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Data From a Dead Satellite Reveals Lost Continents Under Antarctica

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posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 01:10 PM
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The new research, published in Scientific Reports, sheds light on the murky geological history of Antarctica over the past 200 million years, and condenses it in this 24-second animation. The video reconstructs the tectonic fallout of Antarctica splitting from the bygone landmass of Gondwana, which was one subsection of the supercontinent Pangaea. Beginning around 180 million years ago, the core landmasses of Antarctica, India, and Australia broke off from Gondwana, and slowly shifted to their current locations.


Data From a Dead Satellite Reveals Lost Continents Under Antarctica





This is interesting because it sheds a little light on the hidden land mass of Antarctica. Antarctica has not always been cold and covered by ice. What will or has been found under this ice?

There are many theory's, most with no proof, of what is under that ice. Is there great danger under the ice? Viruses or technology that can wipe out mankind? Is there great hope under the ice? Undiscovered past life to make new meds? Ancient advanced technology that can benefit mankind?

Antarctica is one of the great mysteries of our time. What is under that ice ATS?




posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 01:35 PM
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The Great Old Ones sleep beneath the ice.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars




What is under that ice ATS?

Dirt.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 01:53 PM
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Let´s build an orbital laser enabled platform to find out!

Bad jokes aside, I think there will be fossils found and not because of Piri Reis´s Map. I don´t think that the entry to hollow earth is to be found there (or anywhere else on this planet).



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: notsure1
a reply to: LookingAtMars




What is under that ice ATS?

Dirt.



And bedrock also, but what else?




posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

In all likelihood? Nothing.

Even if there was, at anytime in the past when it was ice free, anything there, it's been ground into powder.

There may be some very interesting fossils, perhaps, but little else. Then, again? Who knows.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:17 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
Let´s build an orbital laser enabled platform to find out!

Bad jokes aside, I think there will be fossils found and not because of Piri Reis´s Map. I don´t think that the entry to hollow earth is to be found there (or anywhere else on this planet).


Could be frozen animal and plant life that is still intact also.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars


The new research, published in Scientific Reports, sheds light on the murky geological history of Antarctica over the past 200 million years, and condenses it in this 24-second animation. The video reconstructs the tectonic fallout of Antarctica splitting from the bygone landmass of Gondwana, which was one subsection of the supercontinent Pangaea. Beginning around 180 million years ago, the core landmasses of Antarctica, India, and Australia broke off from Gondwana, and slowly shifted to their current locations.


Data From a Dead Satellite Reveals Lost Continents Under Antarctica





This is interesting because it sheds a little light on the hidden land mass of Antarctica. Antarctica has not always been cold and covered by ice. What will or has been found under this ice?

There are many theory's, most with no proof, of what is under that ice. Is there great danger under the ice? Viruses or technology that can wipe out mankind? Is there great hope under the ice? Undiscovered past life to make new meds? Ancient advanced technology that can benefit mankind?

Antarctica is one of the great mysteries of our time. What is under that ice ATS?





Atlantis...

So cool to see this. The earth has gone through so many changes. I would love to know what we find under all the ice, but I doubt I will be alive when it is finally revealed.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: LookingAtMars

In all likelihood? Nothing.

Even if there was, at anytime in the past when it was ice free, anything there, it's been ground into powder.

There may be some very interesting fossils, perhaps, but little else. Then, again? Who knows.


What do your think ground it to powder? The weight of the ice? Glaciers?



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:20 PM
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cool theory, but personally I doubt that there was intelligent life form back then.

and I would like to say that looking at the short clip, I noticed that earth stayed the same size when the tectonics were moving chunks of land mass away from each other, this doesn't make sense to me because I believe that this motion should have made earth expand in size, therefore earth should have grown bigger in the process, just a thought.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Ice flows kinda like water. Glaciers being a great example, but you'll get a similar effect wherever there's changes in elevation and tonnes of ice above.

