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How many here homeschool your children or know others that do?

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posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 02:37 PM
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I'm trying to figure out how these numbers that are reported by the government are distributed. It looks like there are about 1.8 million (some say 2.3) currenly homeschooled children. I am wondering if a large number of these are kids in grades 1-6 or if it is just as prevelant for those in middle and high school as well.

I'm also curious what you think of the materials available (books, etc) for homeschooling and what you would like to see imporved in this area.

Also, if there were improvements in the "quality" of materials and support for homeschoolers, do you think there would be an increase in the number of people who choose to home school their children?

If you do home school, do you do this with a group of other kids, where they get together for certain projects, trips, etc, like a small class for homeschooled children? Do you get to use the public school's facilities (or equipment) at all for any of this? If you don't have groups, do you think there would be a benefit to having this if the other kids and parents were of like minds (everyone works well together).

Do you feel that the quality of education is overall better than what they could recieve in a public/private school?



Finally, did you choose home schooling because your child had special needs or difficulties (autism, physical disability, medial condition, extreme OCD, etc) and did the local districk offer support for you to help with this /these issues?




posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 02:44 PM
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I've known some ppl who were home schooled. The only issue I have with it is that kids don't get the socialization that they do in public school. They aren't used to peer pressure and when they hit public school, they go kinda wild. Several of them got pregnant at an early age. I'm not trying to paint all home schooled ppl like this, just the ones I've met.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 03:03 PM
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We've discussed it.

We're not totally thrilled with the public school in terms of its academic rigor. Our son falls in that gray area between being gifted and being average. As his teacher puts it, he's either way above average or slightly above average in the things he does. He also has dysgraphia.

He needs both intensive support for writing tasks, and accommodation in other areas to allow him to show what he knows without his difficulty with writing to get in the way.

He also reads well above grade level. The rest of the class is working through Mo Willems and he's reading us abridged versions of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea and The Three Musketeers.

We're very close to being able to make it on husband's income alone, but if the state legislature would pass a voucher bill even just for families with children with learning disabilities, there is either a very fine private school near us or I could look at homeschooling him for a few years and try to get him some intensive remediation for his handwriting and spelling troubles.

As for the other concerns, legally homeschool children can gain access to programs in public schools like sports activities and clubs, and there are active co-op groups where parents take it in turns to teach small groups of homeschool children. And the sources of curricula and online programs for homeschooling have improved a lot. It's not just for religious parents, too. There are an increasing number of progressive homeschooling parents and POC who are homeschooling these days.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

I've known lots of people that have homeschool. Some have done it better than the public school system and some have failed miserably and screwed their kids in the process.

I think if you choose to do you really have to be committed to it. I think what Autorico said about socialization is important too. I know a lot of homeschoolers are church related and have friends in that regard. That is fine, but I think it would be valuable to expose your kids to regular folks too. I know a family that were never outside of the church. When their son went to regular high school he it was basically like putting a kid from the 1930s in today's school system. Let's just say it wasn't pretty. Unless you live in a cult or something, your kids will have to deal with regular everyday weird people!

PS. I think it is fine if people to choose to homeschool or choose not to homeschool, but please don't post on Facebook everyday why homeschools is sooo much better, that is really annoying!



edit on 1-11-2018 by JAGStorm because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

My mum had a total melt down about 8 years back, got way to caught up in the cult of Christianity and moved to the bush, then pulled my step brother & sister out of the local school to home school them, cause my little bro was getting bullied.

Honestly, I think home schooling is a form of narcissistic child abuse!

Yeah, society isn't perfect and can be cold and incredibly shallow... But its important for kids to be apart of it, so that they can learn to thrive in it and have a fighting chance to be a stable & contributing member of it.

wrapping your kids in bubble wrap and hiding them away from society, in an attempt to protect them of the brutal reality of society, is the cruellest thing any parent can do, imo... Cause one day they'll be adults and have no social skills or experience of what to expect from life, except the little narcissistic bubble you've kept them captive in for their entire childhood.
edit on 1-11-2018 by Subaeruginosa because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Homeschool our youngest.

He's socialized just fine.

We use Time4learning and supplemental texts.

He also is taking college classes in January.

he's 15.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

I live in West Texas and was surprised to learn last year that a very large number of people out here have begun homeschooling. It has been made possible because of the proliferation of online course materials approved by the State for use in homeschooling.

Everyone I've talked to that's doing the homeschooling cites bullying and the deteriorating quality of the public schools systems as the two primary reasons to homeschool. In our district of about 400 students, 1st ~12th, it appears about 6 to 8 students are pulled from the schools for homeschooling. Last year 6 kids were pulled from a 5th grade class because of bullying; the parents told me that basically the inmates run the asylum and the teachers/administration refuse to address the issues of bullying.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

It also depends on the kid. My daughter did awesome and graduated 1 1/2 yrs early. But my sons were put back into public school because they punished me everyday to try and make them study.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Homeschool our youngest.

He's socialized just fine.

We use Time4learning and supplemental texts.

He also is taking college classes in January.

he's 15.



I don't think there is a lot of socialization in public schools even though they are around kids all the time. At lunch kids sit in little groups, at recess they play in little groups, between classes they walk in little groups. Sure they are around other kids more (meaning larger masses), but I think the best socialization comes from things like large group activities like community sports, boy/girl scouts, 4H, church groups and other things like that. I think that is where the BEST kinds of socialization happens, the rest is often just dealing with people in passing, where there is little to no interaction. They might learn how to deal with bullies better in public schools, but that can also happen in sports teams as well as just around the neighborhood.


