet of the house. Clear space around the house with low height vegetation. No vegetation within some distance. No eucalyptus within 100 yards.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 11:47 AM
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What is the cost of replacing 6000 plus structures?

How often can we afford to do this?

I think it's foolish to do the same thing over and over while expecting a different result.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: Wildbob77

Our houses are made of wood. How do you make wood not burn?

For decades we've been made fun of that our construction sucks, that we don't use brick or stone because it's slower and more expensive. Everywhere in America, whether it's commercial or residential, is mostly wood and dry-wall.

Those two things are always going to burn, unlike rock. But our construction is cheap and it comes up very fast. You drive around town and all of a sudden there is a new bank or a restaurant up that wasn't there 2 weeks ago. You think it's gonna stand for long if it took 2 weeks to build?

Come up easy, come down easy.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: Wildbob77
I think it's foolish to do the same thing over and over while expecting a different result.

You just described the human condition.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: Wildbob77

Older structures could be grandfathered in. New codes for new construction only. Eventually the old structures would get replaced as they age out or are destroyed in disasters. Specify a 2019 code and a pre 2019 code for existing/older structures.

Eventually most of the susceptible structures would get replaced.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 12:16 PM
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a reply to: Mahogany


Everywhere in America, whether it's commercial or residential, is mostly wood and dry-wall.


Edit for clarity now that I thought about it: most commercial jobs are going to use steel studs. They can use wood as long as they are non load baring interior walls... but fire rated drywall helps negate that in some senses.

Either way, commercial building code usually makes you do something to help prevent fast moving fires, and in the long run there isn't too much dodging of spending the coin to do that.
edit on 12-11-2018 by CriticalStinker because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 12:20 PM
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We need to build with steel to prevent the kind of catastrophe



Unfortunately steel weakens during fire and collapses within a blink of an eye....




posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 12:20 PM
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From what I have seen, it looks like the Santa Rosa area is taking measures to keep people from building in certain high risk zones, and Ive seen also them declare certain areas Native American sites that was exposed by the fire where they are not letting people rebuild. . Of course people are screaming agenda 21 trying to relocate people into the cities.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 01:08 PM
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originally posted by: soundguy
The problem is people building and living in places prone to floods, fire and mudslides. I don’t have a lot of sympathy, sorry. a reply to: Wildbob77



Don’t forget earthquakes.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 01:26 PM
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Don`t forget fire degrades concrete and steel so the structure would be condemned by code officials anyway meaning a total loss and rebuilding.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: Infoshill



We need to build with steel to prevent the kind of catastrophe



Unfortunately steel weakens during fire and collapses within a blink of an eye....




Pfft that's only happened once, ok twice, o right it was three times... but all on the same day in close proximity to each other... nvm.
edit on 12-11-2018 by FocusedWolf because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: Mahogany
a reply to: Wildbob77

Our houses are made of wood. How do you make wood not burn?

For decades we've been made fun of that our construction sucks, that we don't use brick or stone because it's slower and more expensive. Everywhere in America, whether it's commercial or residential, is mostly wood and dry-wall.

Those two things are always going to burn, unlike rock. But our construction is cheap and it comes up very fast. You drive around town and all of a sudden there is a new bank or a restaurant up that wasn't there 2 weeks ago. You think it's gonna stand for long if it took 2 weeks to build?

Come up easy, come down easy.



There is Phos-check, the pink stuff the fire-fighting aircraft pour over forests.

www.dailymail.co.uk...

I wonder if there isn't some kind of foam that could be sprayed over a home to make a shell several inches thick and stop cinders floating in the air and landing on the house. Or maybe a tent made from fireproof fabric that could wrap around a home like an aircraft hangar. I'm thinking of a couple of metal arches, two side panels and one curved panel above. But in these fires, even metal will melt.



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 03:27 PM
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Duplicate post
edit on 12-11-2018 by stormcell because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 03:27 PM
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Duplicate post
edit on 12-11-2018 by stormcell because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2018 @ 03:27 PM
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Duplicate post
edit on 12-11-2018 by stormcell because: (no reason given)




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