We'd probably find stuff in more unique locations though, most of the ancient fossils we find these days are mere bone fragments, we do find near complete skeletons in the right places. Antarctica is huge after all.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars
It would depend of course.

If the animals went through several cycles and refrosted over and over again, most of the cell-water would have destroyed both the animals and plant´s cells by bursting most of them.

You basically get a slurry or mudy substance as the cells break up and the liquid disperses. I would not talk about life anymore, at that point.

If the freezing happened relative fast and there was no thawing, sure!


edit on 9-11-2018 by verschickter because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:39 PM
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Pretty sure that’s where Hoffa is.

On point though, fascinating stuff. I’m curious to dig deeper!



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: Dr UAE

It happens over huge lengths of time, in laymen's terms basically what happens when two plates collide is one will be pushed under the other. The plate pushed under the other is "recycled" and generally pushes up the plate it's colliding with, usually some distance from the collision zone. The Andes mountain range is a great example.
To add: we can't discount volcanoes either, if subduction occurs it'll alter the pressure under the crust. Subduction zones tend to have volcanoes, the ring of fire comes to mind.

It's a bit more complicated than that though, there's a lot more too it. Like for instance continental crust is 5-10x thicker than oceanic crust but oceanic crust is a lot more dense. Worth looking up if you have the time, there's plenty of science to back up the theory.
edit on 9-11-2018 by RAY1990 because: More to add

edit on 9-11-2018 by RAY1990 because: Spelling



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:53 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: LookingAtMars
It would depend of course.

If the animals went through several cycles and refrosted over and over again, most of the cell-water would have destroyed both the animals and plant´s cells by bursting most of them.

You basically get a slurry or mudy substance as the cells break up and the liquid disperses. I would not talk about life anymore, at that point.

If the freezing happened relative fast and there was no thawing, sure!



We know for sure there is life under the ice in special places.

Cold, Dark and Alive! Life Discovered in Buried Antarctic Lake


Antarctica has nearly 400 lakes trapped under its ice sheet. Some of them — like Lake Whillans — are connected by rivers and streams. Others are deep, isolated basins like Lake Vostok, where drillers have yet to successfully recover uncontaminated water samples. The new Lake Whillans discovery raises scientists' hopes that these other hidden waterways also carry life.



Drillers broke through to Lake Whillans in January 2013, after years of planning and more than $10 million spent by the National Science Foundation. The team, called WISSARD, used a custom hot-water drill with its own decontamination system. Within a day of pulling out the tea-colored water, tests done in a temporary lab confirmed the lake sparked with life. Researchers returned to the United States with 8 gallons (30 liters) of lake water and eight sediment cores from the lake bottom. Scientists at Montana State University, the University of Tennessee and other institutions parsed out the precious samples, growing cultures of different cell types and sequencing the DNA. The results show evidence for 3,931 species of single-celled life in Lake Whillans. [Video: Life Discovered in Subglacial Lake Whillans] "We were surprised about the number of organisms," Christner said. "It's really not that different than the number of organisms in a lake on the surface."



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Great find. I've always been intrigued by what lies beneath Antarctica's ice. Massive pine forests, animals that we've never seen before, frozen in time, and perhaps even the species of men that were here before Neanderthals.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars
You wrote about animals and plants and I replied on that base.

If we now talk about any kind of organism, I agree.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: verschickter

I knew that you were replying in that context and should of pointed that out.

If there are hydro thermal vents or certain mineral deposits in these under ice lakes and rivers. Could there not be plant or animal life as well?



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 03:07 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

The reminds of a advance civilization perhaps, perhaps we are not the first round of humans to go around.



posted on Nov, 9 2018 @ 03:11 PM
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originally posted by: LSU2018
a reply to: LookingAtMars

Great find. I've always been intrigued by what lies beneath Antarctica's ice. Massive pine forests, animals that we've never seen before, frozen in time, and perhaps even the species of men that were here before Neanderthals.


I am all for exploring other planets, but we really should put more resources toward exploring this planet. Under the ice, under the ground and under the sea.



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