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NTS You were washed (in the name of Christ)

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posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:06 PM
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“Such were some of you, but you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified, in the name of the Lord Jesus and in the Spirit of our God” – 1 Corinthians ch6 v11

The message of the New Testament centres upon what God achieved in Christ, through his death on the Cross and his Resurrection..
All this was happening “on account of our sins”, for the sake of doing something about them.
And the promised result is the forgiveness of sin.

We are told that we have been “washed”.
Washing, in the Old Testament, was a physical act which became a metaphor.
The ritual laws demand that a man should wash himself, or part of himself, and perhaps also his clothing, on certain specified occasions.
Sometimes it is not physical pollution that is being washed away, but spiritual pollution.
So a person protesting his innocence of murder could act out his claim, by washing his hands to show there was “no blood on them”.
Of course this is exactly what Pilate was doing in front of the Jerusalem crowd.

Following on from this physical washing, acting out a metaphor , the washing itself can become just a verbal expression;
“I kept my heart clean and washed my hands in innocence”. (Psalm 73 v13)
Therefore the prophets and the psalms speak of the need for the people to “wash themselves” from their sins.

Isaiah urges the people of Jerusalem to “Wash yourselves, make yourselves clean”, because their hands are “full of blood”.
This “washing” is then explained as “cease to do evil, learn to do good, seek justice, correct oppression; defend the fatherless, plead for the widow”. (ch1 vv15-17)
And the prophet looks forward to a time when
“The Lord shall have washed away the filth of the daughters of Zion, and cleansed the bloodstains of Jerusalem” (ch4 v4)
Jeremiah makes a similar demand;
“O Jerusalem, wash your heart from wickedness, that you may be saved.
How long shall your evil thoughts lodge within you?” (ch4 v14).

The same language applies to the sins of the individual.
In Psalm 51 we find the plea;
“Wash me thoroughly from my iniquity,
And cleanse me from my sin…
Purge me with hyssop and I will be clean;
Wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow” (v2, v7)
And this is another way of saying
“Create in me a clean heart, O God, and put a new and right spirit within me” (v10).

Of course the washing could not literally cleanse away the pollutions of sin and guilt.
The act is a dramatized metaphor, offering the image of guilt as a removable blot, something which cannot be allowed to remain untreated.

The New Testament also picks up this metaphor.
God saved us “in virtue of his own mercy, by the washing of regeneration and renewal in the Holy Spirit which he poured out upon us richly” (Titus ch3 vv5-6).
Paul reminds the Corinthians that some of them used to be evildoers, guilty of theft and adultery and similar offences.
Then he adds, in the words quoted at the top of the page, “But you were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified…”.
This offers “washing” as the first stage of the process of entering a right relationship with God.

These references to washing may have been suggested, at least, by the ritual of baptism.
At a deeper level, though, the real cleansing agent in these events is the Holy Spirit.
Baptism is associated with the forgiveness of sin because it is associated with the Holy Spirit.
Thus Peter advises the crowd in Jerusalem to “repent and be baptised…in the name of Jesus Christ for the forgiveness of your sins; and you shall receive the gift of the Holy Spirit” (Acts ch2 v38).
The version in 1 Peter is that baptism saves “not as a removal of dirt from the body, but as an appeal to God for a clear conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (1 Peter ch3 v21).
In the story of Cornelius, baptism is the logical consequence of a previous reception of the Holy Spirit;
“Can anyone forbid water for baptising these people, who have received the Holy Spirit just as we have?” (Acts ch10 v47).
Baptism is not the cleansing act itself, but a symbol of the cleansing, what the Anglican catechism calls “the outward and visible sign of an inward and spiritual grace”.

On the other hand, “they have washed their robes and made them white in the blood of the Lamb” (Revelation ch7 v14) is an image clearly based on the Old Testament rituals.
To be exact, it goes back to Zechariah’s vision of the high priest Joshua, standing before God clothed in the “filthy garments” of his guilt.
The angel of the Lord declared “I have taken your iniquity away from you”.
And as a token of that, they took away his filthy garments and gave him clean ones (Zechariah ch3 vv1-5).
An earlier chapter in Revelation declares that God’s people have been made “a kingdom and priests”, which puts them on the same level as Joshua, having the same need for holiness.
Then the statement that their robes have been washed amounts to a similar declaration that their iniquity has been taken away.
References in the New Testament to “the blood of the Lamb” or “the blood of Christ” are shorthand for “the fact that Jesus died”.
So that startling and self-contradictory image of “washed white in the blood of the Lamb” carries the meaning that their guilt has been removed in consequence of the death of Jesus on the cross.

