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Interesting picture of Ceres

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posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 04:55 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: Urantia1111

Trick question:

What happens if you wrap a flat sheet of paper around any non-flat surface?
It wrinkles.

Now use that new knowledge and transfer it to 2D (=flat) photographs overlayed on rough terrain.


Trick Question:

WTF are you even talking about?

Theres a rectangular something depicted in the photo with perimeter lights.

Put down your joke book, put on your glasses and look again.




posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 05:21 PM
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originally posted by: Urantia1111

originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: Urantia1111

Trick question:

What happens if you wrap a flat sheet of paper around any non-flat surface?
It wrinkles.

Now use that new knowledge and transfer it to 2D (=flat) photographs overlayed on rough terrain.


Trick Question:

WTF are you even talking about?

Theres a rectangular something depicted in the photo with perimeter lights.

Put down your joke book, put on your glasses and look again.


It's a fairly simple analogy for what you're seeing.

There is no rectangular object, or perimeter lights, the feature you are seeing is caused by the join in 2D images overlain on a 3D DTM.

Put on your glasses and look again.



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: Urantia1111

Did you look at the original mosaic? I posted a link to it, but apparently nobody saw it.



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 06:31 PM
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I use photogrammetry daily. It’s my job. So I know a thing or two about it.
At times when there is low image overlap on the edges of an orthomosaic there will be deformation, exaggeration of lines...artifacts to say the least.
Not saying I’m 100% right, cause closed.
I’m just giving my experience from something that I’ve done for a living for the past 10 years.



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 08:53 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

You may be right the original combines two pictures it just doesnt tell you what. If one was radar imaging then your right.

Here is more pics

dawn.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 08:55 PM
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originally posted by: verschickter
a reply to: M4ngo

Because NASA could care less if someone on the internet thinks these are alien bases. Why would they waste energy on that?

I mean, do they need to point out every artifact now so conspiracy theorists can sleep better? You would not believe them so the point is moot.



Nasa doesn't care about anything at all.

Most disappointing sellout organization of our lifetimes.



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 09:21 PM
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Interesting. I don't buy image stiching areas. The use of software to render images been around for a while now to eliminate these kind of image stiching errors.
They do see to suggest and artificial arrangement of something on Ceres.



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 10:41 PM
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originally posted by: AthlonSavage
Interesting. I don't buy image stiching areas. The use of software to render images been around for a while now to eliminate these kind of image stiching errors.
They do see to suggest and artificial arrangement of something on Ceres.

So how comes we don't see these bright dots in other images of that area?



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Because Nasa photoshopped them out. Everyone knows they do that Sheesh.



posted on Nov, 4 2018 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: AthlonSavage

And then put them back in.

That makes perfect sense.



posted on Nov, 5 2018 @ 01:44 AM
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originally posted by: AthlonSavage
Interesting. I don't buy image stiching areas.


And that somehow means they aren't?


The use of software to render images been around for a while now to eliminate these kind of image stiching errors.


Used many of them have you? I've done plenty of image stitching and 3D terrain modelling with photographs and DTMs and you get all kinds of glitches thrown up.



They do see to suggest and artificial arrangement of something on Ceres.


Ceres is interesting enough - it doesn't need imaginary features on it.



posted on Nov, 5 2018 @ 07:19 AM
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a reply to: Urantia1111

I did, still my opinion is it´s artifact. I see you are unable to visualize this process in your head. Very sad!



posted on Nov, 5 2018 @ 03:32 PM
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originally posted by: AthlonSavage
Interesting. I don't buy image stiching areas.

I don't think it's a stitching problem but a mapping problem, when they "wrapped" the image below onto the 3D surface.

For those that have problems reading older posts, here's the image again.
(click the image for the full size version)



The use of software to render images been around for a while now to eliminate these kind of image stiching errors.

It's not a stitching error, is a mapping error, and those are more a result of the method and program used than anything else. The fact that software to do that has been in use for a long time means nothing, as NASA probably uses software made specifically for that, maybe even part of the ISIS suite.


They do see to suggest and artificial arrangement of something on Ceres.

They only appear on the 3D image, and that to me suggests that it's an artefact of the mapping of the image onto the 3D model. And it looks like a mapping artefact.



posted on Nov, 5 2018 @ 10:24 PM
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Actually, I think it looks like antialiasing problem. Just a problem of fitting a smooth 3D image into computer's pixels.
edit on 5-11-2018 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2018 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

Is the DTM available? Be interesting to see if the problem can be replicated.



posted on Nov, 6 2018 @ 01:52 PM
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To me, the fact that the 'glitches' follow the terrain is a good pointer to image mapping error...but...if this is such a common problem, I would expect there to be more glitches in the image. The rest of the image looks excellent and glitch-free. Is the occurrence of these artefacts totally random or usually uniform across an image? The nature of the human brain to find geometry in a random set of patterns is a well documented phenomenon.



posted on Nov, 6 2018 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

Maybe this?

sbn.psi.edu...



posted on Nov, 6 2018 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: fromtheskydown

From what I have seen, it appears in areas with bigger differences in altitude, where the image is more "stretched".



posted on Nov, 6 2018 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

A quick browse of the files suggests that's the entire surface, rather than just that small area.

If I can find where that image you posted sits on that surface I'll give it a go

edit on 6/11/2018 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2018 @ 03:24 PM
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There's a very good wiki page on the faculae,

en.wikipedia.org...

complete with this awesome 3D view:

upload.wikimedia.org...

No landing sights or bases.



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