For those who think that home schooling has failed some of the kids taking part in it, is it because the parents were not involved or incapable of teaching their kids or is it that the curriculum's aren't "up to snuff" and with there being so many options from which to choose, picking the wrong one or style could be very detrimental to the child.

Are there some standard cirriculums that home schooler's use or is it largely a mix and match that is chosen by the parent who thinks the ones they choose are best for their kids, though they may be sub par, possibly "easy to pass", but not stimulating for the child nor allowing them to make the needed connections/associations between topics and subjects.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 04:01 PM
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My Native American neighbors down the road homeschooled their 3 kids in a cult Christian tradition.

Those kids are dead. Alcohol and drugs...none reached 30yrs of age.
edit on 1-11-2018 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 04:13 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof




I don't think there is a lot of socialization in public schools even though they are around kids all the time


Socialization is so much more than just kids interacting with kids, it's the bus driver, the teachers, the administrators, the field trips you go on, the people that visit your school, the other schools you visit.

It is very sad, i've know homeschooled kids that were practically prisoners in their own homes. One family just wanted to homeschool their girls and then get them all married. That plan didn't work because it is impossible to meet a boyfriend if you don't ever go out. They are all freaking out now as they are turning into old maids...(in their minds) The girls had such poor socialization skills that when they turned into adults, had a very difficult time even in the most basic kind of jobs. Still no weddings either, and these girls are literally waiting for "prince charming" to come sweep them off their feet.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 04:16 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

But in how many of those public school settings is that socialization bad?

If you're talking about a public school where discipline is not maintained and learning time is frequently disrupted, then is that really a good thing that your child is "socialized"?



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

Even "bad" socialization can be good. It teaches kids how to deal with real world situation. When they go to college or work, they can't choose only "good" socialization people. Now, I'm not talking about teachers, or clergy or whatever that molest or do that kind of stuff (yes that's bad bad). I'm talking about dealing with people with attitudes, opinions different than theirs, maybe friends that do drugs, maybe friends that swear.

I have relatives that homeschooled. When they came to visit, their kids all wanted to go to school with my kids. It was like they really really wanted to go to public school but did not want to disappoint their parents. I have a feeling that a lot older homeschooled kids long for things like Prom, and a normal graduation and stuff like that.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 04:38 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Our son is involved with Civil Air Patrol, music, Driver's Ed at the high school, piano lessons/recitals, and works a job on the weekends. He's busy with friends and even a young lady friend he goes out with on "dates" on Fridays (monitored by both sets of parents)

His curriculum is based on standardized tests we have him take, recommended placements and required courses for high school.

Sciences, History, Civics, English, math.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 04:39 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: JAGStorm

But in how many of those public school settings is that socialization bad?

If you're talking about a public school where discipline is not maintained and learning time is frequently disrupted, then is that really a good thing that your child is "socialized"?


That's the problem being reported about the PS system where I live. The classrooms have come to reflect a culture similar to "Lord of the Flys". The biggest, meanest kids rule and the teachers just show up and take it while the bad kids act out. Apparently there isn't anything the administration is willing to do to regain control. And every year, they have to replace half or more of the teachers because they quit after one year of abuse.

It takes a village to raise a drug addled middle school bully.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: DigginFoTroof
He's busy with friends and even a young lady friend he goes out with on "dates" on Fridays (monitored by both sets of parents)


Sounds good... I'm sure sure you won't screw up that relationship he has with that "young lady", by being way to invasive and over protective.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

I taught some tough classrooms, and saw what happens when you can't properly discipline the kids. When the most disruptive can't be suspended and come back day after day, refuse to respond to anything you do and calling parents produces no results, you can't produce a learning environment for the rest of the kids very well.

They all suffer.

That's not good socialization.

When there is a fight a day in the halls, that's not good at all.

Maybe you want your kid to learn those lessons, but I'd rather mine not. It's one thing to deal with difficult situations and another thing to deal with a bunch of gang members trying to beat the crap out of him.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: DigginFoTroof

Home schooled my daughter. She went through one of the charter schools. Best thing we ever did. She was being bullied by the administration of the public school she went to. All her classes were on line. She had deadlines for assignments and had to "attend" virtual lectures. It worked out quite well for her. She is a self thinking adult now and has a good head on her shoulders. She chose to get a job at a dairy at 14 and now has a very good work ethic.

As far as the numbers of homeschooled kids, when my daughter graduated the ceremony was at the basket ball court for THEE Ohio State University. The largest graduating class of the year. Something like 3500 kids. AAALLLL day long we were there.

Home schooling is not for all however. My daughter did not need someone looking over her shoulder all the time making sure she did what she needed to do. She was able to do t on her own. My granddaughter however had to go back to public school becuase she just was not self motivated.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko




Maybe you want your kid to learn those lessons, but I'd rather mine not. It's one thing to deal with difficult situations and another thing to deal with a bunch of gang members trying to beat the crap out of him.


You mean teach my kids survival? Yes absolutely, now as adults they are all very well rounded.
What do you think happens to all those people after school, they don't disappear. You might just be delaying the inevitable.

Also, not sure what school your kids go to, but the ones mine went to were pretty good, and not gangland. I'm sure if we lived in the inner city or something like that I would either move or homeschool.



posted on Nov, 1 2018 @ 05:34 PM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

I'm not talking about the one my kid is in now, but one I taught at for a few years.

Some of those parents were pretty locked in with no recourse to up and move.

My point is that in some cases, the social situation of a school is not going to be the kind of place that will provide a healthy environment for your child. Not all socialization is good socialization.

It should be up to the parents to decide what solutions work best.



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