If sin is not a literal blot, then the “washing” imagery of the New Testament remains a metaphor.
But there is (in Christian teaching) a vital difference between the two cases.
The washing ritual in the Old Testament was a way of describing what needed to be done.
The picture of being “washed” by means of the death of Christ is a way of describing what has been accomplished.
It means that the problem of sin has been dealt with, to the same effect as if it had been physically removed.

When Paul combines together those three claims, namely “washed”, “justified”, and “sanctified”, that indicates at the very least that they were all made complete at the same time.
But it also implies that these are three different ways of saying the same thing.
Namely that, in the eyes of God, our state of sin is no longer held against us.

In the absence of the old barrier of sin, we have entered into a new relationship with God.




posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:07 PM
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The “washing” metaphor and the doctrine of Purgatory

The doctrine of Purgatory, as it developed in the Middle Ages, should be seen as a by-product of the “stain” metaphor of sin.
In many early speculations about Purgatory, there was the image of a “cleansing fire”, based on 1 Corinthians ch3 vv10-15.
But even Catholic commentators are beginning to recognise that this passage is about testing the effectiveness of Christian leaders and teachers in their work of building the church.
The Roman Catholic catechism describes Purgatory as a purification after death, “so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven”.
The official modern explanation is that sin “entails an unhealthy attachment to creatures”, but this looks like a way of rationalising the original “stain” metaphor.
In my own definition, sin is the misalignment of the human will away from the will of God, which breaks the relationship between man and God; from which it follows that the spoiled relationship with God IS the great impurity which needs to be “washed “ or purged away by the re-alignment work of Christ.
Believers in Purgatory are assuming that sin leaves a persistent additional stain which needs a separate cure.
They are neglecting, in my view, the full significance of the statement quoted at the top of the opening post;
“You were washed, you were sanctified, you were justified, in the name of the Lord Jesus and in the Spirit of our God.”
In other words, the people he is addressing are already purified and have already achieved the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:08 PM
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N.T.S. stands for New Testament Salvation.
This thread is one of a series, and I wanted to mark the fact without making the title too cumbersome.
The series is a sequel to, and the consummation of, the older series on Old Testament remedies for sin.
In that series, sin is defined as a relationship problem; the human will is out of alignment with the will of God.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:24 PM
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I could never figure out how a god powerful enough to create earth....and then fill it with peeps in his image, needed to send a human form of himself down here to be a martyr. I mean its like naughty kids. Wouldnt you just gather them up and smack them around? Its like Bill Cosby.....i brought you into thiz world.....and i can take you out.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: lakenheath24
Since we don't have more experience than him in the world-creating business, we're not in any position to argue that our way of doing things would have been better. What do we know?
Your suggestion of just getting rid of them; the Biblical God keeps threatening that (e.g. The Flood), but doesn't want to go through with it. He seems to think that trying to win them back is a better idea.

The opening chapters of the epistle to the Hebrews do offer some explanation of the necessity of taking human form. You could read those again and think through the question.
The threads in this series are building the structure of something similar (same explanation, essentially, different wording).



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

What kind of horrible things do you do that you need to constantly ask for forgiveness?



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:52 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: lakenheath24
Since we don't have more experience than him in the world-creating business, we're not in any position to argue that our way of doing things would have been better. What do we know?
Your suggestion of just getting rid of them; the Biblical God keeps threatening that (e.g. The Flood), but doesn't want to go through with it. He seems to think that trying to win them back is a better idea.

The opening chapters of the epistle to the Hebrews do offer some explanation of the necessity of taking human form. You could read those again and think through the question.
The threads in this series are building the structure of something similar (same explanation, essentially, different wording).

I can name a bunch of things that i could have done better if i had the powers that you say god had



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:53 PM
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a reply to: Woodcarver
The message of this thread is that forgiveness of sin comes from a single event. I don't regard that as "constantly asking".

The premise of the series is that sin is defined as "the misalignment of human will away from the will of God". As such, it needs to be dealt with even when it is not producing "horrible things".



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:53 PM
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originally posted by: Woodcarver
a reply to: DISRAELI

What kind of horrible things do you do that you need to constantly ask for forgiveness?


To be fair, from what i can tell about biblical rules, the question should be what part of being alive don't you have to walk around constantly asking for forgiveness for?



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 06:54 PM
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originally posted by: Woodcarver
I can name a bunch of things that i could have done better if i had the powers that you say god had

You really think too highly of yourself. You couldn't.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:08 PM
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Nobody have a right to say perpetrators debt (karma) is gone without the perpetrator making 1:1 restoration.

Any being calling itself god is a unrighteous being if it stands in the way of 1:1 restoration. Not settling the debt and trying to get a free ride from responsibility is the character of hypocrites. Being a hypocrites is not a character trait of an Anointed ONE.

Yeshua preached sheeps and goats. You get what you deserve. Not hypocrisy.

The teaching of Paul is a manipulation to not take responsibility for behavior. Selling hypocrisy to the masses.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:21 PM
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a reply to: Woodcarver



I can name a bunch of things that i could have done better if i had the powers that you say god had


Many souls have a better moral compass than the example Abrahamic duallistic religions give.

But I think I would have done the same separation of realms:

The Divine Realms for the uncorrupted.
The In between for the souls that are in between.
And the corrupted Ones in the lower levels.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:21 PM
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a reply to: LittleByLittle
Karma isn't part of Biblical teaching, so it can't be used as a criterion for judging Biblical theology.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: lakenheath24
I could never figure out how a god powerful enough to create earth....and then fill it with peeps in his image, needed to send a human form of himself down here to be a martyr. I mean its like naughty kids. Wouldnt you just gather them up and smack them around? Its like Bill Cosby.....i brought you into thiz world.....and i can take you out.


It's complicated, and I doubt this summary will satisfy you, but He had to become human so that the power of death over humanity would be broken. Not physical death, but spiritual death.

When Adam and Eve disobeyed God in the Garden of Eden, they became beholden to Satan. When they die, they go to him. Sin=death. So when Jesus was crucified, buried, and then rose again, he broke the power of death that Satan has over humans. Since Christ was sinless, Satan had no claim on him, and He became alive again. So, all who believe in Jesus will also have life after their physical death, because Jesus will claim them.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI

originally posted by: Woodcarver
I can name a bunch of things that i could have done better if i had the powers that you say god had

You really think too highly of yourself. You couldn't.
I would have said that people should never be able to own humans. That would make me far more compassionate than jesus himself, who never said anything of the sort.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

I have a few questions.

Do you think jesus is god?

The same god from the Old testament?

Do you think the laws from the old testament are still valid?

Do you think the 10 commandments are still applicable?



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

So sheeps and goats are not in the bible?
Eye for an Eye?

You attempt is a misdirection since you cannot handle the contradiction between free ride hypocrisy and doing the right thing and restoring the balance.

Even the Abrahamic religions start out with 1:1 karma and then deviate into free ride hypocrisy to sell the religion to the followers.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:37 PM
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a reply to: Woodcarver
Your questions are off-topic for this thread, but i will give you links to other threads where I have already discussed them in detail;

Is Jesus God?
The Word became flesh
Jesus is a man
My preferred phrasing is the orthodox formula that Christ is BOTH God and man.

The God of Jesus, the God of the Old Testament
The first of several threads, saying the same thing about the God of Peter, of Paul, of John, and of Hebrews.

As for the laws of the Old Testament, I've done a whole series on that issue. Here is the Index Thread;
God's law; Your patient teacher


edit on 2-11-2018 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: LittleByLittle
a reply to: Woodcarver



I can name a bunch of things that i could have done better if i had the powers that you say god had


Many souls have a better moral compass than the example Abrahamic duallistic religions give.

But I think I would have done the same separation of realms:

The Divine Realms for the uncorrupted.
The In between for the souls that are in between.
And the corrupted Ones in the lower levels.

WHy wouldn’t you just make everyone a good person. Then you wouldn’t need to play the good, bad, and inbetween game. You also wouldn’t need to punish the majority of all humans who ever existed.

I mean, if you have the powers of a god and all.



posted on Nov, 2 2018 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: Woodcarver
Your questions are off-topic for this thread, but i will give you links to other threads where I have already discussed them in detail;
(Bear with me. I need to track them down one by one)

Nobody reads your threads anyways, so you might as well settle for answering my questions.







 
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